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Journal article

The Americans with Disabilities Act: a decision tree for social services administrators

Authors:
O'BRIEN Gerald V., ELLEGOOD Christina
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 50(3), July 2005, pp.271-279.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act has had a profound influence on social workers and social services administrators in virtually all work settings. This article provides a "decision tree" for administrators to assist with the evaluation of claims. This decision tree allows people who are considering the validity of an ADA claim to break the decision-making process into discrete steps that can be considered separately and sequentially. These steps include employee and disability status, employer knowledge of the disability, employee qualification for the job, the provision of accommodations, the adverse actions that may be included in a claim, valid employer rationales for adverse action, and the procedural elements required for a successful ADA claim. Issues that are important in each step are discussed.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The ask force

Author:
MILLER Alison
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 6.2.03, 2003, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on Ask Us! an initiative run by the Children's Society which aimed to give disabled children and young people a chance to tell planners and decision-makers what they want. The most powerful messages have been included on a CD-ROM 'Ask Us'.

Journal article

Out of sight out of mind

Author:
LONSDALE Susan
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.5.91, 1991, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Women with disabilities need user-led provision from social services if they are to lead assertive and independent lives.

Journal article

Service integration and co-ordination: a framework of approaches for the delivery of co-ordinated care to children with disabilities and their families

Authors:
KING G., MEYER K.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(4), July 2006, pp.477-492.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article clarifies the nature of 'service integration' and 'service co-ordination' and discusses how these aspects relate to the fundamental goal of providing co-ordinated care for children with disabilities and their families. Based on a review of the service delivery literatures in the fields of health, social services and rehabilitation, a framework is presented that outlines the scope of the co-ordination-related functions and activities encompassed in three common types of approaches to the delivery of co-ordinated care. These are a system/sector-based service integration approach, an agency-based service integration approach and a client/family-based service co-ordination approach. The functions outlined in the framework include aggregate-level planning of services (designed to map out the scope and plan for service provision in a community or geographical area), administrative functions (designed to ensure wise and equitable access to resources) and client-specific service delivery functions (designed to link clients/families to needed services). The framework is a tool that can be used to support policy making and decision making with respect to the design of efforts to provide co-ordinated care. It provides information about commonly used approaches and the essential elements of these approaches, which can be used in making choices about the scope and nature of an approach towards service integration/co-ordination.

Journal article

A model of self-determination

Authors:
GILSON Stephen French, DePOY Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 3(4), 2004, pp.3-17.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Social work literature and practice are replete with reference to the concepts of self-determination, choice, empowerment, and self-advocacy. These concepts take on particular importance when considered in relation to individuals with disabilities and to the work of social work professionals with disabled individuals. However, despite a common perception that general understanding and agreement on the meaning and actualization of these concepts exists, there is significant variation among individuals and groups in how the concepts are defined and used. In this discussion the authors clarify the terms and place them in a contextual model comprised of three axes: foundation, thinking, and action. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Journal article

Defining and organizing self-advocate centered groups: implications of survey research on self-advocacy groups in Japan

Authors:
TSUDA Riji, SMITH John G.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(6), October 2004, pp.627-646.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Ideally group members who have intellectual disabilities should have power in their self-advocacy groups, leading to groups that can be considered 'self-advocate centered.' Currently, not all self-advocacy groups can be considered self-advocate centered because group advisors have an overwhelming influence on group decisions. This article assumes that establishing self-advocacy groups in which members truly control the agenda and make key decisions is one of the most effective methods to empower people with intellectual disabilities. This study identifies factors useful in identifying 'self-advocate centered' groups, and especially focuses on the relationship between self-advocates and advisors. It is based on a quantitative research project conducted in Japan. According to the results of the research, though relational transformation between self-advocates and advisors was commonly seen in many self-advocacy groups, conflicts between them were scarcely observed. The meaning of relational transformation without conflicts is considered, along with the concepts of independence and interdependence.

Book

Starting with choice: inclusive strategies for consulting young children

Authors:
DICKINS Mary, EMERSON Sue, GORDON-SMITH Pat
Publisher:
Save the Children
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
45p.
Place of publication:
London

When children are encouraged to choose, they develop confidence and the ability to make decisions for themselves. It is good for them, and for the places they learn and play. Young children with disabilities have a right to make choices too. Involving all children in decision-making can be challenging but, if the right questions are asked in the right ways, young disabled children can and will express their views. The book provides practical guidance on consulting young children, and a range of techniques that help young children to express their views and make choices. It also looks at when consultation can be effective, at how it fits in to the foundation stage guidance, and at how to train and support early years workers to gain the skills they need.

Book Full text available online for free

Participation of disabled children and young people in decision-making within social services departments in England

Author:
SOCIAL POLICY RESEARCH UNIT
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Reports the findings of a national survey of social services departments in England which looked at their participation work with disabled children and young people. Information was received from 71 local authorities. The findings cover: the nature of disabled children's participation; the characteristics of children and young people participating; funding and partnership working; feedback; and outcomes. Results suggest that disabled children and young people are being involved in a wide range of decision making, but involvement is still patch and requires further development. The survey forms part of a larger study funded by the Department of Education and Skills Quality Protects Research Initiative.

Journal article

The role of the courts in the development and implementation of the IDEA

Author:
PALLEY Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Social Service Review, 77(4), December 2003, pp.605-618.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press

This article demonstrates the role that courts have played in the development and implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. As a result of limited federal oversight and ambiguities in the law, courts have been influential players in the creation and re-creation of this law. The role of the courts can be seen in the interpretation of such concepts as a free, appropriate public education, medical services, and the least restrictive environment.

Journal article

Integration versus segregation: the experiences of a group of disabled students moving from mainstream school into special needs further education

Authors:
PITT Victoria, CURTAIN M.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(4), June 2004, pp.387-401.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Although the latest education policy for disabled students is one of inclusion, some students are moving out of mainstream schools into specialist colleges for their further education. This research uses a combination of group and individual interviews to explore why this move away from mainstream education is made. Results show that these students' moved into specialist education because of the inadequate physical accessibility of their mainstream colleges, the quality of disability services available to them and their previous experiences whilst in mainstream school. These students were able to identify both strengths and weaknesses within mainstream and special education for disabled students, and believed that educational placement should therefore be a matter of choice depending on the physical, academic and emotional needs of the individual. It would appear, however, that for the students participating in this research, their local mainstream colleges were unable to cater for their needs, indicating that their decision to move into a special needs college was not based on a real choice. Mainstream colleges are challenged to create a truly inclusive environment so that disabled students are offered a real choice.

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