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Journal article

Strategic approaches to disability disclosure on social media

Authors:
FURR June B., CARREIRO Alexis, McARTHUR John A.
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 31(10), 2016, pp.1353-1368.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Persons with physical disabilities often face isolation in face-to-face settings or limited opportunities to form relationships due to an ongoing, and often derogatory, disability narrative of difference. Unlike face-to-face interactions, social media let persons with disabilities control how and when they disclose information about their disabilities and offer new opportunities for relationship formation. This qualitative study establishes a theoretical framework for exploring how and why persons with physical disabilities choose to disclose their disabilities on social media platforms. Major findings from the study describe three strategic approaches (open, secure, and limited) to disability disclosure on social media. The study also examines the relationship between age of discloser and age of the disability as key factors in approach selection. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social participation of teenagers and young adults with developmental co-ordination disorder and strategies that could help them: results from a scoping review

Authors:
GAGNON-ROY M., JASMIN E., CAMDEN C.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 42(6), 2016, pp.840-851.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: The impact of developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) on teenagers' and young adults' participation is not well documented. This article aims to synthesize the current knowledge on social participation, which is the performance of an individual in realizing his or her daily activities and social roles within its life environment. Strategies and interventions to support youths (15–25 years old) with DCD were also synthesized. Methods: A scoping review interrogating three databases and using ‘snowballing techniques’ was performed to identify both scientific and grey literature published between 2004 and 2014. Over 1000 documents were screened and 57 were read in full; 28 met inclusion criteria. A charting form based on 12 life habits described in the disability creation process and developed by two reviewers was used to extract data and report the results. Results: All life habits were reported to be affected for teenagers and young adults with DCD, with education and interpersonal relationships being the most frequently discussed. During adolescence and adulthood, new tasks and subsequent difficulties emerge, such as driving. Mental health difficulties emerged as a key theme. Few strategies and interventions were described to support social participation of youths with DCD. Conclusion: Many life habits are challenging for youths with DCD, but few evidence-based strategies and interventions have been designed to help them to increase their social participation. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Working through physical disability in psychoanalytic psychotherapy with an adolescent boy

Authors:
FLOROU Aliki, et al
Journal article citation:
Psychoanalytic Social Work, 23(2), 2016, pp.119-129.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The narcissistic injury that may be caused by physical disability in infancy and the possible familial traumatization may block the integration of the infant's body and self-image, and can consequently hinder the child's identity formation. This article presents how an adolescent boy with cerebral palsy in short-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy works through the mental impact of his physical disability using a story. Transference and countertransference reactions are discussed. The positive impact of short-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy highlights the importance of caring for the mental health of children with physical impairments. (Publisher abstract)

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Local authority registers of people with disabilities, Wales, 31 March 2016

Author:
WALES. Welsh Government. Knowledge and Analytical Services
Publisher:
Welsh Government
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
11
Place of publication:
Cardiff

Statistical release summarising information on people with disabilities registered with local authorities in Wales at 31 March 2016. Data covers the number of people with learning disabilities on local authority registers, with details of placement by accommodation type and age; and numbers of people with physical disabilities, hearing or sensory impairment on local authority registers. The summary reports shows that 14,729 people were registered with learning disabilities in Wales, and of these 86 per cent were living in community placements and 14 per cent were in residential care. Over half of people with learning disabilities on registers were living with parents or family. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Assistive tools for disability arts: collaborative experiences in working with disabled artists and stakeholders

Author:
CREED Chris
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 10(2), 2016, pp.121-129.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the experiences in working collaboratively with physically impaired visual artists and other stakeholders (e.g. disability arts organisations, charities, personal assistants, special needs colleges, assistive technologists, etc.) to explore the potential of digital assistive tools to support and transform practice. Design/methodology/approach: The authors strategically identified key organisations as project partners including Disability Arts Shropshire, Arts Council England, the British Council, SCOPE, and National Star College (a large special needs college). This multi-disciplinary team worked together to develop relationships with disabled artists and to collaboratively influence the research focus around investigating the current practice of physically impaired artists and the impact of digital technologies on artistic work. Findings: The collaborations with disabled artists and stakeholders throughout the research process have enriched the project, broadened and deepened research impact, and enabled a firsthand understanding of the issues around using assistive technology for artistic work. Artists and stakeholders have become pro-active collaborators and advocates for the project as opposed to being used only for evaluation purposes. A flexible research approach was crucial in helping to facilitate research studies and enhance impact of the work. Originality/value: This paper is the first to discuss experiences in working with physically impaired visual artists – including the benefits of a collaborative approach and the considerations that must be made when conducting research in this area. The observations are also relevant to researchers working with disabled participants in other fields. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors associated with the amount of public home care received by elderly and intellectually disabled individuals in a large Norwegian municipality

Authors:
DOHL Oystein, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 24(3), 2016, pp.297-308.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study reports an analysis of factors associated with home care use in a setting in which long-term care services are provided within a publicly financed welfare system. The study considered two groups of home care recipients: elderly individuals and intellectually disabled individuals. Routinely collected data on users of public home care in the municipality of Trondheim in October 2012, including 2493 people aged 67 years or older and 270 intellectually disabled people, were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the relationship between the time spent in direct contact with recipients by public healthcare personnel and perceived individual determinants of home care use (i.e. physical disability, cognitive impairment, diagnoses, age and gender, as well as socioeconomic characteristics). Physical disability and cognitive impairment are routinely registered for long-term care users through a standardised instrument that is used in all Norwegian municipalities. Factor analysis was used to aggregate the individual items into composite variables that were included as need variables. Both physical disability and cognitive impairment were strong predictors of the amount of received care for both elderly and intellectually disabled individuals. The study identified a negative interaction effect between physical disability and cognitive impairment for elderly home care users. For elderly individuals, results also found significant positive associations between weekly hours of home care and having comorbidity, living alone, living in a service flat and having a safety alarm. The reduction in the amount of care for elderly individuals living with a cohabitant was substantially greater for males than for females. For intellectually disabled individuals, receiving services involuntarily due to severe behavioural problems was a strong predictor of the amount of care received. The analysis showed that routinely collected data capture important predictors of home care use and thus facilitate both short-term budgeting and long-term planning of home care services. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Closing the disability and employment gap: a case study report

Author:
VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS DISABILITY GROUP
Publisher:
Voluntary Organisations Disability Group
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

In response to the recent green paper on work, health and disability, this report outlines some practical solutions to closing the disability employment gap. It highlights why it is important that action is taken now and the looks at the challenges that could undermine these aims. These include austerity measures and changes to specialist employment policy. The report then presents three brief examples of successful employment and training schemes delivered by specialist disability organisations. They cover the areas of: supported employment schemes and social enterprise; disability organisations leading by example and employing disabled people; and supported internships and specialist further education. The report includes recommendations for government, employers and care providers to boost employment for working-age disabled people. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Improving the well-being of disabled young people

Authors:
KELLY Grace, KELLY Bernie, MACDONALD Geraldine
Publisher:
Queen's University Belfast. Institute of Child Care Research
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
127
Place of publication:
Belfast

Drawing on the views of 37 young disabled people in Northern Ireland, this report looks at how they feel about their own well-being and how they experience everyday life. The report identifies common triggers for positive and negative feelings and highlights opportunities for improving well-being. Participants were between 10 and 24 years of age and included young people with physical and learning and communication difficulties. The report provides an overview of the policy landscape, discusses the concept of subjective well-being, the role it plays in contributing to the quality of life and ways of measuring subjective well-being. Drawing on interviews, the report discusses the findings in the following areas: the extent to which adolescents are satisfied with their life; how their experiences contribute to the conditions that can enhance or diminish well-being; and the factors that young people feel are most important for building their capability to enjoy a happy and fulfilled life. Key messages include: the need to protect disabled young people and their families from poverty; the importance of formal sources of participation for social interaction in improving well-being; and how involvement of young people with particular needs in the design stages of programmes can overcome barriers to participation. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Canadian power mobility device users' experiences of ageing with mobility impairments

Authors:
KOROTCHENKO Alexandra, CLARKE Laura Hurd
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 36(6), 2016, pp.1238-1253.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

In this article, the authors draw upon interviews with 14 men and 15 women aged 51–92 to examine the embodied experiences of Canadian power mobility device users. In particular, they investigate how individuals ageing with mobility impairments perceived and experienced the practical impacts and symbolic cultural connotations of utilising a power mobility device. The findings reveal that those participants who had begun to use their power mobility devices later in life were dismayed by and apprehensive about the significance of their diminishing physical abilities in the context of the societal privileging of youthful and able bodies. At the same time, the participants who had used a power mobility device from a young age were fearful of prospective bodily declines, and discussed the significance and consequences of being unable to continue to operate their power mobility devices autonomously in the future. The authors consider the ways in which the participants attempted to manage, mitigate and reframe their experiences of utilising power mobility devices in discriminatory environments. The authors discuss their findings in relation to on-going theoretical debates pertaining to the concepts of ‘biographical disruption’ and the third and fourth ages. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The subjective well-being of parents of children with developmental disabilities: the role of hope as predictor and fosterer of well-Being

Author:
GOLAN-SHENAAR Vered
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 15(2), 2016, pp.77-95.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The purpose of this study was to identify factors that can improve the subjective well-being (SWB) of parents of children with a developmental disability, expand the knowledge relating to the role of hope in their lives, and improve the extent to which parent appraisals of the influence of the disability (on the couple's relationship, family functioning, and personal development) moderate this association. Participants were a convenience sample of 114 Jewish Israeli parents of children with DD living in their parents’ home. The children ranged in age from 6 to 21. All the children were formally recognised by the State of Israel's Department of Welfare as being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disabilities (ID), or physical disabilities (PD). The results revealed that parental SWB was below the societal average; however, it differed significantly across levels of parent appraisals of their child's disability. Findings from this study point to the importance of hope to improve parental SWB. (Edited publisher abstract)

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