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Journal article

Who is willing to foster children with disabilities?

Authors:
ORME John G., CHERRY Donna J., KRCEK Taylor E.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Child Welfare, 7(5), 2013, pp.566-585.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Children with disabilities represent a significant and increasing proportion of children in foster care. Using a US national sample of 304 foster mothers two groups of mothers were identified. One group willing to foster children with any type of disability except HIV/AIDS (51%) (Unconditional mothers), and a second group who were more selective (49%) (Selective mothers). Unconditional mothers fostered longer, fostered more children, and had more foster children in their homes. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Care home census 2013: statistics on adult residents in care homes in Scotland

Publishers:
ISD Scotland, Information Services Division, NHS National Services Scotland
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
35
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This publication presents information on adult residents in Care Homes in Scotland collected as part of the annual Scottish Care Home Census (SCHC) held at 31st March 2013. The census covers all adult care homes in Scotland that are registered with the Care Inspectorate and data are collected via the Care Inspectorate’s web based “eForms” system. The report also includes care homes for older people, and care homes for other main client groups (adults with physical disabilities, adults with mental health problems or adults with learning disabilities). As at 31st March 2013 there were 1,282 care homes for adults in Scotland providing 42,755 places to 36,578 residents. This report notes that for the 2011 census, ISD Scotland (Ihe Information Services Division of NHS National Services Scotland) published two reports: an interim report and a detailed findings report. For the 2012 census onwards, ISD has produced a single annual report. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Good sports

Author:
PENFOLD Julie
Journal article citation:
Learning Disability Today, 13(5), September/October 2013, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Sports Buddy is a new initiative in West Yorkshire that aims to help people with learning and physical disabilities to become more active with the short-term help of a non-disabled sports buddy. The scheme is funded by Kirkless Council's community partnerships department and is being delivered by two charities - the Communities United project and the Meltham Sports and Community Group.This article explains how the scheme works. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The impact of switching on family caregivers of children with cerebral palsy

Authors:
NICOLSON Amy, MOIR LOIS, MILSTEED Jeannine
Journal article citation:
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 8(2), 2013, pp.169-175.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Purpose: This study aimed to enhance our knowledge and understanding of switching, as assistive technology, and how it impacts on family caregivers of children with cerebral palsy with GMFCS levels four or five. Methods: A qualitative method using a constructivist approach was adopted. Purposive sampling was used to recruit five caregivers to participants in this study. Framework analysis was applied to the data collection of semistructured interviews conducted with each caregiver. Findings: The three main themes identified were an investment in the future, resulting in joy and hope. The learning process of switching is resource intensive, time consuming and effortful for caregivers. If caregivers do not perceive this as an investment, then they may not experience the joy switching can bring to their child, and in turn the joy, hope, and caregiver satisfaction it can offer for the future. Conclusion: This research indicates that caregivers often have the greatest impact on whether switching will be adopted in the home. The greatest impact on caregivers is related to their perception on the competence of therapists and coordination of services provided. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Quality of life among disabled older adults without cognitive impairment and its relation to attendance in day care centres

Authors:
IECOVICH Esther, BIDERMAN Aya
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 33(4), 2013, pp.627-643.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Day care centres intend to improve the quality of life of disabled older adults. The aims of the paper are to: (a) examine the extent to which users of day care centres experience higher levels of quality of life compared to their peers who are non-users; and (b) to explore the relationships between the length of use and frequency of weekly attendance at day care centres and quality of life. This is a case-control study with a sample of 817 respondents, of whom 417 were users of day care centres and 400 were non-users, matched by age, gender and family physician. The study was conducted in 12 day care centres in the southern region of Israel. Data collection included face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Quality of life was found to be significantly related to the use of day care centres, but length and frequency of attendance were insignificant in explaining quality of life among users of day care centres. The study demonstrated that users of day care centres have a higher quality of life, but in a cross-sectional study we cannot prove causality. Therefore, more research using quasi-experimental and longitudinal research designs is necessary to assess causality between use and attendance at day care centres on users' quality of life. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Developing mental health occupational therapy practice to meet the needs of people with mental health problems and physical disability

Authors:
MILES Helen, MORLEY Mary
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 76(12), 2013, pp.556-559.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

It is well documented and evidenced that individuals with serious mental illness have an increased risk of developing a range of physical illnesses and conditions. This practice analysis describes how an initial audit of mental health occupational therapists identified a lack of clarity and protocols around working with individuals with associated physical conditions. Local joint care pathways and a skills development programme were introduced, and a follow-up audit completed to assess progress to date. The advancement in practice and production of a clear physical care pathway has made a positive difference to service users. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Evaluation of an agency-based occupational therapy intervention to facilitate aging in place

Authors:
SHEFFIELD Chava, SMITH Charles A., BECKER Mary
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 53(6), 2013, pp.907-918.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Purpose: The United States faces a growing population of older adults and accompanying functional disabilities, coupled with constrained public resources and diminishing informal supports. A variety of interventions that aim to improve client outcomes have been studied, but to date, there is limited translational research that examines the efficacy of moving such interventions from clinical trials to agency settings. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate a restorative occupational therapy intervention relative to “usual care” among community-dwelling older adults. The intervention included a detailed assessment from a person–environment perspective and provision of adaptive equipment and home modifications where appropriate. The intervention (n = 31) and control groups (n = 29) were evaluated at 3 months and assessed for changes in functional status, home safety, falls, health-related quality of life (HRQoL; EQ5D), depression, social support, and fear of falling; a 4 subgroup analysis also examined outcomes by waiting list status. An informal economic evaluation compared the intervention to usual care. Results: Findings indicated improvements in home safety (p < .0005, b = −15.87), HRQoL (p = .03, b = 0.08), and fear of falling (p < .05, b = 2.22). Findings did not show improvement in functional status or reduction in actual falls. The intervention resulted in a 39% reduction in recommended hours of personal care, which if implemented, could result in significant cost savings. Implications: The study adds to the growing literature of occupational therapy interventions for older adults, and the findings support the concept that restorative approaches can be successfully implemented in public agencies. (Publisher abstract)

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Workforce planning to achieve person-centred support

Authors:
VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS DISABILITY GROUP, ENHAM TRUST
Publisher:
Voluntary Organisations Disability Group
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

Workforce planning to achieve person-centred support’ offers unique insights into the employment challenges facing social care providers. It describes how Voluntary Organisations Disability Group (VODG) member Enham Trust developed a workforce to support personalisation and person-centred care. The steps taken to change the workforce include: comprehensive re-assessment with individuals in relation to their hourly needs for care and support; aggregating the core hours required to deliver safe personal care and analysing how much of the time remaining available could be used “flexibly”; consulting staff about contracts; embedding principles of personalisation, for example, through a series of training workshops; changing job specifications, titles and content, from that of a support worker to a personal assistant; re-interviewing senior care staff to underline the aim of creating major change - not just the same way of working under a different title. Key factors that help make the process successful include strong leadership, the involvement of individuals’ families, and clear communication and targets. The learning shared from Enham’s experience of introducing a personal assistant workforce will be useful for providers and commissioners in shaping a workforce that is equipped to deliver truly personalised care and support. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Developing an outcomes model for disabled children in Scotland

Author:
CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
3
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government’s Children’s Rights and Wellbeing Division to identify and develop an outcomes model based on Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC), and the SHANARRI indicators of wellbeing, for disabled children and young people in Scotland. It was to include both children with disabilities as defined by the Equality Act 2010 and those defined as having additional support needs in the context of the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004. The project was modified early on to focus on mapping outcomes work that is already in progress, and to identify the essential components of outcomes models. These research findings summarises the main report's findings. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Developing an outcomes model for disabled children in Scotland

Author:
CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
67
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Disabled children have broadly the same aspirations as non-disabled children and the outcomes they would like to achieve are therefore similar. However, for many disabled children and young people, there are fundamental outcomes that need to be achieved as a foundation for others, including and especially, communication. This project focused on better understanding ‘outcome models’ for all children and young people and for children and young people in the diverse and challenging context of disability. This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government’s Children’s Rights and Wellbeing Division to identify and develop an outcomes model based on Getting It Right for Every Child (GIRFEC), and the SHANARRI indicators of wellbeing (“Safe, Healthy, Achieving, Nurtured, Active, Respected, Responsible, Included”) for disabled children and young people in Scotland. It was to include both children with disabilities as defined by the Equality Act 2010 and those defined as having additional support needs in the context of the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004. The project was modified early on to focus on mapping outcomes work that is already in progress, and to identify the essential components of outcomes models. (Edited publisher abstract)

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