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Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 1 introduction

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Many disabled parents are reluctant or even anxious about asking for help from social services. They don’t want it to look as though they are not coping or are not good enough parents. Many people think social services only get involved when something has gone wrong and their children are seen as being in need or at risk in some way. In many places social services are working out how to support disabled parents by providing the right kind of specialist adult support to parents in good time to prevent problems arising.

Book Full text available online for free

Personal assistance for adults (19-64) with physical impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
36p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assesses the effectiveness of personal assistance for adults with physical impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Adults with physical impairments living in the community who require assistance to perform tasks of daily living and participate in normal activities due to permanent impairments were included. Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. One randomised controlled trial involving 817 participants compared personal assistance versus usual care met the selection criteria. Findings showed that whilst personal assistance was generally preferred over other services, some people prefer other models of care. Whilst paid assistance probably substitutes for informal care and may cost government more than alternatives, the total costs to recipients and society are currently unknown. Further studies are required to determine which models of personal assistance are most effective and efficient for particular people.

Book Full text available online for free

Personal assistance for children and adolescents (0-18) with both physical and intellectual impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
30p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of personal assistance for children and adolescents with both physical and intellectual impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Personal assistance is defined as paid support of at least 20 hours per week for people with impairments to enable them to participate in mainstream activities. The report focuses and the methodology used in the review;  Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. The review identified no studies that met the inclusion criteria.

Book

Perspectives on disability and rehabilitation: contesting assumptions; challenging practice

Author:
HAMMELL Karen Whalley
Publisher:
Churchill Livingstone
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
258p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This book seeks to guide professionals and academics from disciplines that rely upon the presence of disability in society such as nursing, occupational health and physiotherapy, through the recent explosion of publications from theorists in the humanities and social sciences, and from cultural, feminist, race, queer and disability theorists, which have contested the way in which disability is understood and managed. The author asks rehabilitation practitioners to question whether their professional assumptions are either benevolent or right and aims to stimulate a more critical approach to both the “problem” of physical difference and disability and the nature of rehabilitation following illness or injury. Relating eclectic theoretical viewpoints to practical examples throughout, this book questions the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) definition of disability, highlights the consequences of being classified as deviant from valued norms and the role that traditional rehabilitation methods may play in the perpetuation of injustice. With chapters on issues central to rehabilitation, such as the nature of the body and its physical impairment and the ideas of independence, privilege and power within more client-centred philosophies, the author seeks to update and improve the education, practice, service delivery, research and theoretical development of the rehabilitation professions.

Book

Support network on disability: a resource guide to disability groups and organisations

Author:
ARAMAYO Manuel
Publisher:
Manchester Metropolitan University. Interpersonal and Organisational Development Research Group
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
98p.
Place of publication:
Manchester

Directory and resource guide to disability groups and organisations arranged alphabetically by disability.

Journal article

Independent lives and the relevance of lifetime homes

Author:
IMRIE Rob
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 21(4), June 2006, pp.359-374.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

A problem for disabled people, particularly individuals dependent on the use of a wheelchair, is housing that is not easily usable due to physical barriers. A proposed solution by government is the adoption of lifetime homes (LTH) standards that are likely to become mandatory for all newly constructed dwellings in the private sector in England by 2008. It is, therefore, an appropriate time to take stock of LTH standards, and to evaluate to what extent they are able to address the problems for disabled people caused by physically inaccessible housing. In doing so, the article provides a critique of LTH standards, and suggests that while they are, in some respects, a positive development, they are not, in and of themselves, a panacea in relation to rectifying the shortfall of accessible dwellings.

Book Full text available online for free

Your human rights: a guide for disabled people

Authors:
COOKE Sarah, MATTHEWS Lucy
Publisher:
British Institute of Human Rights
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
50p.
Place of publication:
London

Your Human Rights’ is a series of four plain English, non-technical guides focusing on the practical relevance of human rights in the UK. They are written directly for people living with mental health problems, disabled people, older people and refugees and asylum seekers who are in situations where they may need information on their human rights. They will also be useful for people working with these groups, or people who would like to know more about the impact of human rights on these groups. The present booklet  is devoted to

Journal article

Stranded in the middle: transition services lacking for young disabled people

Author:
SALE Anabel Unity
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 3.08.06, 2006, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Disabled young people and their families have long criticised services that are intended to ease their transition to adult care. However, there are signs that the issue is at last gaining political currency. There are 770,000 disabled children in the UK. More than 90 per cent of disabled children live at home and are supported by their families. One in 13 families get services from their local social services. 25 per cent of families with disabled children say services are poor or lack co-ordination.

Book

Promoting independence: candidate handbook: S/NVQ level 3

Author:
NOLAN Yvonne
Publisher:
Heinemann
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
360p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Candidates can now take a specialist route through their NVQ in order to work with the elderly or those with special needs. This title is specially written for these candidates. The title covers 5 mandatory units of the award and 10 of the option units, providing students with a choice in their selection of option units. Case studies encourage candidates to apply their learning in the context of the type of work they will be doing, whilst "Check It Out" sections aim to help candidates build on their own experiences and give them confidence in their work. "Test Yourself" sections ensure candidates understand all the theory they have learnt. "Active Knowledge" tasks help candidates to apply the theory in their own place of work.

Journal article

Wheeling out the evidence on disabled children

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Scope, July 2006, p.11.
Publisher:
Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action

Evidence from a new report published by Barnard's and Whizz-Kids had found a chronic lack of money, long delays and unsuitable equipment are having a disastrous impact on disabled children. This article looks at some examples.

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