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Digital Media Full text available online for free

Fluctuating needs: the Care Act 2014

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
6 minutes 56 seconds
Place of publication:
London

Under the Care Act 2014, assessments should reflect more accurately a comprehensive picture of people's needs - including how they change over time. In this film two people, one with mental health needs, the other with a physical disability, talk about their conditions, assessment, how their needs can fluctuate and the impact this has on the level of care and support they need. The film illustrates how the new requirement aims to recognise people as individuals by endorsing a much-needed degree of flexibility and responsive care, as well as offering valuable support for people with mental health and physical health conditions which may vary over time. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Local authority registers of people with disabilities, Wales, 31 March 2015

Author:
JONES Robin
Publisher:
WALES. Welsh Government. Knowledge and Analytical Services
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
9
Place of publication:
Cardiff

Statistical release summarising information on people with disabilities registered with local authorities in Wales at 31 March 2015. Data covers registers of people with learning disabilities, with breakdown by accommodation type and age; and registers of people with physical or sensory disabilities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

A systematic review of instruments for assessment of capacity in activities of daily living in children with developmental co-ordination disorder

Authors:
LINDE B.W.van der, et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 41(1), 2015, pp.23-34.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) face evident motor difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL). Assessment of their capacity in ADL is essential for diagnosis and intervention, in order to limit the daily consequences of the disorder. The aim of this study is to systematically review potential instruments for standardized and objective assessment of children's capacity in ADL, suited for children with DCD. As a first step, databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched to identify studies that described instruments with potential for assessment of capacity in ADL. Second, instruments were included for review when two independent reviewers agreed that the instruments (1) are standardized and objective; (2) assess at activity level and comprise items that reflect ADL; and (3) are applicable to school-aged children that can move independently. Out of 1507 publications, 66 publications were selected, describing 39 instruments. Seven of these instruments were found to fulfil the criteria and were included for review: the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Performance-2 (BOT2); the Do-Eat (Do-Eat); the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (MABC2); the school-Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (schoolAMPS); the Tuffts Assessment of Motor Performance (TAMP); the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD); and the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). As a third step, for the included instruments, suitability for children with DCD was discussed based on the ADL comprised, ecological validity and other psychometric properties. It is concluded that current instruments do not provide comprehensive and ecologically valid assessment of capacity in ADL as required for children with DCD. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Taking on and taking over: choice and control for physically disabled young adults

Authors:
MITCHELL Wendy, et al
Publisher:
NIHR School for Social Care Research
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

Summarises the findings of a study on approaches to supporting physically disabled young adults to achieve their preferred levels of control over care and support arrangements. The study took place between July 2012 and January 2014 and involved semi-structured interviews with young adults, parents and social care professionals. It examined physically disabled young adults experiences of managing their care and support arrangements and explored how they can be better supported. Key findings and practice implications are included. While welcoming the opportunities afforded by personalised approaches within adult social care, almost all the young adults described feeling daunted by the associated responsibilities, with managing personal assistants/carers consistently identified as the most difficult aspect of having a Direct Payment. Young adults found information from statutory services was typically targeted at other audiences, for example, older people and only a minority believed transition planning/support services had played a significant role in preparing them for taking on a Personal Budget. Social workers with more experience of working with young adults identified specific issues that need to be accommodated including: young adults’ relative lack of life skills and experience; young adults’ preferences regarding parental involvement; and addressing parents’ support needs. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

CASP-19 special section: how does chronic disease status affect CASP quality of life at older ages? examining the WHO ICF disability domains as mediators of this relationship

Authors:
SEXTON E., et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 19(7), 2015, pp.622-633.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: The effect of chronic disease status on quality of life (QoL) has been well established. However, less is known about how chronic diseases affect QoL. This article examines impairment in three domains of the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Health and Disability (ICF) – body function, activity and participation, as well as affective well-being, – as potential mediators of the relationship between chronic disease and QoL. Method: A cross-sectional sample (n = 4961) of the general Irish community-dwelling population aged 50+ years was obtained from the Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA). The CASP measure of QoL was examined as two dimensions – control/autonomy and self-realisation/pleasure. Structural equation modelling was used to test the direct and indirect effects of chronic disease on QoL, via variables capturing body function, activity, participation and positive affect. Results: A factor analysis showed that indicators of body function and activity loaded onto a single overall physical impairment factor. This physical impairment factor fully mediated the effect of chronic disease on positive affect and QoL. The total effect of chronic disease on control/autonomy (−0.160) was primarily composed of an indirect effect via physical impairment (−0.86), and via physical impairment and positive affect (−0.45). The decomposition of effects on self-realisation/pleasure was similar, although the direct effect of physical impairment was weaker. The model fitted the data well (RMSEA = 0.02, TLI = 0.96, CFI = 0.96). Conclusion: Chronic disease affects QoL through increased deficits in physical body function and activity. This overall physical impairment affects QoL both directly and indirectly via reduced positive affect. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Profiling the population of disabled children and young people in out-of-home care in Northern Ireland

Authors:
KELLY Berni, DOWLING Sandra, WINTER Karen
Publishers:
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland. Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
99
Place of publication:
Belfast

This report presents an analysis of the profile of the population of disabled looked after children (LAC) and young people in NI across two distinct groups: 323 disabled fully LAC (living away from home on a full time basis) and 164 disabled children and young people looked after due to short breaks. It is the second phase of a wider study on the characteristics and experiences of disabled children and young people looked after in Northern Ireland. The report examines the demographic characteristics of the population; family background; looked after experience, such as reason for entry to care and placement type; safeguarding; education; access to mental health services and transitional support. It finds that the total of 323 disabled fully LAC represents 11.2% of the total LAC population, showing that disabled children and young people continue to be overrepresented in the LAC population (7% of the general child population in NI being disabled). Those who are fully LAC will have come into care because they cannot remain in their birth family home, often due to child protection concerns. Short break LAC are engaged with short breaks for family support reasons as well as a social and developmental opportunities for the child (although there are safeguarding issues for some). (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The stability of coping strategies in older adults with osteoarthritis and the ability of these strategies to predict changes in depression, disability, and pain

Authors:
REGIER Natalie G., PARMELEE Patricia A.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 19(12), 2015, pp.1113-1122.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Given the chronically painful, incurable nature of osteoarthritis, effective cognitive and behavioural coping strategies may be critical for older adults with the disease. Little is known about how and why coping changes over time, nor about stability of coping strategies in persons with osteoarthritis. The aims of this work were to examine the structure of coping in older adults with osteoarthritis, the association of coping strategies with well-being, the stability of coping over time, and its association with changes in well-being over the same period. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The heart of the matter

Author:
PARTON Dan
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 15(3), May/June 2015, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Ridgeway, a supported living service for four young people with a range of physical and learning disabilities, was rated 'outstanding by the Care Quality Commission under the CQC's new inspection system. The article looks some of the factors that contribute to the success of the service which aims to put the people it supports at the heart of everything it does: supporting its residents to find employment; planning goals with residents and their families; matching staff and residents who have similar interests; involving residents in the induction of new staff. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Higher risk of violence exposure in men and women with physical or sensory disabilities results from a public health survey

Authors:
OLOFSSON Niclas, LINDQVIST Kent, DANIELSSON Ingela
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 30(10), 2015, pp.1671-1686.
Publisher:
Sage

The World Health Organization has declared that violence is a global public health problem. The prevalence of violence exposure among adults with intellectual and unspecific disabilities has been demonstrated in several studies, whereas only a few articles on people with sensory disabilities have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk for exposure to physical violence, psychological offence, or threats of violence in people with physical and/or sensory disabilities, compared with people with no such disabilities, controlling for socioeconomic data. Data from a public health survey were analysed. A nationally representative sample of women and men aged 16 to 84 years had answered a questionnaire. In the present study, the whole sample, comprised of 25,461 women and 21,545 men, was used. Women with auditory disabilities were generally more often violence exposed than non-disabled women, whereas men with physical disabilities were more often violence exposed than non-impaired men. Some age groups among both women and men with visual disabilities had higher prevalence rates than women and men without disabilities. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were significantly higher among the auditory impairment group for exposure to physical and psychological violence among women. Men with physical disabilities had raised odds ratios for physical violence and psychological violence compared with the non-disabled group. Both men and women with a physical or sensory disability showed higher odds of being exposed to violence than men and women without a disability. The results indicated that socioeconomic situation, smoking, and hazardous drinking strengthened the association between impairment and violence. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

An exploratory study of a computer-assisted abuse awareness and safety planning program for men with disabilities: the Men's Safer and Stronger Program

Authors:
OSCHWALD Mary, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 14(2), 2015, pp.88-109.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Interpersonal violence (IPV) is a serious and often unrecognized problem for men with disabilities (MWD). However, abuse awareness programs and outcome measures have not been systematically evaluated in MWD. This article reports findings from an exploratory study (n = 31) of the Safer and Stronger Program for Men with Disabilities (Men's SSP), an audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) abuse awareness programme. The study aimed to examine the sensitivity of the Men's SSP ACASI and its embedded self-reflective items for measuring IPV experience of MWD, and to collect preliminary data on the reliability of a battery of safety- and abuse-related measures when completed by MWD. Most men participating in the study reported multiple disabilities, the most frequent being intellectual or cognitive disabilities, mobility or physical disabilities, and mental health disabilities. Preliminary findings suggest the programme is sensitive toward detecting abuse and it allows MWD to privately and independently self-identify IPV experiences. Preliminary psychometric data on a battery of abuse and safety awareness outcome measures suggest that they are reliable in this population. (Publisher abstract)

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