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Book

Employment policies for disabled people: a review of legislation and services in fifteen countries

Authors:
LUNT Neil, THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Employment
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
222p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Sheffield

Contains detailed accounts of the current situation in all countries looked at, and in depth reports on France, Germany and the United States.

Journal article

Disability in Europe

Author:
GEORGE Mike
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.9.91, 1991, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at how Europe is addressing disability and the implications of 1992.

Journal article

When work and satisfaction with life do not go hand in hand: health barriers and personal resources in the participation of people with chronic physical disabilities

Authors:
van CAMPEN Cretien, CARDOL Mieke
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 69(1), July 2009, pp.56-60.
Publisher:
Elsevier

People with chronic physical disabilities participate less in both paid and voluntary work and are less satisfied with their lives than people without health problems. Governments and scientists have suggested that participation in employment is the main road to well-being. National survey data was on the participation in work and satisfaction with life was analysed, comparing people with a chronic illness and a physical disability (n = 603) to people with a chronic illness but without a physical disability (n = 1199) and the general population (n = 6128) in the Netherlands. The results show that the relationship between happiness and work is different for people with a chronic illness and a physical disability, as compared to the other two populations. Fewer people with a chronic illness and disability were categorized as ‘satisfied people with work’ (i.e. participating in work and satisfied with their life), while most people belonged to a group of ‘satisfied people without work’ and, surprisingly, not to the expected group of ‘dissatisfied people without work’. In order to explain this exceptional distribution the authors modelled satisfied participation in work as an outcome of a balance between personal resources and barriers. By means of discriminant regression analysis, the severity of motor disability was identified as the main barrier, and education level and age, as the main resource factors that distinguish between ‘satisfied people with work’ and others among the group of people with a chronic illness and a physical disability.

Book

Curing the Dutch disease: an international perspective on disability policy reform

Editors:
AARTS Leo J.M., BURKHAUSER Richard V., DE JONG Philip R.
Publisher:
Avebury
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
183p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Comparative study evaluating Dutch disability policies from the 1970s onwards. Experts from Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States go on to use the evaluation framework to compare policies in their own countries.

Journal article

Affective responses to social comparison: a study among disabled individuals

Authors:
YBEMA Jan F., BUUNK Bram P.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Psychology, 34(3), September 1995, pp.279-292.
Publisher:
British Psychological Society

Examines the effects of social comparison among 112 individuals receiving payments under the Disablement Insurance Act in the Netherlands.

Journal article

Beware the English situation

Author:
HATCHETT Will
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 7.5.92, 1992, pp.15-17.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Argues that the Dutch disability benefits system is moving in a 'Thatcherite' direction, and looks at the highly-developed advocacy movement for physically handicapped people.

Journal article

Rhythmic coordination of hand and foot in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

Authors:
VOLMAN M. J. M., LAROY M. E., JONGMANS M. J.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(6), November 2006, pp.693-702.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have difficulties producing stable rhythmic bimanual coordination patterns in comparison with age-related peers. Rhythmic coordination of non-homologous limbs (e.g. hand and foot) is even more difficult to perform because of mechanical differences between the limbs. The aim of the present study is to investigate the stability of hand–foot coordination patterns of children with DCD. Ten children with DCD (mean age 7.0 years, SD 1.1 years) and 16 control children (mean age 7.4 years, SD 1.3 years) participated in the study. They were asked to perform in-phase or anti-phase tapping movements in three different interlimb coordination combinations: (1) hand–hand (homologous), (2) hand–foot same body side (ipsilateral), and (3) hand–foot different body side (contralateral). Coordination stability was measured by the variability of the relative phase between the limbs under a 'steady state' (preferred) frequency condition, and by the critical frequency (i.e. the point at which loss of pattern stability was observed) in a condition in which the movement frequency was 'scaled' up (only anti-phase tapping). Coordination patterns of children in the DCD group were less stable in all three limb combinations compared with controls. Further, hand–foot coordination patterns were less stable than hand–hand coordination patterns. With regard to hand–foot coordination, ipsilateral patterns were equally stable compared with contralateral patterns in the in-phase task, but less stable in the anti-phase task. No differential effects were found between the DCD and control groups across the different limb combinations, except for steady-state anti-phase coordination in the ipsilateral limb condition. This effect was due to a relatively good performance of the control children in this condition in comparison with the other limb combination conditions. Children with DCD have difficulties producing stable rhythmic hand–foot coordination patterns compared with control children.

Journal article

The empowerment of marginals: strategic paradoxes

Authors:
van HOUTEN Douwe, JACOBS Gaby
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(6), October 2005, pp.641-654.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article is about the disability movement in the Netherlands and its strategies for empowerment of disabled people. Only since the end of 2003 has the Netherlands enjoyed antidiscrimination legislation for disabled people. But, how important actually is legislation for the empowerment of disabled people? To answer this question, the authors take a closer look at social movements and their involvement in empowerment and active citizenship. We criticise the disregard of differences and care in notions of active citizenship and propose instead the idea of a ‘varied society’ based on the notions of diverse and ‘careful citizenship’. One of the main arguments is that empowerment strategies necessary to create this kind of society are above all bottom-up strategies. However, the highly organised disability movement in the Netherlands is confronted with strategic paradoxes that have ‘depowering’ consequences. Based on these paradoxes, five recommendations for the disability movement in the Netherlands are presented.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Book

Health expectancy: first workshop of the International Healthy Life Expectancy Network (REVES)

Editors:
ROBINE Jean-Marie, BLANCHET Madeleine, DOWD John
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
188p.,tables.
Place of publication:
London

Looks at various studies devoted to disability-free life expectancy. Part 1 contains papers on: expectation of life without disability measured from OPCS disability surveys; summary of results of calculation of life expectancy free of disability in the Netherlands 1981-85; Health expectancy in Quebec 1987; recent values of disability-free life expectancy in the United States; health expectancy in Canada; data from Switzerland. Part 2 contains papers on the different types of disability-free life expectancy and the methods of calculation. Part 3 examines the interpretation of these calculations and part 4 at the uses of disability-free life expectancy.

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