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Digital Media Full text available online for free

Fluctuating needs: the Care Act 2014

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
6 minutes 56 seconds
Place of publication:
London

Under the Care Act 2014, assessments should reflect more accurately a comprehensive picture of people's needs - including how they change over time. In this film two people, one with mental health needs, the other with a physical disability, talk about their conditions, assessment, how their needs can fluctuate and the impact this has on the level of care and support they need. The film illustrates how the new requirement aims to recognise people as individuals by endorsing a much-needed degree of flexibility and responsive care, as well as offering valuable support for people with mental health and physical health conditions which may vary over time. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Quality in social care: achieving excellence in home care

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
19 minutes 48 seconds
Place of publication:
London

Service users get together with a social care academic and a leader in the home care sector to discuss how excellence can be achieved in domiciliary care.  We see examples of excellence in support offered to older people, people with learning disabilities and people with physical disabilities in their own homes.  Much of the focus is on the relationship between staff members and the people they support because getting that right is fundamental to excellent care. This film has now been revised. This film was previously available under the title 'Defining excellence: excellence in domiciliary care '. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 4: transition of young people with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses from children's to adults' services

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2005
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

A web-based briefing providing a concise summary of the current knowledge base on transition of young people with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses from children's to adults' services. Coverage includes ethical considerations, views of service users and carers, innovative practice examples and implications for practice. Also highlights additional contacts and resources. The briefing was commissioned by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). The latest edition of this Briefing was produced in April 2005 and the next updated is due in April 2006.

Digital Media

Defining excellence: excellence in domiciliary care

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2012
Place of publication:
London

Service users get together with a social care academic and a leader in the home care sector to discuss how excellence can be achieved in domiciliary care.  We see examples of excellence in support offered to older people, people with learning disabilities and people with physical disabilities in their own homes.  Much of the focus is on the relationship between staff members and the people they support because getting that right is fundamental to excellent care. This film has now been revised and is available under the new title 'Quality in social care: achieving excellence in home care'.

Book Full text available online for free

Personalisation briefing: implications for occupational therapists in social care

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

This briefing examines the implications of the personalisation agenda for occupational therapists. Personalisation for occupational therapists in social care means: understanding and embracing the social model of disability; providing choice, control and a person-centred approach to assessment/review and delivery of support and services. A number of brief case studies illustrate the ways in which occupational therapists can support personalisation.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Personalisation for someone with a physical disability

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2009
Place of publication:
London

This video introduces Stephen Page, a man with Multiple Sclerosis. He emphasises how important it is that he can relate to his PA and chat with her as well as receiving personal assistance and help with basic tasks. Maintaining his social and cultural life is very important to Stephen and having a personal budget has enabled him to continue to attend events which help him to lead his chosen life and preserve his personal identity. He is a creative and talented person who needs to maintain his interests and activities for his own well-being. Stephen emphasises that personalisation can support people as individuals.

Book Full text available online for free

Will community-based support services make direct payments a viable option for black and minority ethnic service users and carers?

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, STUART Ossie
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
London

This discussion paper considers the characteristics of social care organisations that successfully promote diversity, and explores research on barriers to promoting diversity, as well as how these can be overcome. After exploring use of the term ‘diversity’, the authors suggest that diversity is used to mean taking account of the complexities of the lives of individuals and of groups of people, and the impact of these complexities on their experience of discrimination and disadvantage. In this context, the focus is on black and minority ethnic people as a group with multiple identities. So an organisation that successfully promotes diversity will take account of age, disability, gender and ‘race’ issues. In practice this could mean extending choice and control to a disabled Asian woman wanting to live ‘independently’ in an extension to her parents’ home, as well as to a 70-year-old Caribbean man with chronic arthritis living on his own in a council flat. This discussion paper draws on census data to demonstrate higher rates of long-term limiting illness and disability among black and minority ethnic communities in comparison to white communities, and in women in these communities more than men. This data is supplemented by evidence of a greater risk of unemployment and lower incomes amongst black and minority ethnic groups, and of poorer-quality housing. Black and minority ethnic communities are also less likely to benefit from a range of government initiatives that deal with social exclusion.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 18: being a father to a child with disabilities: issues and what helps

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2005
Place of publication:
London

SCIE research briefings summarise the knowledge base in a particular area and act as signpost to more in-depth material. The topic of this briefing is the fathers of children with disabilities, impairments or chronic illness. The children's disabilities include physical or sensory impairments, learning disability, and chronic conditions such as asthma, arthritis, diabetes and congenital heart disease. This briefing focuses on fathers' experiences of their child's disability and their resulting needs. The briefing is divided into sections: what does the research show; organisational knowledge; policy community knowledge; practitioner knowledge; research knowledge; user and carer knowledge; and useful links.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 13: helping parents with a physical or sensory impairment in their role as parents

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2005
Place of publication:
London

SCIE research briefings summarise the knowledge base in a particular area and act as signpost to more in-depth material. The topic of this briefing is parents with physical or sensory impairments and ways of addressing any perceived barriers to their parenting. This briefing does not consider any supposed impact of a parent’s disability on their children, but only describes some of the specialist requirements of parents with physical or sensory impairments. The briefing is divided into sections: what does the research show; organisational knowledge; policy community knowledge; practitioner knowledge; research knowledge; user and carer knowledge; and useful links.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Supporting parents with additional needs

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 6.11.08, 2008, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Summarises some of the key messages from a recent SCIE knowledge review, 'Supporting disabled parents and parents with additional support needs'. The knowledge review aimed to define the needs of parents at different stages of parenthoods and assess the type of support that they needed at each stage.

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