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Book Full text available online for free

Disability and employment in Scotland: a review of the evidence base (full text)

Authors:
RIDDELL Sheila, TINKLIN Theresa, BANKS Pauline
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive Social research
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
148p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Disability and employment in Scotland: a review of the evidence base (summary)

Authors:
RIDDELL Sheila, TINKLIN Theresa, BANKS Pauline
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive Social research
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Disability in Scotland: a baseline study

Authors:
RIDDELL Sheila, BANKS Pauline
Publisher:
Strathclyde Centre for Disability Research
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
144p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow
Journal article

Social justice and disabled people: principles and challenges

Authors:
GOODLAD Robina, RIDDELL Sheila
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 4(1), January 2005, pp.45-54.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Social justice is a policy aim of the UK Labour government. This paper considers the applicability of the concept to disability, seeking to establish principles for conceptualising social justice and disability and considering the nature of the challenges for public policy and society posed by this conceptualisation. The paper considers how disability is implicated in two types of claims about the source of social injustice: those concerned with socially constructed differences between people; and those arising from material inequalities. Appropriate values underpinning alternative conceptions of social justice are discussed and tensions in policymaking considered.

Journal article

The development of direct payments in the UK: implications for social justice

Authors:
RIDDELL Sheila, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Society, 4(1), January 2005, pp.75-85.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Direct payments have been heralded by the disability movement as an important means to achieving independent living and hence greater social justice for disabled people through enhanced recognition as well as financial redistribution. Drawing on data from the ESRC funded project Disabled People and Direct Payments: A UK Comparative Perspective, this paper presents an analysis of policy and official statistics on use of direct payments across the UK. It is argued that the potential of direct payments has only partly been realised as a result of very low and uneven uptake within and between different parts of the UK. This is accounted for in part by resistance from some Labour-controlled local authorities, which regard direct payments as a threat to public sector jobs. In addition, access to direct payments has been uneven across impairment groups. However, from a very low base there has been a rapid expansion in the use of direct payments over the past three years. The extent to which direct payments are able to facilitate the ultimate goal of independent living for disabled people requires careful monitoring.

Journal article

A flexible gateway to employment? Disabled people and the Employment Service's Work Preparation programme in Scotland

Authors:
RIDDELL Sheila, BANKS Pauline, WILSON Alastair
Journal article citation:
Policy and Politics, 30(2), April 2002, pp.231-230.
Publisher:
Policy Press

Provides a brief discussion of the historical background to employment policy for disabled people, focusing in particular on job rehabilitation and work preparation policies and programmes. Goes on to discuss the nature and outcomes of the Work Preparation Programme in Scotland, drawing on DfEE-funded research. Concludes that the Programme is only achieving modest gains. Particular groups of disabled people, such as people with mental health problems, have fewer opportunities to participate and poorer outcomes. Better outcomes may be achieved if additional and ongoing support for disabled people with higher support needs were available.

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