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Book Full text available online for free

National care standards: care homes for people with physical and sensory impairment

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
76p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Sets out the National Care Standards for Care Homes for people with physical and sensory impairment.

Book

National occupational standards: sensory services: standard 4: identify and support the physical and sensory needs of individuals with complex needs

Author:
SKILLS FOR CARE AND DEVELOPMENT
Publisher:
Skills for Care and Development
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

This National Occupational Standard for Sensory services outlines the competencies required to identify and support the physical and sensory needs of individuals with complex needs. Competency elements covered are: Contribute to the assessment and identification of the individual's full range of needs in partnership with that person and other key people; Plan and agree courses of action with individuals to promote their physical, mental, emotional and other health and well-being needs; Implement actions and evaluate their effectiveness as agreed with individuals. Each competency element lists below it the necessary performance criteria. Sections of the standard can be used for staff induction, professional development and training.

Book Full text available online for free

Domiciliary care: national minimum standards; regulations

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
70p.
Place of publication:
Norwich

While broad in scope, these standards acknowledge the unique and complex needs of individuals, and the additional specific knowledge, and skills required in order to deliver a service that is tailored to the needs of each person. With the emphasis on caring for people with complex health and personal care needs living in their own home instead of in residential or nursing homes or long stay hospitals, the provision of personal domiciliary care services is evolving rapidly and reflects changes at the interface between health and social care. These standards will be applied to agencies providing personal care to the wide range of people who need care and support whilst living in their own home, including: older people, people with physical disabilities, people with sensory loss including dual sensory impairment, people with mental health problems, people with learning disabilities, children and their families, and personal or family carers.

Book Full text available online for free

New directions for independent living: inspection of independent living arrangements for younger disabled people

Author:
FRUIN David
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health. Social Services Inspectorate
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
76p.
Place of publication:
London

Report of a national programme of inspection of local authority arrangements for supporting independent living for younger disabled people. Ten councils were chosen to be broadly representative of all English councils. The inspections focused on: how independence for disabled people is being promoted; direct payments and other support; assessment and care management processes; principles; information; equality of opportunity; and management arrangements.

Book Full text available online for free

National minimum standards for care homes for younger adults

Author:
WALES. Welsh Assembly Government
Publisher:
Wales. Welsh Assembly Government
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
70p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

These National Minimum Standards are issued by the Welsh Assembly Government under section 23 of the Care Standards Act 2000. They apply to all care homes providing accommodation and nursing or personal care for adults aged 18 to 65 years who have physical disabilities, sensory disabilities, learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders, mental health problems, alcohol or substance misuse problems, HIV/AIDS, or dual and/or complex multiple disabilities. The standards cover: choice of home; individual needs and choices; lifestyle; personal and health care support; staffing; conduct and management of the home; concerns, complaints and protection; and environment. The standards are underpinned by a number of crosscutting themes: focus on service users, fitness for purpose, comprehensiveness, positive choice, meeting assessed needs, quality services, and quality workforce. There are supplementary standards for care homes accommodating young people aged 16 and 17 years.

Book Full text available online for free

National service framework for children, young people and maternity services: disabled children and young people and those with complex health needs

Authors:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
44p.
Place of publication:
London

This standard relates to children and young people who are disabled and/or those with complex health needs, including children and young people with learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders, sensory impairments, physical impairments and emotional/behavioural disorders. Many disabled children have no need for ongoing health interventions; others require ongoing treatment and/or nursing care and help with the everyday activities. Some disabled children will also be children in special circumstances. Children and young people who are disabled or who have complex health needs receive co-ordinated, high-quality child and family-centred services which are based on assessed needs, which promote social inclusion and, where possible, which enable them and their families to live ordinary lives.

Book Full text available online for free

National minimum standards for domiciliary care agencies in Wales

Author:
WALES. National Assembly
Publisher:
Wales. National Assembly
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This document sets out the National Minimum Standards for domiciliary care agencies. They form the criteria by which the Care Standards Inspectorate for Wales (“CSIW”) will determine whether the agency provides personal care to the required standard. The purpose of these minimum standards is to ensure the quality of personal care and support which people receive whilst living in their own home in the community. These standards establish the minimum required; i.e. they state a standard of service provision below which an agency providing personal care for people living in their own home must not fall. Whilst broad in scope, these Standards acknowledge the unique and complex needs of individuals and the additional specific knowledge and skills required in order to deliver a service that is tailored to the needs of each person. These Standards will be applied to agencies providing personal care to the wide range of people who need care and support whilst living in their own home, including: older people, people with physical disabilities, people with sensory loss including dual sensory impairment, people with mental health problems, people with learning disabilities, children and their families, and personal or family carers.

Book Full text available online for free

Independence matters: an overview of the performance of social care services for physically and sensory disabled people

Author:
CLARK Jan
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health. Social Services Inspectorate
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
68p.
Place of publication:
London

Physically and sensorily disabled people should be benefiting from the modernisation of social care along with other service users. This report provides evidence that although some progress is being made, it is slow and patchy and too many disabled people still do not have the opportunities they seek and the support they need to live independently and take control over their lives. The services that councils provide, both through social services and their wider functions, are essential to delivering a high quality of life for disabled people. This can only be achieved with the support and strong leadership of chief executives, directors of social services, senior managers and councillors. Using evidence from both inspections and the annual delivery and improvement statements completed by councils, the report is organised under four themes - independence at home, identity and belonging, active citizenship and systems and processes. Key areas requiring further improvement include: home care is not sufficiently reliable or flexible and is not provided in a way that promotes independence; although waiting times for equipment and minor adaptations have improved some people have to wait unacceptably long times for major adaptations using the disabled facilities grant; services for those with brain injury are not well enough developed across the country; culturally sensitive services for disabled people are not well developed; disabled parents are often not effectively supported; day services needs reshaping to be more community-based, inclusive and linked to increasing employment opportunities although the numbers receiving direct payments are increasing there is still a long way to go before they are part of mainstream provision.

Book

Getting the right start: the national service framework for children, young people and maternity services; emerging findings

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
50p.
Place of publication:
London

This NSF includes standards covering both health and social care services, and a key theme of this Emerging Findings document is the importance of integrated working between health and social care to support children who are disabled, who have mental health problems, or who are otherwise in special circumstances. For many children this joined-up working is essential to improving the quality of their lives and future life chances. The objective of this NSF is to improve the standard of services and reduce inequalities in care and support services. It provides a landmark in the development of services for children and young people and a real opportunity to give them, and pregnant women, the best start in life to prepare them for getting the most out of going to school, to deal with the problems which all children face during their childhood and, later, to take their place as active citizens in society.

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