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Journal article

A grounded theory of living a life with a physical disability in Taiwan

Authors:
LIN Hsiu-Ching, KNOX Marie, BARR Jennieffer
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 29(6), 2014, pp.968-979.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This study explores the experiences of disability for a number of Taiwanese adults with a physical disability. Using a grounded theory approach, their experiences of living a life with a physical disability were gained through in-depth interviews. The resulting grounded theory ‘it is more than just the impaired body’ presents the dynamic interactions between the participants and the context in which they were living their lives and how they managed their lives within that context. With its inclusion of the cultural dimension, a holistic way of understanding the daily lives of those who experience physical disability in Taiwan is provided. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Personal assistance for adults (19-64) with physical impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
36p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assesses the effectiveness of personal assistance for adults with physical impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Adults with physical impairments living in the community who require assistance to perform tasks of daily living and participate in normal activities due to permanent impairments were included. Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. One randomised controlled trial involving 817 participants compared personal assistance versus usual care met the selection criteria. Findings showed that whilst personal assistance was generally preferred over other services, some people prefer other models of care. Whilst paid assistance probably substitutes for informal care and may cost government more than alternatives, the total costs to recipients and society are currently unknown. Further studies are required to determine which models of personal assistance are most effective and efficient for particular people.

Book

Developmental co-ordination disorder in adults

Author:
DREW Sharon
Publisher:
Whurr
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
163p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Chichester

This textbook provides readers with an insight into Developmental Co-ordination Disorder (DCD) in adulthood and the impact it has on everyday life. Potential areas of difficulty are outlined, together with potential solutions and strategies that can be utilized by individuals to improve their personal, social and working lives.

Book

OPCS surveys of disability in Great Britain: report 1; the prevalence of disability among adults

Authors:
MARTIN Jean, MELTZER Howard, ELLIOT David
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
75p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Personal assistance for adults (19-64) with both physical and intellectual impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
46p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assesses the effectiveness of personal assistance for adults with physical and intellectual impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Adults with permanent physical and intellectual impairments living in the community who require assistance to perform tasks of daily living and participate in everyday activities were included. Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research.  The review identified two studies that met the inclusion criteria, which included 1002 participants. The review found personal assistance may have some benefits for some recipients and their informal caregivers. Paid assistance probably substitutes for informal care and may cost government more than alternatives; however, some evidence suggests it may reduce costs. Further studies are required to determine which models of personal assistance are most effective and efficient for particular people.

Journal article

Parents caring for adult children with physical disabilities: the impact of hope and closeness on caregiving benefits

Authors:
SCHWARTZ Chaya, HADAR Lilit
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 88(2), April 2007, pp.273-281.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

In the present study, the authors examined 82 parents of adult children with physical disabilities from Israel. The parents described the benefits of caregiving, and reported positive feelings about their involvement in caregiving as well as a sense of personal growth as a result of caregiving. When parents perceived caregiving as causing less emotional strain (subjective burden), and when they felt higher levels of closeness with their offspring, and expressed higher levels of hope, they were more likely to indicate that caregiving yielded benefits. In the discussion, the authors focus on the importance of developing closeness and hope among parents who care for their adult offspring with physical disabilities. The implications of this conclusion for social work intervention are also discussed.

Journal article Full text available online for free

It's time to accept help

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 2.3.06, 2006, pp.42-43.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A panel of practitioners give their opinions on the case of a young disabled women who is being looked after at home by her elderly parents. The case highlights the importance of providing support to carers.

Book Full text available online for free

A new vision for adult social care: scoping service users' views

Authors:
HUDSON Bob, DEAREY Melissa, GLENDINNING Caroline
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
42p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

In order to ascertain the ideas and views of service users, the researchers made contact with an extensive list of organisations that represent the interests of service users. The researchers aimed to reflect the entire spectrum of potential users of adult social care services and included organisations representing disabled adults, older people, family carers, drug and alcohol users and other groups of service users.  The paper is in three sections. Section 1 looks at the desired outcomes of a new approach from the perspective of users of services. Section 2 identifies the service principles that would underpin the accomplishment of the outcomes identified in Section 1. Section 3 identifies some implementation issues concerned with matters of structure and process.

Journal article Full text available online for free

From child care to adult care

Author:
DOW John
Journal article citation:
MCC Building Knowledge for Integrated Care, 10(1), February 2002, pp.32-34.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Looks at the division between child care and adult care services. It considers aspects of the legal framework which are different for adults and children and asks what changes could be made to improve co-ordination between agencies. Asks whether there are lessons that can be learnt by adult services from children's services and vice versa.

Journal article

Exploring the effects of group therapy for the visually impaired

Authors:
NAYLOR Paige D., LABBE Elise E
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 35(1), 2017, pp.18-28.
Publisher:
Sage

Individuals with visual impairments may experience varying levels of stress due to their vision loss. This study investigated the effectiveness of a brief stress management group therapy intervention for visually impaired individuals. The measure for evaluating participants’ stress levels was the Calgary Symptoms of Stress Inventory (C-SOSI), and overall well-being was measured via the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). The study evaluated 36 participants, all experiencing varying levels of vision loss, recruited from a regional vision rehabilitation centre. Approximately half of the participants were men (16) and half were women (20). The mean age of participants was 48.2 years (standard deviation [SD] = 12.9 years). This was a predominately African American sample (72%). The C-SOSI was administered before and after participation in an 8-week stress management group. The ORS was administered at every session. Well-being was significantly increased during the first round of the intervention (p = .02). No statistically significant decreases for stress during the first round of the intervention were observed. Those that enrolled in the intervention for a second round of treatment had a significant decrease for stress (p = .001), but not for well-being. Overall, hypotheses were partially supported. Stress scores decreased during both rounds of the intervention; a significant reduction in stress scores was found for those individuals in the second round of the intervention. Well-being also increased during both rounds of the intervention; a significant increase was found only for the first round of the intervention. These results may suggest that individuals need approximately 16 weeks of the intervention to experience significant reductions in their stress levels. The results and implications of the current treatment protocol are discussed. (Edited publisher abstract)

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