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Breaking down the barriers: social housing for people with disabilities in Europe

Author:
RANDALL Bill
Publisher:
CECODHAS. The European Liaison Committee for Social Housing
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
33p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

Breaking down the barriers Social Housing for People with disabilities marks the European Year of People with Disabilities. The report catalogues the many and innovative ways in which housing associations, companies and co-ops are breaking down the barriers to liberate disabled people across the European Union. The report is published in English, German and French.

Book

Promoting independence: candidate handbook: S/NVQ level 3

Author:
NOLAN Yvonne
Publisher:
Heinemann
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
360p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Candidates can now take a specialist route through their NVQ in order to work with the elderly or those with special needs. This title is specially written for these candidates. The title covers 5 mandatory units of the award and 10 of the option units, providing students with a choice in their selection of option units. Case studies encourage candidates to apply their learning in the context of the type of work they will be doing, whilst "Check It Out" sections aim to help candidates build on their own experiences and give them confidence in their work. "Test Yourself" sections ensure candidates understand all the theory they have learnt. "Active Knowledge" tasks help candidates to apply the theory in their own place of work.

Journal article

Young Care-Givers- Children of disabled persons

Author:
URDANC Kristina
Journal article citation:
Ljetopis Studijskog Centra Socijalnog Rada, 10(2), 2003, pp.187-195.
Publisher:
University of Zagreb
Place of publication:
Zagreb

The author looks at the situation of under-aged children of disabled family members who, due to insufficient social support and care, have been made the main and sometimes only source of assistance to their parents or family members. Although results of systematic research about the kind of influence such demands and family obligations have had on the quality of life and experience of these children do not exist, practice has confirmed that the community’s deficiencies in caring for its disabled members often bring about the cummulation of various risk and stress factors in the growing and maturing process of disabled persons’ children. The author also highlights the importance of conducting research of this group in order to organise more effective and better established support. [Article in Croatian].

Book

Finding a voice

Authors:
BURKE Peter, MONTGOMERY Sue
Publisher:
Venture Press
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
39p.
Place of publication:
Birmingham

This book recognises the importance of supporting the siblings of disabled children. The research report provides a further source of evidence underpinning work in supporting services to disabled children and their families.

Book

Access in London: essential for anyone who has difficulty getting around

Authors:
COUCH Gordon, FORRESTER William, MCGAUGHEY David
Publisher:
Bloomsbury
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
438p.
Place of publication:
London

Aimed at disabled people and anyone who has difficulty getting around. Includes tips on travelling and who to contact for assistance; detailed sections on accommodation, shopping, theatres, pubs, football grounds, museums, buses, trains and the Underground; describes seating and toilet facilities, steps and distances; and contains detailed maps and diagrams highlighting step free routes.

Journal article

Rural disabled elders

Authors:
DePOY Elizabeth, GILSON Stephen French
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 41(1/2), 2003, pp.175-190.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Discusses the tension between nomothetic and idiographic thinking about populations, and advances a definition which embodies both. Argues that rural disabled elders are therefore a diverse set of members who both share some commonalities and are rich in their diversity and difference. To belong to this group, members must live outside of urban areas, be advanced in age and experience, and exhibit at least one atypical characteristic that carries an explanation which fits legitimate disability determination by a formal source. Advances an approach to social work practice guided by the synthesis of two ideologies, self determination and legitimacy, and informed by systematic examination and analysis of social problems that affect individuals and groups. Concludes by advancing positive and negative principles for practice.

Journal article

An exploratory study on attitudes towards persons with disabilities among U.S. and Japanese social work students

Authors:
HAYASHI Reiko, KIMURA Mariko
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 2(2/3), 2003, pp.65-85.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This exploratory study was conducted to understand and compare attitudes among social work students in the United States and Japan toward people with disabilities. The Modified Issues in Disabilities Scale (MIDS), designed to measure attitudes toward people with physical disabilities, was implemented on convenient samples of 92 U.S. and 73 Japanese social work students. The findings suggest that social work students in both countries hold moderately positive attitudes. Other similarities as well as differences among the sampled students from the two countries, and their implications to social work education, are discussed.

Journal article

Consumer access to agency websites: our best foot forward?

Authors:
VERNON Robert, LYNCH Darlene
Journal article citation:
Journal of Technology in Human Services, 21(4), 2003, pp.37-51.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Reports on an exploratory study where one hundred social service agency websites in the USA were examined to find out how easily consumers could access posted information on them. Each website was analysed for multiple language availability, reading, simplicity, reading comprehension and disability access.This study found substantial barriers to website access for social service consumers. Discusses design issues to make website access easier such as disability standards, policy suggestions and best practices. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Access is coming home

Author:
HODGKINSON Conrad
Journal article citation:
Access by Design, 97, Winter 2003, pp.21-24.
Publisher:
Centre for Accessible Environments

Looks at the Accessible Property Register, a new resource available on the Internet for disabled people looking to buy, rent or sell accessible or adapted housing.

Journal article

Visual impairment in childhood: insights from a community-based survey

Authors:
FLANAGAN N.M., JACKSON A.J., HILL A.E.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(6), November 2003, pp.493-499.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aimed to produce a profile of visual impairment (VI) in childhood with a view to informing future services and raise awareness of the need for comprehensive assessment including developmental remediation and educational advice, against the background that the concept of VI in childhood has changed over the last 30 years. The number of children with an isolated visual problem has decreased and the numbers with VI and coexisting neurological disability has increased. Seventy-six children with VI were identified from multiple sources including hospital and community paediatricians and statutory blind registers giving a childhood prevalence of 1.61 per 1,000. Thirty-two per cent had a normal pattern of development. Global delays/severe learning difficulty were found in 43%. Only 21% had an isolated VI. Additional medical problems were present in 79% of which cerebral palsy, occurring in 33%, was the most common. Nine per cent were classified as totally blind. Cortical visual impairment was diagnosed in 45%. Twenty-two per cent were registered blind or partially sighted. Most cases of VI in children did not appear on the statutory blind or partially sighted registers, thus these have limited value for service development. The practice implications highlight the need for early assessment and advice from a co-ordinated team to optimise visual potential in childhood.

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