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Journal article

Side by side

Author:
CROSS Merry
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 20.1.94, 1994, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at difficulties in a working relationship that can arise between child protection workers and disability professionals. The main problems result from a power imbalance, ignorance of each others' specialisms and the consequences of society's marginalisation of disability. Suggests co-training as a answer to breaking down the barriers. Looks at what can be gained from such training.

Journal article

The reform of child welfare services in Bulgaria

Authors:
JORDAN Bill, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Europe, 10(2), 2003, pp.14-20.
Publisher:
Russell House

Draws on experiences from an international project, from the work of a child protection agency and from services for endangered, deprived, disadvantaged, and disabled children, to consider how the reform of provision for children (CWR) is occurring in Bulgaria, a country in line to join the EU in 2007. Examines a model being used to try to influence the development of these services, the role of international experts and NGOs, and the case for and against compulsory conditionality in these processes.

Journal article

When play gets serious

Author:
TAYLOR Jennifer
Journal article citation:
Children Now, 28.4.04, 2004, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Haymarket

Looks at the use of play therapy and creative arts to help children deal with their experiences and to express feelings.

Journal article

Identifying children with developmental disabilities receiving child protection services: a national survey of child welfare administrators

Authors:
SHANNON Patrick, AGORASTOU Maria
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 87(3), July 2006, pp.351-357.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of U.S. state child protection service (CPS) agencies to identify children with developmental disabilities who have been maltreated and provide them with services to meet their unique needs. The subjects were 50 state-level child welfare administrators (including the District of Columbia) who were knowledgeable about the data collections requirements in their states. The findings of this study are presented and compared with data collected from two previous studies. Findings indicate that less than one-half of state child welfare agencies identify children with developmental disabilities. The implications of the findings highlight the need for improved data collection procedures, staff and foster care family training regarding disabilities, and improved collaboration with traditional developmental disability-related providers.

Journal article

Approaches to child protection case management for cases involving people with disabilities

Authors:
LIGHTFOOT Elizabeth B., LALIBERTE Traci L.
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse and Neglect, 30(4), April 2006, pp.381-391.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This exploratory study examines the delivery of child protection services by county child protection agencies involving cases with a family member with a disability. Telephone surveys were conducted with the directors or their designees of 89% of the child protection agencies in a Midwestern state. Respondents were asked about the policies and/or procedures for approaching cases involving a person with a disability and the barriers and strengths agencies have in serving people with disabilities. Only 6.7% of respondents reported their agency had a written policy related to serving persons with a disability. There were 18 different approaches to serving clients with a disability within child protection, with the most common being informally teaming for information, dual case assignment, and teaming with an outside consultant. Five counties had specialty workers who were experts in both child protection and disability. Barriers reported varied between rural and non-rural counties, with the most important barriers being lack of resources, lack of knowledge regarding disabilities, systems conflicts, and rural issues, such as lack of providers and lack of transportation. Strengths included accessing and coordinating services, individualizing services, good collaboration and creativity. While few county agencies had any written policies, both formal and informal collaboration is happening at the individual level. The lack of standardization in providing services indicates a need for more attention to issues regarding disability within child protection, including more training for workers, the development of models of collaborative case management and the removal of systemic barriers.

Journal article

The fabrication or induction of illness in children with complex needs: views from practice

Authors:
PRECEY Gretchen, SMITH Karen
Journal article citation:
Practice: Social Work in Action, 16(4), December 2004, pp.283-297.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Examines the vulnerability of disabled children to a particular aspect of child abuse, fabricated or induced illness (also known as Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy). Argues that some of the benign behaviour patterns of families who have a disabled child can be similar to some of the dynamics associated with FII. Looks at how parents of disabled children may use professional networks, manage complex treatment and medication regimes and seek second opinions on their child's condition. Suggests that in most cases these activities are undertaken to benefit the child but warn that professionals must also be aware that some parents may exploit their child's circumstances, resulting in effects on the child that range from a compromise to the welfare of the child to serious harm or even death.

Journal article

Children with disabilities: abuse, neglect, and the child welfare system

Author:
BRUHN Christina M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aggression Maltreatment and Trauma, 8(1/2), 2003, pp.173-203.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Children in out-of-home care due to abuse and neglect are at disproportionately high risk for disabling conditions. The reasons for the over-representation of children with disabilities in the child welfare system are reviewed and discussed in this chapter. Factors discussed include impact of abuse and neglect, the impact risk factors such as exposure to community and domestic violence and poverty, risk of abuse or neglect associated with disability, and child welfare system factors. In addition, the need for greater efficacy in identification of disability, identification of service needs, and linkage with and delivery of services to serve the needs of children with disabilities in out-of-home care is addressed. Recommendations for policy review at State and Federal levels are offered along with direction for future research. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Journal article

The model approach

Authors:
WONNACOTT Jane, KENNEDY Margaret
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 8.3.01, 2001, p.27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

For disabled children to benefit from the new assessment framework, social services departments must get to grips with the fundamental issues from the outset.

Book

This far and no further: towards ending the abuse of disabled children

Authors:
WESTCOTT Helen, CROSS Merry
Publisher:
Venture Press
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
171p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Challenges existing preconceptions about the vulnerability of disabled children and considers what can be changed to decrease the risk of their abuse. Includes sections on: the social setting; disability, abuse and child protection; dependency and independence; institutional abuse of disabled children; communication issues; the professional response; and moving towards change.

Journal article

As easy as ABC

Author:
SONE Kendra
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.12.93, 1993, p.8.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The disability movement has fought to increase awareness of the abuse of disabled children. A new training pack backed by the Department of Health aims to help workers prevent and investigate the abuse of disabled children and young people.

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