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Journal article

Depression and frailty in later life: a synthetic review

Authors:
MEZUK Briana, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(9), September 2012, pp.879-892.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Frailty is defined as a state or indication of being vulnerable to declining health in later life. Depression in later life is predictive of many of the same kinds of outcomes as frailty, including cognitive impairment, disability, fracture, and mortality. The aim of this review was to explore the conceptual and empirical interrelationships between depression and frailty among older adults. A literature search was conducted using PubMed for publications through to 2010. Reviewers assessed the eligibility of each report and abstracted information on study design, sample characteristics, and key findings. Of these abstracted articles, 39 met the inclusion criteria. The findings from both cross-sectional and cohort studies indicated that frailty, its components, and functional impairment are risk factors for depression. Although cross-sectional studies indicated a positive association between depression and frailty, findings from cohort studies were less consistent. The majority of studies included only women and non-Hispanic Whites. None used diagnostic measures of depression or considered antidepressant use in the design or analysis of the studies.

Book

What works in services for families with a disabled child?

Authors:
BERESFORD Bryony, et al
Publisher:
Barnardo's
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
135p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Ilford

Part of Barnardos 'What Works' series, this report discusses what it views as effective practice with families who have disabled children up to the age of sixteen. While much of the evidence reviewed comes from practitioners and academics, the main source of information as to what works best comes from parents, an essential point of information as they are the ones with the hands on experience. It is also necessary to draw attention to the views of children themselves. This report acknowledges that these feature less prominently as they have not been investigated as much as the views of adults in the past.

Journal article

Examining the evidence for interventions with children with developmental coordination disorder

Author:
ARMSTRONG Dorothy
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 75(12), December 2012, pp.532-540.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

This critical review of the literature examines the evidence for the effectiveness of a selection of interventions for improving occupational performance in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The search criteria included: children whose primary diagnosis was DCD; research into the effectiveness of an intervention or interventions; interventions that fit with occupational therapy practice (although not necessarily carried out by an occupational therapist); published in peer-reviewed journals; published since 1984; and available in English. The following databases were included: EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ERIC. All articles retrieved were screened for relevance and their reference lists scanned. Nineteen articles were appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Of the approaches reviewed, the evidence points to interventions that use client’s activities of daily living as part of the intervention, such as CO-OP (Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance), as being most effective in improving occupational performance. Other approaches reviewed include; sensory integration, servomotor task training, goal-orientated group intervention, exercise programmes, and compensatory approaches.

Journal article

Impaired balance in developmental dyslexia? A meta-analysis of the contending evidence

Authors:
ROCHELLE Kim S. H., TALCOTT Joel B.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 47(11), 2006, pp.1159-1166.
Publisher:
Wiley

Developmental dyslexia is typically defined by deficits in phonological skills, but is also associated with balance impairment. Although balance assessments are included in several screening instruments for dyslexia, the association between balance and literacy problems could be the result of the high co-occurrence between dyslexia and other development disorders in which motor behaviour is affected. This meta-analysis of nine studies (15 papers) results in a mean effect size of 0.64, but this is significantly boosted by the probable co-occurrence of other developmental disorders and variability in IQ scores among the dyslexia groups. The authors conclude that balance impairment is associated with dyslexia, but that this is more strongly related to third variables other than reading ability. It is a risk indicator for developmental disorders generally, but not dyslexia specifically.

Journal article

Predicting additional care in young children with neurodevelopmental disability: a systematic review

Authors:
MEESTER-DELVER Anke, et al
Journal article citation:
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 48(2), 2006, pp.143-150.
Publisher:
John Wiley and Sons

Children with developmental disabilities have a variety of associated impairments that require lifelong additional care, and assessment of these needs is necessary not only for diagnostic purposes but to inform parents and other care givers and providers about what care is likely to be needed in the future. This review identifies and evaluates seven existing assessment instruments: Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI); Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM); Health Utility Index (HUI-3); Life Habits Assessment (LIFE-H); Lifestyle Assessment Questionnaire; Support Intensity Scale (SIS); and Amount of Assistance Questionnaire (AAQ). None have been developed to predict future additional care requirements, and the authors conclude that new instruments should be developed to provide parents and other care providers with the information they need.

Book Full text available online for free

The employment of disabled people in the public sector: a review of data and literature

Authors:
HIRST Michael, et al
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
169p.
Place of publication:
York

The proposed duty on the public sector to promote disability equality will require employers to take action in areas which are currently under-developed such as: involving disabled staff; training and awareness raising; monitoring disability within the workforce and among job applicants; and taking an organisation-wide strategic approach. Guidance needs to convince employers of the value to them of taking action, involving a prior understanding of what motivates them to change.

Journal article

Violence in deaf and hard-of-hearing people: a review of the literature

Authors:
VERNON McKay, GREENBERG Sheldon
Journal article citation:
Aggression and Violent Behavior, 4(3), 1999, pp.259-272.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The few available studies on the relationship of hearing loss to violence indicate that the prevalence of brain damage, learning disability, communication disorders, educational retardation, unemployment and underemployment in the deaf and hard-of-hearing population creates frustration which tends to manifest in disproportionate aggression, violence and hostility. Relative to prevalence, hearing impaired people are overly represented in the prison population, which is the major datum the literature on violence and hearing loss yields. Discusses reasons for the lack of literature on hearing loss and violence and suggests ways to remedy the problem.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 4: transition of young people with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses from children's to adults' services

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2005
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

A web-based briefing providing a concise summary of the current knowledge base on transition of young people with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses from children's to adults' services. Coverage includes ethical considerations, views of service users and carers, innovative practice examples and implications for practice. Also highlights additional contacts and resources. The briefing was commissioned by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). The latest edition of this Briefing was produced in April 2005 and the next updated is due in April 2006.

Journal article

Social participation of teenagers and young adults with developmental co-ordination disorder and strategies that could help them: results from a scoping review

Authors:
GAGNON-ROY M., JASMIN E., CAMDEN C.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 42(6), 2016, pp.840-851.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Background: The impact of developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) on teenagers' and young adults' participation is not well documented. This article aims to synthesize the current knowledge on social participation, which is the performance of an individual in realizing his or her daily activities and social roles within its life environment. Strategies and interventions to support youths (15–25 years old) with DCD were also synthesized. Methods: A scoping review interrogating three databases and using ‘snowballing techniques’ was performed to identify both scientific and grey literature published between 2004 and 2014. Over 1000 documents were screened and 57 were read in full; 28 met inclusion criteria. A charting form based on 12 life habits described in the disability creation process and developed by two reviewers was used to extract data and report the results. Results: All life habits were reported to be affected for teenagers and young adults with DCD, with education and interpersonal relationships being the most frequently discussed. During adolescence and adulthood, new tasks and subsequent difficulties emerge, such as driving. Mental health difficulties emerged as a key theme. Few strategies and interventions were described to support social participation of youths with DCD. Conclusion: Many life habits are challenging for youths with DCD, but few evidence-based strategies and interventions have been designed to help them to increase their social participation. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

People with physical impairments and mental health support needs: a critical review of the literature

Author:
MORRIS Jenny
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
53p.
Place of publication:
York

This report reviews the literature on the mental health support needs of people with physical impairments. The review is divided into two parts. The first part reviews research literature concerned with psychology, psychiatry and rehabilitation services. The second part of the review looks at what is known about the mental health support needs and experiences of people with physical impairments from a social model perspective. It was the first stage of a research project. (Edited publisher abstract)

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