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Book

Disabled people and employment: a review of research and development work

Authors:
BARNES Helen, THORNTON Patricia, CAMPBELL Sue Maynard
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
64p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

Review of research and development initiatives intended to help disabled people get or stay in work, which takes the views of disabled people themselves as a yardstick by which to assess good practice. Draws on broad based consultations, pinpoints gaps in existing research, and highlights the varying requirements of disabled people, employers and service providers as users of research. Also identifies a need for the wide variety of development initiatives which exist to be more effectively targeted, more systematically evaluated, and brought to the attention of a much wider audience.

Book

Employment policies for disabled people: a review of legislation and services in fifteen countries

Authors:
LUNT Neil, THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Employment
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
222p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Sheffield

Contains detailed accounts of the current situation in all countries looked at, and in depth reports on France, Germany and the United States.

Journal article

Disability and employment: towards an understanding of discourse and policy

Authors:
LUNT Neil, THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 9(2), 1994, pp.223-238.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Explores the nature of disability employment policy drawing on evidence from fifteen countries. In line with earlier sociological approaches to disability it describes to ways of framing policy in this area. These two paradigms are developed and used to critically evaluate employment policy under the headings: legislative measures, open employment-financial measures, employment support services and sheltered/supported provision. The dilemmas that may arise during implementation of policy are discussed and the consequences for the construction of an emancipatory employment policy. Finally, suggestions are mode for themes or dimensions that a coherent disability policy should have.

Journal article

Disability

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 19, April 2005, pp.17-22.
Publisher:
Community Care

Reports on research carried out at Loughborough University which set out to construct budget standards for disabled people with different levels and types of need, based on the group's own judgements on the minimum requirements for an acceptable and equitable quality of life. The research had three phases, each involving five focus groups with disabled people with a mix of ages and socio-economic backgrounds.

Book Full text available online for free

What works and looking ahead: UK policies and practices facilitating employment of disabled people

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
67p.
Place of publication:
York

There is unprecedented policy commitment to raise the employment level of disabled people, as part of a wider strategy to tackle poverty, social exclusion, discrimination and welfare dependency. Government is committed to evidence-based policy making, and this paper brings together detailed evidence from robust and high quality research on ‘what works’.

Book Full text available online for free

Desirable outcomes of of WORKSTEP: user and provider views

Authors:
MEAH Angela, THORNTON Patricia
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
110p.
Place of publication:
London

In this report disabled people said it was important to set themselves goals and experience achieving them. Achieving things through their jobs, they said, encouraged them to set goals outside work, like learning to travel independently or to drive. Going to work gave disabled people the chance to meet new people and make friends. This was especially important to people with learning disabilities who complained of feeling bored when ‘stuck at home’. The routine of work was important to people with mental health conditions. They said it offered a distraction from their condition and gave them a sense of an ‘ordinary life’. Disabled people said that having a job was a sign of ‘wellness’ and getting on with life.

Journal article

Disability

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 2000, 2000, pp.8-10.
Publisher:
Community Care

Direct payments are designed to allow disabled people to purchase their own services, so that they themselves can tailor their care to their needs. But recent research suggests that the payments have had mixed results in helping them to escape the cycle of social exclusion.

Journal article

Please ring for service

Authors:
THORNTON Patricia, MOUNTAIN Gail
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 11.6.92, 1992, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Describes research which shows that new approaches to community alarm systems can be used as a means of helping elderly people to live independently.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Under occupied

Authors:
HIRST Michael, THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 2.06.05, 2005, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Under a duty to promote equality of opportunity in the Disability Discrimination Act 2005, public authorities will have to act against systematic discrimination in employment of disabled people. Draws on the results of surveys which show that despite a rise in disabled employees in the public sector, there has been no change in the proportions of the disabled and non-disabled populations employed.

Journal article

Disability

Author:
THORNTON Patricia
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 2004, 2004, pp.17-22.
Publisher:
Community Care

Part of a special issue focusing on the Children Bill and the green paper, Every Child Matters, arguing that the latter is short on solutions to support disabled children's parents but some schemes are pointing the way. Argues the paper could be more sensitive to circumstances and needs: disabled children who attend special schools some distance from home; the effect of inadequate transport; care before and after school; parents in work taking jobs below their skill levels; better integration - families complain of having to repeat their story to different people; one main contact; and schemes rooted in established multi-agency working.

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