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Journal article

Quality of life among disabled older adults without cognitive impairment and its relation to attendance in day care centres

Authors:
IECOVICH Esther, BIDERMAN Aya
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 33(4), 2013, pp.627-643.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Day care centres intend to improve the quality of life of disabled older adults. The aims of the paper are to: (a) examine the extent to which users of day care centres experience higher levels of quality of life compared to their peers who are non-users; and (b) to explore the relationships between the length of use and frequency of weekly attendance at day care centres and quality of life. This is a case-control study with a sample of 817 respondents, of whom 417 were users of day care centres and 400 were non-users, matched by age, gender and family physician. The study was conducted in 12 day care centres in the southern region of Israel. Data collection included face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Quality of life was found to be significantly related to the use of day care centres, but length and frequency of attendance were insignificant in explaining quality of life among users of day care centres. The study demonstrated that users of day care centres have a higher quality of life, but in a cross-sectional study we cannot prove causality. Therefore, more research using quasi-experimental and longitudinal research designs is necessary to assess causality between use and attendance at day care centres on users' quality of life. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Parents caring for adult children with physical disabilities: the impact of hope and closeness on caregiving benefits

Authors:
SCHWARTZ Chaya, HADAR Lilit
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 88(2), April 2007, pp.273-281.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

In the present study, the authors examined 82 parents of adult children with physical disabilities from Israel. The parents described the benefits of caregiving, and reported positive feelings about their involvement in caregiving as well as a sense of personal growth as a result of caregiving. When parents perceived caregiving as causing less emotional strain (subjective burden), and when they felt higher levels of closeness with their offspring, and expressed higher levels of hope, they were more likely to indicate that caregiving yielded benefits. In the discussion, the authors focus on the importance of developing closeness and hope among parents who care for their adult offspring with physical disabilities. The implications of this conclusion for social work intervention are also discussed.

Journal article

The development and standardization of the Children Activity Scales (ChAS-P/T) for the early identification of children with Developmental Coordination Disorders

Author:
ROSENBLUM S.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(6), November 2006, pp.619-632.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Previous studies have emphasized the importance of early identification of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) to prevent the development of secondary academic, emotional and social manifestations of the disorder. The aim of this study was to develop a valid parent and teacher questionnaire – the Children Activity Scales for parents (ChAS-P) and for teachers (ChAS-T) – to identify children aged 4–8 years at risk for DCD and to examine the reliability and validity of these questionnaires. The questionnaires' content and face validity were established, and then cut-off scores were determined based on responses of 355 teachers and 216 parents. Internal consistencies were also calculated. Factor analyses were performed, and construct validity was determined by examining the questionnaires' ability to discriminate between 30 children aged 5–6.5 years diagnosed with DCD and 30 typically developing children. Concurrent validity was examined by comparing questionnaire scores with those of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC). High values were obtained for internal consistency (0.96–0.94) for the ChAS-T and the ChAS-P respectively. Factor analysis revealed four distinct factors within the ChAS-P and three within the ChAS-T, reinforcing the theoretical validity of the items selected and appropriateness for identifying DCD. Construct validity was indicated by finding significant differences between the groups' scores on the ChAS-T and the ChAS-P. Significant correlations between the children's scores on the questionnaires and those of the M-ABC confirmed their concurrent validity. Initial results suggest that the ChAS-T and Chas-P are reliable tools to identify children at risk for DCD.

Journal article

Community care: experience overseas

Author:
CAMPBELL Stephen
Journal article citation:
County News, 88(3), June 1995, pp.24-25.

Provides an account of a visit to the Princess Basma Centre, a rehabilitation facility for disabled children in Jerusalem.

Journal article

Elder abuse and neglect-: a pilot incidence study in Israel

Authors:
IECOVICH Esther, LANKRI Michal, DRORI Daniela
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 16(3), 2005, pp.45-63.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The purposes of this study were: (1) to report on the incidence of elder abuse and neglect by forms of abuse among elderly persons in a metropolitan city in Israel; (2) to characterize the victims and their perpetrators; and (3) to report on the major pathologic family problems diagnosed in the victims' families and the professionals that were involved in intervention after an abused person had been identified. Data collection was conducted over a one-year period, during which 120 new cases of abuse and neglect were identified, an incidence rate of approximately 0.5% (elderly population include 24,800 inhabitants). Unmarried women, who were frail and disabled, and lived with others were at the greatest risk of abuse and neglect of all kinds. Differences were found with respect to age and ethnic origin. Mental abuse was the most prevalent form and in most cases abuse included a combination of various forms of abuse and neglect. Conflictual family relationships were found to be the most prevalent cause of any of the abusive behaviors and the least cause of abuse was caregiving to a dependent family member.

Journal article

Caring for people with disabilities in the Haredi community: adjustment mechanism in action

Authors:
LIFSHITZ Hefzibah, GLAUBMAN Rivka
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(5), August 2004, pp.469-484.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This study aims at examining the change in caring for individuals with developmental disability in the Haredi (Jewish ultra-Orthodox) community in Israel. Using qualitative methods, the authors examined the setting up and operating of educational, residential, and recreational facilities for this population. Of the 31 such facilities in two Israeli cities, 16 were randomly selected. The findings revealed three central issues expressing the process of a gradual change in the attitudes and in the forms of caring for persons with disabilities in this sector: (a) social crisis as a catalyst for change; (b) the Social model and rehabilitation principles; and (c) the role of the rabbis in the change process. These issues were explained based on the concept of 'adjustment mechanism'.

Journal article

Parents of children with chronic disabilities: the gratification of caregiving

Author:
SCHWARTZ Chaya
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 84(4), October 2003, pp.576-584.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

A sample of 167 parents of children with a mental illness or physical disability from Israel participated in this study. Parents reported receiving gratification from fulfilling their parental duties and from learning about themselves. The child's and parent's personal characteristics were significant predictors of gratification. Physical disability and younger age of the child were associated with higher level of gratification, as were the younger age of the parent, unemployment, and parental poor health. When parents perceived caregiving as causing less emotional strain (low subjective burden), they were more likely to express gratification. The amount of assistance that the parent gave the child (objective burden) did not have a unique contribution to parental gratification.

Journal article

Empowerment of parents of children with disabilities: the effect of community and personal variables

Authors:
ITZHAKY Haya, SCHWARTZ Chaya
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Social Work, 5(1), 2000, pp.21-36.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article explores empowerment among parents of children with disabilities. Specifically, it deals with how changes in parents' patterns of involvement and participation lead to empowerment. Parents of children with disabilities in Israel who are involved in voluntary organisations for the disabled were surveyed in relation to three components of empowerment: family; services; and community. Four community variables-patterns of activity in organisation, representation of the disabled and their families, participation in decision-making, and sense of belonging to the community-and two personal variables-self-esteem and mastery-were each found to affect at least one of the components of empowerment. The article includes some recommendations for social workers with regard to the empowerment of parents of disabled children.

Journal article

The subjective well-being of parents of children with developmental disabilities: the role of hope as predictor and fosterer of well-Being

Author:
GOLAN-SHENAAR Vered
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 15(2), 2016, pp.77-95.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The purpose of this study was to identify factors that can improve the subjective well-being (SWB) of parents of children with a developmental disability, expand the knowledge relating to the role of hope in their lives, and improve the extent to which parent appraisals of the influence of the disability (on the couple's relationship, family functioning, and personal development) moderate this association. Participants were a convenience sample of 114 Jewish Israeli parents of children with DD living in their parents’ home. The children ranged in age from 6 to 21. All the children were formally recognised by the State of Israel's Department of Welfare as being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disabilities (ID), or physical disabilities (PD). The results revealed that parental SWB was below the societal average; however, it differed significantly across levels of parent appraisals of their child's disability. Findings from this study point to the importance of hope to improve parental SWB. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Youth leadership program for changing self-image and attitude toward people with disabilities

Authors:
COHEN Ronen, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in Disability and Rehabilitation, 11(3), 2012, pp.197-218.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The attitude of society toward people with intellectual or psychiatric disabilities is predominantly negative in nature. Persons with disabilities usually arouse feelings of compassion, and are perceived as being incapable of working, in need of charity, inferior, and even asexual. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of an intervention programme on changes in attitude toward people with disabilities among member of a youth leadership group, and also to assess whether changes occurred in their self-image. The participants were 164 9th-grade students from various junior high schools throughout Israel. Half of the students participated in an integration programme for changing attitudes toward persons with disabilities, and the other half served as the control group. The group participated in workshops that presented information regarding disabilities and were also involved in volunteer projects offering services to people with disabilities. The research examined the existence and the degree of relationship between participation in the programme, changes in attitudes toward people with disabilities, and self-image. The research findings pointed to a positive change in attitudes of the participants of the programme in comparison with the control group, resulting mainly from personal contact with people with disabilities. No relationship was found between levels of self-image of the research group and attitudes toward people with disabilities.

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