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Journal article Full text available online for free

Children with disabilities, whose responsibility?

Author:
THOMSON Janet
Journal article citation:
Social Work Now: the Practice Journal of Child, Youth and Family, 6, April 1997, pp.6-11.
Publisher:
Child, Youth and Family (Department of Child, Youth and Family Services, Te Tari Awhina I te Tamaiti, te Rangatahi, tae atu ki te Whanau)

Looks at the history and situation in New Zealand with regard to the state's role in caring for children with disabilities, discussing also the roles of institutions, voluntary organisatiions, the community and the Children, Young Persons and their Families Service, ending with guidelines for social workers.

Book

The physically handicapped child: an interdisciplinary approach to management

Editor:
McCARTHY Gillian T.
Publisher:
Faber and Faber
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
375p.,tables,illus.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Day centres for young disabled people

Authors:
KENT Alastair, et al
Publisher:
Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

The layman's guide to restricted growth

Author:
ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH INTO RESTRICTED GROWTH
Publisher:
Association for Research into Restricted Growth
Publication year:
1983
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Review of services for handicapped children

Author:
LAMBETH. Social Services Department
Publisher:
Lambeth. Social Services Department
Publication year:
1983
Pagination:
32p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Getting through to your handicapped child: a handbook

Authors:
NEWSON Elizabeth, HIPGRAVE Tony
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication year:
1982
Pagination:
ix,134p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Cambridge
Book Full text available online for free

Personal assistance for children and adolescents (0-18) with both physical and intellectual impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
30p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of personal assistance for children and adolescents with both physical and intellectual impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Personal assistance is defined as paid support of at least 20 hours per week for people with impairments to enable them to participate in mainstream activities. The report focuses and the methodology used in the review;  Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. The review identified no studies that met the inclusion criteria.

Book

Family based respite care for children with a disability

Author:
KING'S FUND CENTRE
Publisher:
Kings Fund Centre
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
44p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Stability and change in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

Authors:
SUDGEN D. A., CHAMBERS M. E.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(5), September 2007, pp.520-528.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are a heterogeneous group who have a marked impairment in the performance of functional motor skills. Provision for these children is usually made via a paediatrician through occupational or physiotherapy; though with a prevalence rate of 5%, regular provision is rarely possible because of limited professional resources. This study covers a period of nearly 4 years and initially examined a group of 31 children first identified as having DCD at 7–9 years of age. The children were observed and assessed before, during and after a total of 16 weeks of intervention carried out by parents and teachers. This was followed by a period of monitoring of performance for 26 of the children in the motor domain plus other abilities such as educational progress and self-concept. Individual children were tracked using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches, building up longitudinal whole child profiles. Following intervention, 14 of the 26 children have shown improvement and stability in all areas and no longer display DCD symptoms. Eight children have profiles which have shown variability, with the children moving in and out of the DCD classification, while the remaining four children have consistently scored poorly in their movement skills and in addition received ongoing support in school for academic subjects. The study has confirmed that children with DCD show varying profiles over a period of time and that the profiles have distinct characteristics related to events in the child’s life. This approach to examining stability and change in the progressions of children’s difficulties is in keeping with an ecological approach to explaining development with its multilayered influences creating changes.

Journal article

Developmental Coordination Disorder and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome – overlapping disorders? Implications for research and clinical practice

Authors:
MCCLURE I., LE COUTEUR A.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(5), September 2007, pp.513-519.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are two childhood disorders usually identified separately. DCD is a heterogeneous condition with little known of the underlying aetiology of the disorder. This paper examines the potential overlap between DCD and JHS and examines children with DCD for symptoms which may be consistent with a diagnosis of JHS. Implications for research and clinical practice are considered. A questionnaire covering a range of symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of JHS and related autonomic nervous systemic symptoms was completed by parents from 27 children with DCD and compared with responses from parents of 27 typically developing children. Children with DCD showed a significant difference from the group of typically developing children on questions regarding hypermobility, pain and autonomic nervous system symptoms, typifying JHS. This study has shown a similarity in symptoms seen in some DCD children to those with a diagnosis of JHS. In addition, children are also presenting with multi-system symptomatology including those involving the autonomic nervous system. This study reinforces other recent work showing the reverse pattern of JHS children showing similar functional similarities to DCD children. This has implications for future research in DCD in order to understand the underlying aetiology of this complex disorder. In addition, it is important for clinicians to be aware of these findings in order to provide appropriate and tailored support and treatment for children presenting with differing patterns of co-ordination difficulties. Children with DCD and JHS may require appropriate podiatry as well as recognition of their symptoms of pain and how this may affect participation in physical activity.

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