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Book Full text available online for free

Improved public transport for disabled people: volume II - annexes 1-3

Author:
TNS SYSTEM THREE SOCIAL RESEARCH
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive. Social Research
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
104p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Executive commissioned research to support their commitment to assessing public transport options for disabled people and to improve targeting of funding. The large scale study was carried out by three organisations in collaboration: TNS System Three Social Research, the Transport Research Institute at Napier University and Transport and Travel Research Ltd. The results were presented in a comprehensive report contained in Volume 1 of the study. Two volumes of Annexes accompany the report. This volume, Volume II, includes Annexes 1-3: the literature review, analysis of the SHS data and further information about the TNS survey. The literature review was conducted early in the research. Some reports were provided to the researchers after it was completed. In some cases these have been included in the final report, though they do not appear in the literature review. Details of TNS survey includes the survey methodology, the questionnaire and selected additional results from the survey. Volume III contains Annexes 4-6. It includes details of all of the best practice case studies and journey audits that were conducted. It also includes details of the feedback exercise, which was designed to gather feedback in response to a document outlining some preliminary findings of the research.

Book Full text available online for free

Improved public transport for disabled people: volume III - annexes 4-6

Author:
TNS SYSTEM THREE SOCIAL RESEARCH
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive. Social Research
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
124p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Executive commissioned research to support their commitment to assessing public transport options for disabled people and to improve targeting of funding. The large scale study was carried out by three organisations in collaboration: TNS System Three Social Research, the Transport Research Institute at Napier University and Transport and Travel Research Ltd. The results were presented in a comprehensive report contained in Volume 1 of the study. Two volumes of Annexes accompany the report. The first of these, Volume II, includes Annexes 1-3: the literature review, analysis of the SHS data and details of the TNS survey. This report, volume III, contains Annexes 4-6. It includes details of all of the best practice case studies and journey audits that were conducted. Some of the case studies and all of the journey audits are illustrated with photographs and other graphics. It also includes details of the feedback exercise, which was designed to gather feedback in response to a document outlining some preliminary findings of the research. The document sent out and the feedback received are included in Annex 6. In addition we received informal feedback throughout the research, and this has been included in the main report.

Book Full text available online for free

Improved public transport for disabled people: main findings

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive Social Research. Development Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive. Social Research
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The study ‘Improved Public Transport for Disabled People’ was commissioned by the Scottish Executive, and conducted by TNS System Three Social Research (TNS), the Transport Research Institute at Napier University (TRi) and Transport and Travel Research Ltd. (TTR) in 2005/6. This summaries the main findings of the report.

Book Full text available online for free

Improved public transport for disabled people: volume I - report

Author:
TNS SYSTEM THREE SOCIAL RESEARCH
Publisher:
Scottish Executive. Social Research
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Executive commissioned research to support their commitment to assessing public transport options for disabled people and to improve targeting of funding. Originally the focus of the required work was on the role of concessionary fares in relation to accessibility of transport for disabled travellers to inform the commitment laid out in the 2003 Scottish Executive Partnership Agreement. Advice from the Advisory Group led to the scope being broadened out at a very early stage. As a result, the focus of the research was changed to explore and assess a wide range of potential improvements to public transport for disabled people in relation to; difficulties in relation to the availability of transport; difficulties in relation to the accessibility of transport; information needs; affordability; fear of travel - confidence; personal barriers to travel. Evidenced from the literature review carried out for this study demonstrates that improved access to public transport is a crucial element of trying to increase opportunities, reduce inequalities and generally improve the life quality of many groups in society. Previous research has also indicated that there have been some improvements introduced in recent years. The introduction of recent Disability Discrimination legislation is a key step forward, but it is clear that many barriers still remain and that improvements are required in order to facilitate the use of practical, affordable and accessible transport for many people with illness and disability. Additionally, key demographic trends suggest that it is likely that difficulties with transport will extend to affect a larger proportion of the population. Therefore, research was required to identify what actions are still required to further improve the situation and to explore why previously identified ‘solutions’ had not necessarily been adopted or successful.

Book Full text available online for free

Housing homeless disabled people

Author:
DOHERTY Karen Anne
Publisher:
Shelter
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This report written by a housing advisor from the Glasgow Centre for Inclusive Living examines how far disabled homeless peoples needs are met by service providers. It found that disabled peoples applications for assistance are now more likely to be accepted than before at a local level, however this does not necessarily mean that disabled peoples needs are being met.

Book

Perspectives on disability and rehabilitation: contesting assumptions; challenging practice

Author:
HAMMELL Karen Whalley
Publisher:
Churchill Livingstone
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
258p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This book seeks to guide professionals and academics from disciplines that rely upon the presence of disability in society such as nursing, occupational health and physiotherapy, through the recent explosion of publications from theorists in the humanities and social sciences, and from cultural, feminist, race, queer and disability theorists, which have contested the way in which disability is understood and managed. The author asks rehabilitation practitioners to question whether their professional assumptions are either benevolent or right and aims to stimulate a more critical approach to both the “problem” of physical difference and disability and the nature of rehabilitation following illness or injury. Relating eclectic theoretical viewpoints to practical examples throughout, this book questions the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) definition of disability, highlights the consequences of being classified as deviant from valued norms and the role that traditional rehabilitation methods may play in the perpetuation of injustice. With chapters on issues central to rehabilitation, such as the nature of the body and its physical impairment and the ideas of independence, privilege and power within more client-centred philosophies, the author seeks to update and improve the education, practice, service delivery, research and theoretical development of the rehabilitation professions.

Journal article

Independent lives and the relevance of lifetime homes

Author:
IMRIE Rob
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 21(4), June 2006, pp.359-374.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

A problem for disabled people, particularly individuals dependent on the use of a wheelchair, is housing that is not easily usable due to physical barriers. A proposed solution by government is the adoption of lifetime homes (LTH) standards that are likely to become mandatory for all newly constructed dwellings in the private sector in England by 2008. It is, therefore, an appropriate time to take stock of LTH standards, and to evaluate to what extent they are able to address the problems for disabled people caused by physically inaccessible housing. In doing so, the article provides a critique of LTH standards, and suggests that while they are, in some respects, a positive development, they are not, in and of themselves, a panacea in relation to rectifying the shortfall of accessible dwellings.

Book

Anger management: an anger management training package for individuals with disabilities

Authors:
GULBENKOGLU Hrepsime, NAGILIASSIS Nick
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
167p.
Place of publication:
London

Many people with intellectual disabilities have difficulty managing feelings of anger. Anger Management is a complete training package for helping people with intellectual or physical disabilities deal with anger in constructive, effective ways. The training program consists of 12 fully-scripted sessions dealing with topics such as recognising feelings of anger, learning to relax and think calmly, and being assertive and handling problems competently. Each session follows a standard format, including introductions, reviews of previous sessions, and explanations. Photocopiable handouts, facilitator's script and evaluation sheets are provided for each session. Designed specifically for people with intellectual disabilities, but suitable for people with physical disabilities too, this training package provides relevant and authoritative information and exercises.

Journal article

Motor, visual and egocentric transformations in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

Authors:
WILLIAMS J., et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(6), November 2006, pp.633-647.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aimed to test the internal modelling deficit (IMD) hypothesis using the mental rotation paradigm. According to the IMD hypothesis, children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have an impaired ability to internally represent action. Thirty-six children (18 DCD) completed four tasks: two versions of a single-hand rotation task (with and without explicit imagery instructions), a whole-body imagery task and an alphanumeric rotation task. There was partial support for the hypothesis that children with DCD would display an atypical pattern of performance on the hand rotation task, requiring implicit use of motor imagery. Overall, there were no significant differences between the DCD and control groups when the hand task was completed without explicit instructions, on either response time or accuracy. However, when imagery instructions were introduced, the controls were significantly more accurate than the DCD group, indicating that children with DCD were unable to benefit from explicit cuing. As predicted, the controls were also significantly more accurate than the DCD group on the whole-body task, with the accuracy of the DCD group barely rising above chance. Finally, and as expected, there was no difference between the groups on the alphanumeric task, a measure of visual (or object-related) imagery. The inability of the DCD group to utilize specific motor imagery instructions and to perform egocentric transformations lends some support to the IMD hypothesis. Future work needs to address the question of whether the IMD itself is subgroup-specific.

Book Full text available online for free

The Social Security (Incapacity Benefit Work-focused Interviews) (Amendment No. 2) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006: statutory rule 2006 no. 398

Author:
NORTHERN IRELAND
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
Belfast

The Department for Social Development makes the Regulations in exercise of the powers conferred by sections 2A(1) and 165(4) to (6) and (7A) of the Social Security Administration (Northern Ireland) Act 1992 and now vested in it.

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