Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"physical disabilities"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 12

Book Full text available online for free

Hate crime: public statement on prosecuting disability hate crime and other crimes against disabled people

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Crown Prosecution Service
Publisher:
Crown Prosecution Service
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
11
Place of publication:
London

A policy statement from the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) which explains how they deal with and prosecute disability hate crime and other crimes against disabled people, and what support victims and witnesses can expect from the CPS. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Taking on choice and control in personal care and support: the experiences of physically disabled young adults

Authors:
MITCHELL Wendy, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work, 17(4), 2017, pp.413-433.
Publisher:
Sage

This article reports physically disabled young adults’ experiences of self-directed care. The study carried conducted semi-structured interviews with young adults aged 19-29 years with a range of congenital and acquired impairments. The results found many aspects of interviewees’ experiences of self-directed care appeared to be influenced by their limited life experience, the fact they are still developing life-skills and are a minority group within adult social care. Interviewees identified their lack of life experience and self-confidence as making them cautious in assuming responsibility for their care arrangements and, typically, their desire for on-going parental support. They also believed their age and life stage contributed to difficulties managing carers and PAs. Preferences around characteristics of carers/PAs were influenced by their age and desire to integrate into mainstream activities. Information provided by statutory services did not (fully) acknowledge that some users were young adults. Compared to other physically disabled users of adult social care, young adults’ under-developed life-skills and lack of life experience influences their experiences as users, and the support they needed to assume control of their care arrangements. Tailored information and support for this ‘minority group’ is required. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

“Kids like me, we go lightly on the head”: experiences of children with a visual impairment on the physical self-concept

Authors:
DE SCHIPPER Tessa, LIEBERMAN Lauren J., MOODY Brigitte
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 35(1), 2017, pp.55-68.
Publisher:
Sage

There has been limited research published investigating the experiences of the children with a visual impairment in physical activity and sports. The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of children with a visual impairment on their physical self-concept (PSC). A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was employed to investigate the experiences of children with a visual impairment. Qualitative interviews were conducted with six children between 10 and 12 years, followed by a thematic content analysis. Within the framework of the PSC, four themes emerged: (1) adaptations, (2) friends, (3) bullying, and (4) eyes and glasses. Findings suggest that children with a visual impairment despite the occurrence of bullying or lack of adaptations in sports of physical activity are satisfied with their physical self and global self-esteem. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Habilitation provision for children and young people with vision impairment in the United Kingdom: a lack of clarity leading to inconsistencies

Author:
HOGG Kat
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 35(1), 2017, pp.44-54.
Publisher:
Sage

The key to empowering and supporting children and young people (CYP) with vision impairment (VI) to achieve their potential lies in the delivery of habilitation training. Evidence has revealed that provision of habilitation services across the United Kingdom was inconsistent, with CYP with VI not receiving services in some areas. This research explored the accessibility and quality of habilitation provision for CYP with VI via two studies: (1) 12 qualitative case studies of habilitation practice and (2) surveys of habilitation training experiences, with CYP with VI (n = 43) and with parents of CYP with VI (n = 68). Five themes were identified highlighting inconsistencies and variability in the delivery of habilitation training in recent years, a lack of focus on independent living skills training, on social inclusion and emotional well-being, a lack of support for parents and a lack of clarity with regard to the definition of habilitation, and who is responsible for providing training. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Exploring the effects of group therapy for the visually impaired

Authors:
NAYLOR Paige D., LABBE Elise E
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Visual Impairment, 35(1), 2017, pp.18-28.
Publisher:
Sage

Individuals with visual impairments may experience varying levels of stress due to their vision loss. This study investigated the effectiveness of a brief stress management group therapy intervention for visually impaired individuals. The measure for evaluating participants’ stress levels was the Calgary Symptoms of Stress Inventory (C-SOSI), and overall well-being was measured via the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). The study evaluated 36 participants, all experiencing varying levels of vision loss, recruited from a regional vision rehabilitation centre. Approximately half of the participants were men (16) and half were women (20). The mean age of participants was 48.2 years (standard deviation [SD] = 12.9 years). This was a predominately African American sample (72%). The C-SOSI was administered before and after participation in an 8-week stress management group. The ORS was administered at every session. Well-being was significantly increased during the first round of the intervention (p = .02). No statistically significant decreases for stress during the first round of the intervention were observed. Those that enrolled in the intervention for a second round of treatment had a significant decrease for stress (p = .001), but not for well-being. Overall, hypotheses were partially supported. Stress scores decreased during both rounds of the intervention; a significant reduction in stress scores was found for those individuals in the second round of the intervention. Well-being also increased during both rounds of the intervention; a significant increase was found only for the first round of the intervention. These results may suggest that individuals need approximately 16 weeks of the intervention to experience significant reductions in their stress levels. The results and implications of the current treatment protocol are discussed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Examining more inclusive approaches to social work, physical disability, and sexuality

Authors:
KATTARI Shanni K., TURNER George W.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 16(1), 2017, pp.38-53.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

People with disabilities often experience the idea that those with disabilities are not, or should not be, sexual beings. This article examines how people with physical disabilities define sexual activity, their levels of sexual satisfaction, group differences in how people define different acts as sexual activities, and the differences in levels of sexual satisfaction. Additionally, this study (N = 450) looks at the correlations between levels of independence in multiple contexts. Levels of independence are also assessed in relationship to severity of disability and sexual satisfaction. Implications for social work and social service practice, education, and policy are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The relationship of person-environment fit to perceptions of autonomy, competency and satisfaction among older adults with developmental disabilities

Authors:
HUTCHINGS B. Lynn, CHAPLIN Erica
Journal article citation:
Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 14(3), 2017, pp.214-223.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The overlay of age-related cognitive and physical impairments onto existing intellectual and physical disabilities, a paucity of informal social relationships, a limited education and low income levels place the current generation of ageing adults with intellectual disabilities at risk of premature behavioural limitations and increased dependency. Person-environment fit and its relationship to perceptions of autonomy, competency, and satisfaction were explored through qualitative data collected from consumers. Face-to-face, in home interviews were conducted with 91 consumers who were asked to assess their own ability to carry out self-care and household tasks. Interviewers then observed consumers performing these tasks. A multi-stage data analysis process identified emergent themes that included issues related to autonomy versus dependence, belonging versus isolation, residential permanency versus transience, and social inclusion versus exclusion. The study also collected quantitative data, both from consumers and interviewers acting as observers. Consumer ratings of their own ability were consistently lower than observer ratings. Fostering home-based independence and autonomy among people ageing with developmental disabilities are discussed in relation to perspectives on the home environment. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mothers with physical disabilities caring for young children

Authors:
JACOB Jean, KIRSHBAUM Megan, PRESTON Paul
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 16(2), 2017, pp.95-119.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Seventy-one U.S. mothers with a physical disability who had a child aged 0 to 3 years responded to a survey about the system of care used for their child. Results indicated that mothers participated in all different types of care (physical, comforting, playing, limit setting, and taking the child outside the home). Partners and participants’ mothers provided the most assistance with care. Mothers were generally satisfied with assistance received from others. This article explores how mothers remain central to their children with others assisting with the child’s care and the impact of such assistance on mothers’ relationships with partners and children. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Workplace stress, burnout and coping: a qualitative study of the experiences of Australian disability support workers

Authors:
JUDD Megan J., et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 25(3), 2017, pp.1109-1117.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aim of this study was to explore disability support workers' (DSWs) perceptions of enjoyable and challenging aspects of disability support work, sources of stress and burnout and the strategies they use to cope when these issues arise. Twelve DSWs workers providing support for adults living with intellectual and physical disabilities were interviewed. Thematic analysis revealed a superordinate theme of ‘Balance’ comprising three sub-themes: 'Balancing Negatives and Positives', 'Periods of Imbalance', and 'Strategies to Reclaim Balance'. Participants spoke of the rewarding and uplifting times in their job such as watching a client learn new skills and being shown appreciation. These moments were contrasted by emotionally and physically draining aspects of their work, including challenging client behaviour, earning a low income, and having limited power to make decisions. Participants described periods of imbalance, wherein the negatives of their job outweighed the positives, resulting in stress and sometimes burnout. Participants often had to actively seek support and tended to rely on their own strategies to manage stress. Findings suggest that organisational support together with workplace interventions that support DSWs to perceive the positive aspects of their work, such as acceptance and mindfulness-based approaches, may help to limit experiences of stress and burnout. The further development and evaluation of emotion-focused workplace therapies, and interventions that consider organisational (macro) factors is suggested. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The impact of personalisation on people from Chinese backgrounds: qualitative accounts of social care experience

Authors:
IRVINE Fiona, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 25(3), 2017, pp.878-887.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The limited research that considers people from black and minority ethnic communities' experiences of personalisation tends to focus on personal budgets rather than personalisation per se. This article provides an opportunity to hear the voices of people from Chinese backgrounds and their experiences of personalisation. The study used individual semi-structured interviews and focus groups to collect data from physically disabled people from Chinese backgrounds who lived in England, were aged between 18 and 70, and received social care. Data were analysed using an iterative and thematic approach, with early analysis informing the subsequent analytical rounds. The findings reveal that personalisation has the potential to transform the lives of people from Chinese backgrounds, especially when tailored support is available for people to understand and access personal budgets and put them to creative use. However, the impact of personalisation is barely evident because few eligible individuals access personal budgets or participate in co-production. This is related to a lack of encouragement for service users to become genuine partners in understanding, designing, commissioning and accessing a diverse range of social care services to meet their cultural and social care needs. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts