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Journal article

Service dogs and people with physical disabilities partnerships: a systematic review

Authors:
WINKLE Melissa;, CROWE Terry K.;, HENDRIX Ingrid;
Journal article citation:
Occupational Therapy International, 19(1), 2012, pp.54-66.

Some promising social, functional and psychological benefits were identified as possibly being associated with service dog ownership. However the evidence from the twelve studies included in this review was limited by poor study quality. Areas for further investigation are outlined, and the potential for occupational therapists to become involved in assisting clients before during and after service dog placement is discussed.

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Personal assistance for adults (19-64) with physical impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
36p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assesses the effectiveness of personal assistance for adults with physical impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Adults with physical impairments living in the community who require assistance to perform tasks of daily living and participate in normal activities due to permanent impairments were included. Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. One randomised controlled trial involving 817 participants compared personal assistance versus usual care met the selection criteria. Findings showed that whilst personal assistance was generally preferred over other services, some people prefer other models of care. Whilst paid assistance probably substitutes for informal care and may cost government more than alternatives, the total costs to recipients and society are currently unknown. Further studies are required to determine which models of personal assistance are most effective and efficient for particular people.

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Personal assistance for children and adolescents (0-18) with both physical and intellectual impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
30p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of personal assistance for children and adolescents with both physical and intellectual impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Personal assistance is defined as paid support of at least 20 hours per week for people with impairments to enable them to participate in mainstream activities. The report focuses and the methodology used in the review;  Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research. The review identified no studies that met the inclusion criteria.

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Personal assistance for adults (19-64) with both physical and intellectual impairments

Authors:
MAYO-WILSON Evan, MONTGOMERY Paul, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
46p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review aimed to assesses the effectiveness of personal assistance for adults with physical and intellectual impairments, and the impacts of personal assistance on others, compared to other interventions. Adults with permanent physical and intellectual impairments living in the community who require assistance to perform tasks of daily living and participate in everyday activities were included. Electronic databases were searched from 1980 to June 2005; reference lists were checked; 345 experts, organisations, government bodies and charities were contacted in an attempt to locate relevant research.  The review identified two studies that met the inclusion criteria, which included 1002 participants. The review found personal assistance may have some benefits for some recipients and their informal caregivers. Paid assistance probably substitutes for informal care and may cost government more than alternatives; however, some evidence suggests it may reduce costs. Further studies are required to determine which models of personal assistance are most effective and efficient for particular people.

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Personal assistance for older adults (65+) without dementia

Authors:
MONTGOMERY P., MONTGOMERY Paul, MAYO-WILSON E., DENNIS J., MAYO-WILSON Evan, DENNIS Jane
Publisher:
Campbell Collaboration
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
55
Place of publication:
Oslo

This systematic review investigated the effectiveness of personal assistance versus any other form of care for older adults. Personal assistance is defined as paid support of at least 20 hours per week for people with impairments. Four studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria, which included 1,642 participants. They suggested that personal assistance may be preferred over other services; however, some people prefer other models of care. This review indicates that personal assistance probably has some benefits for some recipients and their informal caregivers. Paid assistance might substitute for informal care and cost government more than alternative arrangements; however, the relative total costs to recipients and society are unknown. While advocates may support personal assistance for myriad reasons, this review concluded that further studies were required to determine which models of personal assistance were most effective.

Journal article

Abuse of the disabled child: a systematic review of population-based studies

Authors:
GOVINDSHENOY N., SPENCER N.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 33(5), September 2007, pp.552-558.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Systematic review of population-based studies published between 1966 and January 2006. Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Cochrane library, National Research Register, Social Sciences database and PsychInfo databases were searched for potentially relevant studies. Inclusion criteria: population-based cohort, case–control or cross-sectional studies of children <18 years of age that reported empirical data on the association of abuse with disability. Risk estimates were expressed as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) where possible. Meta-analysis was not undertaken because of heterogeneity of studies. Four studies met the inclusion criteria. Two were longitudinal studies, one was a retrospective birth cohort and the remaining study was a cross-sectional survey. Types of disability studied varied widely as did methods used to ascertain abuse and neglect. Two studies accounted for potential confounding. Three studies reported an association between psychological and emotional disabilities and abuse. Two studies reported an association of learning disability with abuse. Only one study examined the association of physical disability (cerebral palsy) with abuse reporting an adjusted odds ratio for all forms of abuse of 1.79 (95% CI 0.96, 3.36) and for physical abuse of 3.00 (95% CI 1.29, 6.78). The evidence base for an association of disability with abuse and neglect is weak. Psychological and emotional problems, and learning difficulties appear to be associated with abuse but this association might arise because these conditions share a common aetiological pathway with abuse. There is limited evidence that physical disability predisposes to abuse.

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A systematic review of the costs and effectiveness of different models of paediatric home care

Authors:
PARKER G., et al
Publisher:
NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
118p.
Place of publication:
Southampton

Technological developments in care, the impact of hospital admission on children and their families, changing policies for severely disabled children, and the costs of health care have encouraged the development of paediatric home care (PHC). However, despite increased provision, evidence about effectiveness, costs and impact remains elusive. The objectives were to establish: the range and types of PHC; the effectiveness and costs of PHC; if and how cost-effectiveness differs between different groups of children; the speed of growth of the evidence base; and  what recommendations could be made for further research.

Journal article Full text available online for free

A systematic review of instruments for assessment of capacity in activities of daily living in children with developmental co-ordination disorder

Authors:
LINDE B.W.van der, et al
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 41(1), 2015, pp.23-34.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Children with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) face evident motor difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL). Assessment of their capacity in ADL is essential for diagnosis and intervention, in order to limit the daily consequences of the disorder. The aim of this study is to systematically review potential instruments for standardized and objective assessment of children's capacity in ADL, suited for children with DCD. As a first step, databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched to identify studies that described instruments with potential for assessment of capacity in ADL. Second, instruments were included for review when two independent reviewers agreed that the instruments (1) are standardized and objective; (2) assess at activity level and comprise items that reflect ADL; and (3) are applicable to school-aged children that can move independently. Out of 1507 publications, 66 publications were selected, describing 39 instruments. Seven of these instruments were found to fulfil the criteria and were included for review: the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Performance-2 (BOT2); the Do-Eat (Do-Eat); the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (MABC2); the school-Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (schoolAMPS); the Tuffts Assessment of Motor Performance (TAMP); the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD); and the Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). As a third step, for the included instruments, suitability for children with DCD was discussed based on the ADL comprised, ecological validity and other psychometric properties. It is concluded that current instruments do not provide comprehensive and ecologically valid assessment of capacity in ADL as required for children with DCD. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What influences participation in leisure activities of children and youth with physical disabilities? A systematic review

Authors:
BULT M. K., et al
Journal article citation:
Research in Developmental Disabilities, 32(5), September 2011, pp.1521-1529.

A range of variables associated with participation in leisure activities was identified and reported in the 17 studies included in this systematic review. The bulk of the evidence comes from studies of young people with cerebral palsy, although similar variables seem to apply to children with other physical disabilities. Age was found to be an important factor that influences participation, but there is no evidence on the variables associated with different age groups. The need for more studies in more diverse populations, and a clearer definition and standardised measure of participation is emphasised.

Journal article

Systematic review of early intervention programmes for children from birth to nine years who have a physical disability

Authors:
ZIVIANI Jenny, et al
Journal article citation:
Australian Occupational Therapy, 57(4), August 2010, pp.210-223.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Ten early intervention programmes with a wide range of intervention types, participants, and outcome measures, were included in this systematic review. A number of positive outcomes, both child-related and family-related, were reported but further analysis was prevented due to methodological limitations. The need for more, well-designed studies that include baseline data, long-term follow-up and standardised outcome measures is emphasised.

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