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Book

Students with disabilities, learning difficulties and disadvantages: policies, statistics and indicators: 2007

Author:
ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT
Publisher:
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
234p., tables
Place of publication:
Paris

This book provides an internationally comparable set of indicators on educational provision for students with disabilities, learning difficulties and disadvantages (DDD). It highlights the number of students involved, where they are educated – special schools, special classes or regular classes – and in what phases of education – pre-primary, primary, lower secondary and upper secondary education.  It also includes information on the physical provision and on student/teacher ratios and discusses policy implications concerning special education. This new edition also presents for the first time trends in the data for students with DDD from 1999 to 2003. This edition presents new quantitative and qualitative data for the school year 2002-03 in the following OECD countries : Belgium (Flemish and French Communities.), the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom (England) and the United States and in the non-member economy Chile.

Journal article

'They're taking the place of my hands': perspectives of people using personal care

Authors:
MEYER Michelle, DONELLY Michelle, WEERAKOON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 22(6), October 2007, pp.595-608.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This study investigated the experience of personal support provided by paid service providers. People who were using formal personal care services (participants) were engaged in in-depth interviews about their experiences. The results of a thematic analysis of transcript data are reported. Findings indicate that the participants wanted their personal autonomy facilitated when they received assistance. This was achieved when the carer replaced the participant's 'hands' and followed the choices and preferences of the participant when providing assistance. A number of barriers prevented participants from achieving self-determination. This included the carer's attitudes and aversions to tasks, formal training and rules and regulations set down by the personal care service providers.

Journal article

Performance on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children by Australian 3- to 5-year-old children

Authors:
LIVESEY D., COLEMAN R., PIEK J.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(6), November 2007, pp.713-719.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The Movement Assessment Battery for Children (Movement ABC) was developed as a means of identifying those at risk of motor impairment. This test has been widely adopted as a means of assessing Australian children, but no attempt has been made to test the validity of its normative data for Australian samples. This study examines the 4- and 5-year-old Australian data in comparison with the Movement ABC age norms. Additionally, a 3-year-old sample was tested to determine if the test is suitable for discriminating motor performance in this age group. Representative samples of 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children from two Australian cities (Sydney and Perth) were tested on the Movement ABC band-one tests and the results compared with 4- and 5-year norms. There was significant age-related change in performance across the Australian samples with significant gender effects on some tasks. The Australian 4-year-old children performed better than the American sample on most tests, but this difference had disappeared by 5 years. The results indicate that the Movement ABC is a useful tool in discriminating among pre-school Australian children as young as 3 years of age. The differences between Australian and American children indicate that further studies comparing other age groups are warranted, but the differences did not appear to be sufficiently large to have clinical significance.

Journal article

Stability and change in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

Authors:
SUDGEN D. A., CHAMBERS M. E.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(5), September 2007, pp.520-528.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are a heterogeneous group who have a marked impairment in the performance of functional motor skills. Provision for these children is usually made via a paediatrician through occupational or physiotherapy; though with a prevalence rate of 5%, regular provision is rarely possible because of limited professional resources. This study covers a period of nearly 4 years and initially examined a group of 31 children first identified as having DCD at 7–9 years of age. The children were observed and assessed before, during and after a total of 16 weeks of intervention carried out by parents and teachers. This was followed by a period of monitoring of performance for 26 of the children in the motor domain plus other abilities such as educational progress and self-concept. Individual children were tracked using a variety of qualitative and quantitative approaches, building up longitudinal whole child profiles. Following intervention, 14 of the 26 children have shown improvement and stability in all areas and no longer display DCD symptoms. Eight children have profiles which have shown variability, with the children moving in and out of the DCD classification, while the remaining four children have consistently scored poorly in their movement skills and in addition received ongoing support in school for academic subjects. The study has confirmed that children with DCD show varying profiles over a period of time and that the profiles have distinct characteristics related to events in the child’s life. This approach to examining stability and change in the progressions of children’s difficulties is in keeping with an ecological approach to explaining development with its multilayered influences creating changes.

Journal article

Developmental Coordination Disorder and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome – overlapping disorders? Implications for research and clinical practice

Authors:
MCCLURE I., LE COUTEUR A.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(5), September 2007, pp.513-519.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) are two childhood disorders usually identified separately. DCD is a heterogeneous condition with little known of the underlying aetiology of the disorder. This paper examines the potential overlap between DCD and JHS and examines children with DCD for symptoms which may be consistent with a diagnosis of JHS. Implications for research and clinical practice are considered. A questionnaire covering a range of symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of JHS and related autonomic nervous systemic symptoms was completed by parents from 27 children with DCD and compared with responses from parents of 27 typically developing children. Children with DCD showed a significant difference from the group of typically developing children on questions regarding hypermobility, pain and autonomic nervous system symptoms, typifying JHS. This study has shown a similarity in symptoms seen in some DCD children to those with a diagnosis of JHS. In addition, children are also presenting with multi-system symptomatology including those involving the autonomic nervous system. This study reinforces other recent work showing the reverse pattern of JHS children showing similar functional similarities to DCD children. This has implications for future research in DCD in order to understand the underlying aetiology of this complex disorder. In addition, it is important for clinicians to be aware of these findings in order to provide appropriate and tailored support and treatment for children presenting with differing patterns of co-ordination difficulties. Children with DCD and JHS may require appropriate podiatry as well as recognition of their symptoms of pain and how this may affect participation in physical activity.

Journal article

Mental health and social support: a pioneering study on the physically disabled in southern China

Authors:
WU Qiaobing, MOK Bongho
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 16(2), January 2007, pp.41-54.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This is a pioneering study examining the effect of different types of social support on the mental health of the physically disabled in mainland China. With a random sample of 204 physically disabled people in Guangzhou, the biggest metropolis in southern China, results of this study showed that perceived social support was more effective in maintaining the mental health of the physically disabled than received social support. With respect to received social support, the attitude of the supporters, satisfaction with the support, the reciprocity of support relationships and the personal agency of the support recipients were found to be predictive of mental health. However, received daily-care support unexpectedly showed a significantly negative effect on mental health, while received economic and emotional support appeared to be irrelevant to the mental health of the physically disabled.

Journal article

Men on the margin: a Bourdieusian examination of living into adulthood with muscular dystrophy

Authors:
GIBSON Barbara E., et al
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(3), August 2007, pp.505-517.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are part of a growing population of community-dwelling persons dependent on life support technologies. This Canadian study drew from Bourdieu's critical social theory to explore the identities and social positionings of 10 men with DMD in relation to dominant discourses of disability, masculinity and technology. Semi-structured interviews with participants and participant-generated video diaries revealed that these men were materially, socially and symbolically marginalized through inaccessible built environments, social arrangements that limited their engagement in community life, and the multiple ways that their bodies were negatively marked across social space. Furthermore their marginalization had been embodied through processes of socialization and internalization of subordinate social positionings. While the men created positive personal spaces for recognition and success, their achievements were severely circumscribed by significant social inequities.

Book Full text available online for free

Inspection of services for people with physical or sensory impairments: Trafford Council: April 2007

Authors:
TALBOT Sue, et al
Publisher:
Commission for Social Care Inspection. North West
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
Manchester
Journal article Full text available online for free

Chinese disability accommodation policy

Author:
FISHER Karen
Journal article citation:
Social Policy Research Centre Newsletter, 96, May 2007, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre

This article describes research undertaken in 2006 in China on Chinese disability policy. It summarises the research process, findings and implications for the participation of the Social Policy Research Centre in Chinese disability policy research.

Journal article

African and Caribbean Disablement Association (ACDA)

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
New Bulletin, March 2007, p.24.
Publisher:
Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation

This article profiles the work of the African and Caribbean Disablement Association, a small charity based in the London Borough of Waltham Forest and managed by African and Caribbean disabled people. The charity offers a unique support service and arranges events.

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