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Results 1 - 9 of 9

Journal article

Defending the social model

Authors:
SHAKESPEARE Tom, WATSON Nicholas
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 12(2), April 1997, pp.293-300.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Discusses the social model of disability and how it has had a limited impact in areas other than disability studies.

Journal article

Back to the future? new genetics and disabled people

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 44/45, Autumn 1995, pp.22-35.
Publisher:
Sage

Attempts to put developments in molecular biology into the broader context of disability rights and the relationship between disabled people and medical science. Suggests that disabled people have not been consulted or involved in debates around the new genetics and that a wider discussion of these developments is urgently needed.

Book Full text available online for free

A small matter of equality: living with restricted growth

Authors:
SHAKESPEARE Tom, WRIGHT Michael, THOMPSON Sue
Publisher:
Restricted Growth Association
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
Yeovil

Adults with restricted growth, or dwarfism, are far more disabled by social barriers and by medical problems than has previously been realised, according to this report. A team of researchers at Newcastle University, led by sociologist Dr Tom Shakespeare and geneticist Dr Michael Wright, conducted the three-year study, which was managed by the Restricted Growth Association. The study is the largest research project of its kind to have been carried out into the quality of life of adults affected by conditions that cause restricted growth. Restricted Growth affects approximately one in 10,000 births each year. Some 75 per cent of individuals born with restricted growth conditions are born to two parents of average height. One of the key findings of the study was that almost all restricted growth people suffer unwanted public attention. Some 97 per cent of respondents said they have experienced name calling, while others cited problems with abuse including mockery, and sometimes even physical violence.

Journal article

Choices and rights: eugenics, genetics and disability equality

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 13(5), November 1998, pp.665-681.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article explores some current issues in human genetics and pre-natal diagnosis and develops an informed analysis from a disability equality perspective.

Journal article

Disability, genetics and global justice

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 4(1), January 2005, pp.87-95.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Genetic developments are viewed with distrust by the disability rights community. But the argument that genetic screening promotes social injustice is not straightforward. Disabled people are affected by both the problems of impairment and the problems of disability. Preventing impairment should be a priority as well as preventing disability. Questions of social justice arise if biomedical approaches are prioritized at the cost of structural changes in society. They also arise when disabled people do not have access to genetic medicine. On a global scale, the priorities for impairment prevention are basic healthcare, not high technology medicine.

Book

Imagining welfare: help

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Publisher:
Venture Press/British Association of Social Workers
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
110p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Explores the social relations of care from a disability studies perspective. Discusses the concept of giving and receiving help in terms of colonialisation and of the 'other'. Describes those who receive help and the social treatment and cultural constructions which render them excluded; those who give help, whether professionals, relatives or volunteers; the relationship between helpers and the helped, particularly in its institutional forms; and suggests alternative approaches that may resolve the problematic aspects of these relationships.

Journal article

Cultural representation of disabled people: dustbins for disavowal?

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 9(3), 1994, pp.283-299.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Impairment and imagery are neglected within the social model approaches to disability. This is connected to a neglect of representation. Comparing the experience of disabled people to that of women, the author explores the prejudice underlying cultural representation, using a variety of theoretical models, and concludes by suggesting an explanation for popular prejudice against disabled people.

Book

Disability/postmodernity: embodying disability theory

Editors:
CORKER Marian, SHAKESPEARE Tom
Publisher:
Continuum
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
249p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

This book offers a bridge between social science perspectives on disability (predominant in disability studies in the UK for example) and humanities perspectives (which dominate the US approach). The authors aim to demystify the concept of postmodernity and to suggest ways in which it fosters a holistic approach to the study of disability that better represents and reflects the complexity of disabled people's experience. The book opens with an exploration of theoretical perspectives, looking especially at the body and at concepts of difference and identity. The second section deals with culture, discussing aesthetics, narrative, film, architecture and design, while the final section explores social practice, discussing issues which include disabled children's perspectives, sexual identity and 'madness and distress.'

Book

Disability rights and wrongs

Author:
SHAKESPEARE Tom
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
232p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Over the last thirty years, the field of disability studies has emerged from the political activism of disabled people. In this challenging review of the field, leading disability academic and activist Tom Shakespeare argues that social model theory has reached a dead end. Drawing on a critical realist perspective, Shakespeare promotes a pluralist, engaged and nuanced approach to disability. Key topics discussed include: dichotomies - the dangerous polarisations of medical model versus social model, impairment versus disability and disabled people versus non-disabled people; identity - the drawbacks of the disability movement's emphasis on identity politics; bioethics in disability - choices at the beginning and end of life, and in the field of genetic and stem cell therapies; and care and social relationships - questions of intimacy and friendship. This stimulating and accessible book challenges orthodoxies in British disability studies, promoting a new conceptualization of disability and fresh research agenda. It is an invaluable resource for researchers and students in disability studies and sociology, as well as professionals, policy makers and activists.

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