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Journal article

Increases in wheelchair use and perceptions of disablement

Authors:
SAPEY Bob, STEWART John, DONALDSON Glenis
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(5), August 2005, pp.489-505.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Between 1986 and 1995, there appeared to be a 100% increase in the number of wheelchair users in England and Wales. This article reports some of the findings of a study designed to explore the social implications of this increase. Specifically, it examines the various explanations for the increases and concludes that whilst demographic changes or research methodologies are not responsible, the more likely causes are changing prescription practice, medical advances and changing attitudes to disablement. The article then explores the latter explanation by examining perceptions of wheelchair use, contrasting clinical and user views gained from in-depth interviews. It also reports findings from part of a large-scale postal survey of wheelchair users, which examined their attitudes toward different models of disability. It concludes that the responses of a large majority of wheelchair users of all ages are better explained by the social model of disability than any other.

Journal article

Out of touch: local government and disabled people's employment needs

Authors:
PIGGOTT Linda, SAPEY Bob, WILENIUS Fred
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 20(6), October 2005, pp.599-611.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

In autumn 2003 the authors contracted to undertake a study in two district council areas of ways in which they could meet their Local Public Service Agreement (LPSA) targets in respect of disabled people returning to work. The authors undertook a literature review of barriers to work, interviewed a number of people involved in working with unemployed people and a number of disabled people in these areas. All the employment organisations we had contact with were working to an individual model of disability and the need to change their orientation became the central recommendation of the first phase of this study. This was rejected by those funding the study. At the end of the first year none of the organisations active in this area was able to identify a single disabled person who had returned to work as a result of their help. We conclude that central government policies are doing little to change the perception of the employment needs of disabled people within local government.

Journal article

Disablement in the informational age

Author:
SAPEY Bob
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 15(4), June 2000, pp.619-636.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper article employment data from the USA and UK on the process of informationalisation, in order to ascertain if it is having a particular impact on the construction of disablement. It finds that disabled people are more likely to be excluded from employment in the informational sector and that the current reforms of welfare may remove some of the safety net provision that have been part of the hegemony of care established under industrialisation. It concludes by suggesting that social exclusion, which removes the notion of deservingness, may replace disability as a social process in the twenty-first century.

Book Full text available online for free

Access to practice: overcoming the barriers to practice learning for disabled social work students

Authors:
SAPEY Bob, TURNER Rosemary, ORTON Sue
Publisher:
SWAPltsn
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
69p.
Place of publication:
Southampton

The introduction of the Disability Discrimination Act Part 4 requires institutions to ensure that learning and teaching practices are accessible to disabled students. Under the Act there is also a responsibility to make anticipatory adjustments and this will lead to the development of proactive practices, not merely responding to issues as they arise. There will be a need for the academic community, in conjunction with partners, toensure an equality of opportunity for disabled students. For social work, and other subject disciplines, it is vital that the profession reflects the wider composition of the communities it serves. This guide has been produced at an opportune time as it will support a drive to increase the number of disabled students undertaking the new degree in social work.

Book

Social work with disabled people

Authors:
OLIVER Michael, SAPEY Bob
Publisher:
Macmillan
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
128p.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke

Introduction to social work with disabled people. Includes chapters on: old and new directions in social work with disability; thinking about disability; the causes of impairment and the creation of disability; disability in the family; living with disabilities; the legal and social context of disability; and some professional and organisational aspects of social work with disabled people.

Journal article

Advocacy skills needed to deal with grant problems

Author:
SAPEY Bob
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, June 1995, p.19.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Argues that social workers should be concerned about the means test for Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG).

Journal article

'Community Care' - reinforcing the dependency of disabled people

Author:
SAPEY Bob
Journal article citation:
Applied Community Studies, 1(3), 1992, pp.21-29.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

By considering the ideological basis of a range of welfare policies from the Poor Law to the NHS and Community Care Act, identifies how those policies have helped to created dependency and in doing so, to oppress disabled people. The central argument is that the current community care policies share an ideology with the Poor Law and the National Assistance Act. As such it is unlikely to bring about a less oppressive model of welfare as far as disabled people are concerned. Some alternatives that have been proposed by disabled people are discussed, and considers the support received in recent years from some feminist social policy writers. Proposals for change at both structural and institutional levels are drawn from the experience of the USA. Questions whether such alternatives would be feasible in Britain, and more pertinently, questions the effect of implementing community care policies without a fundamental rethinking of their ideological bases.

Book

Social work with disabled people

Authors:
OLIVER Michael, SAPEY Bob
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
218p.
Place of publication:
Basingstoke
Edition:
3rd ed.

Introduction to social work with disabled people. Includes chapters on: old and new directions in social work with disability; thinking about disability; the causes of impairment and the creation of disability; disability in the family; living with disabilities; the legal and social context of disability; and some professional and organisational aspects of social work with disabled people

Journal article

At last, support without the stigma

Author:
SAPEY Bob
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, December 1997, p.7.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Explains why social workers should actively support direct payments.

Journal article

Disabling homes: a study of the housing needs of disabled people in Cornwall

Author:
SAPEY Bob
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 10(1), 1995, pp.71-85.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

The study was an evaluation of housing need of disabled people who were wheelchair users through a process of consumer consultation. It was concerned to find out the extent and nature of that need whilst also testing out consultation through the use of research methods in comparison with a non-consultative approach taken by the local authorities. The nature of need was found to be qualitatively different to that found through the study of normative needs. A significant number of disabled people were being made more dependent by their housing and this was being reinforced by the agencies that were intended to help them. In particular, the failure to consult disabled people was leading the local authorities to make inappropriate plans for new build housing while the major need for adaptations was being undermined by their operation of the Disabled Facilities Grant. The findings support the call from other writers that the solutions to housing problems will only come through viewing disability as a civil rights issue.

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