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Book

Employment policies for disabled people: a review of legislation and services in fifteen countries

Authors:
LUNT Neil, THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Employment
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
222p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Sheffield

Contains detailed accounts of the current situation in all countries looked at, and in depth reports on France, Germany and the United States.

Journal article

Disability in Europe

Author:
GEORGE Mike
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.9.91, 1991, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at how Europe is addressing disability and the implications of 1992.

Journal article

Visual contribution to walking in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

Authors:
DECONINCK F. J. A., et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 32(6), November 2006, pp.711-722.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The motor co-ordination problems of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have been frequently associated with poor visuospatial processing. In order to extend these findings mainly based on fine motor experiments, the present study investigates the contribution of vision to the control of walking in children with DCD. Children with DCD (n = 12) walked at their preferred speed on a straight, firm and uncluttered walkway in a condition with normal lighting and in a dark condition. Spatiotemporal gait variables were assessed by means of a three-dimensional ProReflex camera system and compared with the gait pattern of matched, typically developing (TD) children (n = 12). In normal lighting, the gait pattern of both groups was similar, with the exception of subtle differences in the temporal phasing, showing a slightly longer support phase in the children with DCD. In the dark, step frequency and step length were decreased in the children with DCD, resulting in a significantly slower walking velocity. In addition, the medio-lateral excursion of the centre of mass tended to increase in this group. In the TD children, adaptations to the spatiotemporal pattern remained absent. These results suggest that children with DCD are more dependent on global visual flow information than TD children for the maintenance of balance and the control of velocity during walking. This increased dependency on visual control might be associated with a poorly developed internal sensorimotor model.

Journal article

Modern times: an ethnographic study on the quality of life of people with a high support need in a Flemish residential facility

Authors:
de WAELE Isabel, Van HOVE Geert
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(6), October 2005, pp.625-639.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This ethnographic study shows the impact of the care system on clients’ and staff’s life experiences, with the clear distance between these two groups as one of the core issues. Together with a dominant care approach and a well established but subtile system of control, it makes them function in systems that are characterized by an oppressing care culture. Learned helplessness prevents both groups of acting upon quality of life outcomes. The idea of supporting a life of good quality through merely improving these traditional care systems should therefore be considered with caution, and real alternatives should be considered to open this barrier of the oppressing care culture.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article

Continuation of caregiving among partners who give total care to spouses with multiple sclerosis

Authors:
BOEIJE Hennie R., DUIJNSTEE Mia S.H., GRYPDONCK Maria H.F.
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(3), May 2003, pp.242-252.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Addresses the total care phase in which spouses give direct and ongoing personal care to their partners with multiple sclerosis (MS). The dyadic nature of caregiving is stressed by examining the roles which both spouses play in establishing a commitment that results in the continuation of caregiving. For this purpose, 17 couples facing MS were selected in the Netherlands and Belgium. Ten females and 7 males were disabled, all living with partners who provided a full range of care. Both partners were interviewed separately about their motivation to give care, dependency on help, the continuation of caregiving and their relationship. The analysis consisted of fragmenting and connecting the data and involved close reading and constant comparison. The findings support previous studies: continuation of caregiving is the result of an interchange between the partners. The commitment established can be expressed in terms of inevitability, shared misfortune, reciprocity and the desire to prevent admission to a nursing home. Three aspects appear to contribute to the creation of commitment and the ensuing continuation of caregiving: marital loyalty, the arbitrariness of the disease, and its serious nature. For community care it is important to consider the negotiations between partners and the impact of caregiving on their relationship.

Book

Higher education and disabilities: international approaches

Editor:
HURST Alan
Publisher:
Ashgate
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
245p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Contains papers on: disability services in Australian universities; the impact of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 on tertiary education in Australia; supporting students with disabilities in Belgium; policy and provision of support services in Canadian universities; Canadian universities and the status of disabled people; students with disabilities in higher education in Finland; students with disabilities in German higher education; disabled university students in Greece; disabled students and higher education in Ireland; including students with disabilities in higher education in Lithuania; students with disabilities in the Netherlands; supporting students with disabilities in the Slovak Republic; students with disabilities in higher education in Spain; disability awareness raising and training in higher education in the United Kingdom; higher education and disability in the USA; service students with disabilities in higher education in the USA; and students with disabilities and international exchanges.

Book

Welfare to work in practice: social security and participation in economic and social life

Editors:
SAUNDERS Peter, (ed.)
Publisher:
Ashgate
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
261p.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

This book brings together some of the leading  experts to discuss the rationale for welfare to work policies, their limitations and problems encountered in practice. Contributors address topics ranging from the linkages between social security and the labour market to how the welfare to work agenda is responding to the needs of special groups such as lone parents, the long-term unemployed and those with a disability. The book puts the arguments and ideas that underlie the new welfare reform agenda under the microscope and explains how it is being implemented in an international context. Several new data sets are analyzed in a collection that covers developments in Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, Norway, the UK and the US, as well as several comparative studies. In doing so, this volume helps to bridge the gap between research and policy and demonstrates how policy can respond to the challenges it faces.

Journal article

A new approach to the qualitative evaluation of functional disability in dementia

Authors:
KURZ X., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18(11), November 2003, pp.1050-1055.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Dementia patients suffer from the progressive deterioration of cognitive and functional abilities. Instrumental disabilities usually appear in the earlier stages of the disease while basic disabilities appear in the more advanced stages. In order to differentiate between mild, moderate and severe patients both instrumental and basic functional disabilities should be taken into account simultaneously. The objective of this study was to find a new method for classifying dementia patients based on their disabilities by using a basic and an instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale. Functional disability was assessed in a Belgian cohort of dementia patients using the Katz and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scales. A k-means derived clustering method allocated patients to disability clusters according to their Katz and Lawton scores. In order to validate the classification, we compared socio-demographic, clinical and costs parameters between the groups. The clustering method allocated patients between three clusters: dependent, non-dependent with instrumental functional disability (ND-IFD) and non-dependent. Dependence, as defined by these clusters, significantly correlates with age, residential setting, MMSE, patient's quality of life and costs. This new classification of patients suffering from dementia will provide better understanding of functional disabilities and will complement the evaluation of disease severity based on cognitive function.

Book

Social care in Europe

Editors:
MUNDAY Brian, ELY Peter
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
247p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Collection of articles looking at the contexts for, and the outcomes of, the diversity of social care provision by the member states of the European Union. The book first addresses how we define social care in Europe and looks at the differences between member states. Goes on to look in more detail at the context for social care provision and the constitutional framework provided by the European Union itself. Further chapters cover Europe's mixed economy of welfare and provide detailed analysis of the impact of social care provision on 3 key clients groups: children and families, disabled people and older people.

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