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Consultation on private fostering: proposed new regulations, national minimum standards and guidance

Author:
WALES. Welsh Assembly Government
Publisher:
Wales. Welsh Assembly Government
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
104p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

A privately fostered child is one who is under the age of 16 (under 18 if (s)he is disabled) and who is cared for and accommodated by someone other than a parent, other person with parental responsibility or close relative. A child is not privately fostered if the person caring for him/her has done so for fewer than 28 days and does not intend to do so for longer than that. Carers and parents are required to notify the local social services authority in the area where the private fostering placement is made. The authority has the duty to satisfy itself that the welfare of the child concerned is safeguarded and promoted and may impose conditions on, or prohibit, the private fostering arrangement. The extended duties to be placed on local social services authorities are: to be satisfied as to the welfare of children who are proposed to be, or are being, privately fostered; and · to monitor the way they discharge those duties.

Book Full text available online for free

Regulations on extension of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995 to cover general qualifications bodies: consultation

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Education and Skills
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Education and Skills
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

This is a consultation on two sets of draft regulations for the extension of the Disability Discrimination Act to cover general qualifications bodies. The implementation date for these regulations is to be 1 September 2007.

Book Full text available online for free

Helping people achieve their full potential: improving specialist disability employment services: public consultation

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department for Work and Pensions
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
88p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Central proposals in the consultation include developing and enhancing the role of Disability Employment Advisers in Jobcentre Plus so that each individual gets support that is tailored to their needs to help them achieve their employment goals; and moving away from separate programmes of support such as the Job Introduction Scheme, Work Preparation and WORKSTEP towards a single integrated programme which provides a more personalised employment service for disabled people. The proposals in the consultation complement other major reforms by the DWP aimed at supporting those who need the most help to find, retain and progress in work; including the modernisation of Remploy, Pathways to Work and a Flexible New Deal all of which will offer additional specialist help for people with greater support needs.

Book

Delivering adaptations: desk guide; a consultation paper

Authors:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Stationery Office,|Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
50p.
Place of publication:
London

The principal aim of this document is to offer advice to local authorities on how they can establish a first class service which can deliver adaptations to the homes of disabled people in order to meet their needs and statutory entitlements. The document sets out: the key principles which should lie at the heart of designing an adaptations service; the legislative context underlying the requirement to provide the service; and the key components required to make an adaptations service fit for purpose.

Book Full text available online for free

Good practice guidance: consultation with equalities groups

Author:
REID-HOWIE ASSOCIATES
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
38p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Good practice guidance - consultation with equalities groups: a summary

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Equality Unit
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book

Achieving best evidence in criminal proceedings: guidance for vulnerable or intimidated witnesses, including children: consultation paper

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Home Office. Communication Directorate
Publisher:
Great Britain. Home Office. Communication Directorate
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
119p.
Place of publication:
London

The principal areas, which require attention if the needs of vulnerable witnesses whether adults or children are to be met, are: the recognition and subsequent reporting of crime; the identification of vulnerabilities; and putting effective measures to address these into place during investigation, pre-trial preparation and during and after any criminal trial. Children are defined as vulnerable by reason of their age. The Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 acknowledges that all children under 17 years of age, appearing as defence or prosecution witnesses in criminal proceedings, are eligible for Special Measures to assist them in providing their evidence and having their evidence heard at court. Early identification of the individual abilities as well as disabilities of each vulnerable adult is important in order to guide subsequent planning. An exclusive emphasis upon disability ignores the strengths and positive abilities which a vulnerable individual possesses. Vulnerable witnesses may have had social experiences which may have implications for the investigation and any subsequent court proceedings. Research suggests that sexual offences, assaults, and those offences where the victim knew the offender are particularly likely to lead to intimidation of witnesses. It seems likely that crimes which involved repeated victimisation such as stalking and racial harassment are also particularly likely to lead to intimidation. In addition, some witnesses to other crimes may be under fear and distress and may require safeguarding and support in order to give their best evidence.

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