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Journal article

Unwanted sex among young adults in the United States: the role of physical disability and cognitive performance

Authors:
HAYDON Abigail A., MCREE Annie-Laurie, HALPERN Carolyn Tucker
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 26(17), November 2011, pp.3476-3493.
Publisher:
Sage

Individuals with physical and cognitive disabilities are at least as likely to experience interpersonal violence and abuse as individuals without disabilities. This study examined associations between unwanted sexual experiences (physically forced and nonphysically coerced sex) and physical disability and cognitive performance. It used data about 11,878 participants from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative survey of the young people in the United States. Survey questions about unwanted sexual experiences were designed to reflect only experiences occurring outside of parent or caregiver relationships and to exclude instances of childhood or adolescent sexual abuse. Approximately 24% of females and 4% of males reported unwanted sexual experiences. Compared to respondents without disabilities, females with a physical disability had greater odds of experiencing forced sex whereas males with a physical disability had greater odds of coerced sex. Men and women with poor cognitive performance were at least as likely to experience unwanted sexual contact as those with average cognitive ability. The authors discuss the findings and suggest that further research is required about the association between disability and unwanted sexual experiences.

Journal article

Exploratory study on challenges faced by ageing persons with physical disabilities

Author:
CHUNG Angela
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, 21(1), June 2011, pp.89-96.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

As the population enjoys a longer life expectancy, persons with disabilities are also living longer. There is growing evidence that persons with physical disabilities may age in an accelerated way from their able-bodied counterparts, due to over-use of particular muscle groups to compensate for a lost function or to long-term complications resulting from the original impairments. This exploratory study sought to investigate whether older adults with lifelong physical disabilities are buffered with sufficient financial, familial, social, and spiritual resources to deal with this challenge. A total of 28 beneficiaries aged 50 years and above from a voluntary welfare organisation that supports persons with disabilities took part in an interviewer-administered survey. In addition, 6 respondents also took part in individual face-to-face interviews. The findings showed some level of perceived lack of financial and social resources, and a general sentiment of apprehension over financial needs and future care. The article concludes that more preparation should be done to educate and prepare ageing persons with disabilities to better plan for their old age.

Journal article

Losing out on both counts: disabled women and domestic violence

Authors:
THIARA Ravi K., HAGUE Gill, MULLENDER Audrey
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 26(6), 2011, pp.757-771.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This national study was the first in the UK to explore the experiences of disabled women with physical and sensory impairment affected by domestic violence. The aim was to further understanding of the needs of abused disabled women, to investigate the scope of existing provision, and identify gaps within both domestic violence and disability services. The study, conducted from 2005 to 2008, utilised a multi-method strategy, including: an initial focus group with disabled women to inform the research; interviews with key professionals and activists in women’s and disability organisations; consultation with disabled abused women; a national survey of domestic violence organisations; a national survey of disabled people’s organisations; and in-depth interviews with 30 abused disabled women. Utilising the concept of intersectionality to locate abused disabled women along axes of oppression/domination, the paper highlights the complex nature of women’s abuse experiences as well as the inadequacy of professional responses. It argues that a lack of resources and training is widespread among both disability and domestic violence services, which largely continue to work in ‘siloed’ ways. This exacerbates the situation for disabled women who are likely to experience greater and prolonged abuse, thus losing out on both counts.

Book Full text available online for free

Children and young persons, England: the breaks for carers of disabled children regulations 2011: statutory instrument 2011 no. 707

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Acts, Bills
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

These regulations cover the duty of local authorities to make provisions for short break care for carers of disabled children and the types of services which must be provided.

Journal article

Systems of care: transition from the bio-psycho-social perspective of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

Author:
CAMARGO O. Kraus de
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 37(6), November 2011, pp.792-799.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The transition process of adolescents with complex health conditions occurs in all areas of their life. Systems of care are usually designed within certain aspects of life, as addressed by health, education and social welfare. Recent policies are trying to integrate these systems allowing for a more integrated transition process. This article illustrates how these developments are represented within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and provides arguments that favour a greater integration of systems of care. Examples of systems of care from North America, Germany and the UK are described. In order to assist young people in transition, there is a consensus that the approach should be individualised. The overall goal of any intervention or service should be to achieve optimal functioning of the patients. In the framework of the ICF, this means that biomedical and contextual issues need to be taken into consideration. This requires an exchange of information between the different systems or the integration of those systems involved with the patient. The author concludes that close collaboration between agencies are useful in smoothing the transition process.

Journal article

The CLAP Group: a group for children with cleft lip and palate

Author:
O'DRISCOLL Pádraig
Journal article citation:
Groupwork, 21(2), 2011, pp.22-34.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

This article describes the rationale and implementation of a closed group of pre-adolescent children with a cleft lip and palate facial disfigurement (CLAP). The aim of the group was to expose the children to other children with similar facial disfigurement and to create a forum of understanding and self-help. A solution-focused child-centred approach aimed to educate the children to handle issues of self-esteem and bullying. The article underlines the importance of meticulous preparation, going through various steps of planning for the group including need, purpose, composition, structure and context. Weekly sessions were led by 2 facilitators and incorporated games, art, role playing and drama. The article examines the implications for leadership and group facilitation in the context of values for empowering practice for children and facilitators. The potential limitations of the group are also discussed in detail.

Journal article

What influences participation in leisure activities of children and youth with physical disabilities? A systematic review

Authors:
BULT M. K., et al
Journal article citation:
Research in Developmental Disabilities, 32(5), September 2011, pp.1521-1529.

A range of variables associated with participation in leisure activities was identified and reported in the 17 studies included in this systematic review. The bulk of the evidence comes from studies of young people with cerebral palsy, although similar variables seem to apply to children with other physical disabilities. Age was found to be an important factor that influences participation, but there is no evidence on the variables associated with different age groups. The need for more studies in more diverse populations, and a clearer definition and standardised measure of participation is emphasised.

Book

My passport

Author:
KIDZ AWARE
Publisher:
Kidz Aware
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
Wakefield

The passport is designed as a workbook for disabled children, so they can tell people more about themselves. Areas coved include: likes and dislikes; eating and drinking; communication and speech; health issues and emergency contact numbers.

Journal article

Avoiding institutional outcomes for older adults living with disability: the use of community-based aged care supports

Authors:
ELLISON Caroline, WHITE Amy, CHAPMAN Libby
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(3), September 2011, pp.175-183.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Most people, regardless of ability or impairment, want to remain independent and living in their own home as they age. This study aimed to establish if accessing community-based aged care supports was perceived as assisting individuals ageing with a disability to remain living in their own homes and to avoid more institutional models of service. Sixty individuals aged 50 years and over with an intellectual, physical or neurological disability were interviewed to determine their perceptions in relation to ageing and the supports needed to remain living in the community. In addition, 26 staff and 6 family members were interviewed. The findings indicated that the participants receiving community-based aged care supports reported benefits including opportunities to develop relationships, maintain daily living skills, and participate in community activities. However, due to a lack of confidence in the availability of access to mainstream community-based aged care services, many participants felt vulnerable or unsure about their future and ability to remain living in their own home. Several participants commented that this meant that an undesired early relocation into residential aged care or congregate disability services appeared inevitable.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Role of voluntary groups in disability service provision

Author:
BAXTER Kate
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 27.10.11, 2011, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A research study by the Institute of Public Care, 'Gain without Pain', is reviewed. The study shows how the voluntary sector can offer innovative ways of meeting three challenges facing social care: increasing demand; decreasing funds; and changing expectations. It uses ten case studies, each one showing a different way of offering innovative delivery of services, to promote the benefits of commissioning the voluntary sector to provide services. Practice implications for commissioners, support planners and brokers, and voluntary organisations are provided.

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