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Book Full text available online for free

A new vision for adult social care: scoping service users' views

Authors:
HUDSON Bob, DEAREY Melissa, GLENDINNING Caroline
Publisher:
University of York. Social Policy Research Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
42p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

In order to ascertain the ideas and views of service users, the researchers made contact with an extensive list of organisations that represent the interests of service users. The researchers aimed to reflect the entire spectrum of potential users of adult social care services and included organisations representing disabled adults, older people, family carers, drug and alcohol users and other groups of service users.  The paper is in three sections. Section 1 looks at the desired outcomes of a new approach from the perspective of users of services. Section 2 identifies the service principles that would underpin the accomplishment of the outcomes identified in Section 1. Section 3 identifies some implementation issues concerned with matters of structure and process.

Journal article

The right remit

Authors:
BEWLEY Catherine, GLENDINNING Caroline
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 7.4.94, 1994, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

For community care plans to be drawn up it is essential that users are consulted. Although disabled people are being involved in plans, the authors' research raises questions about how representatives of disabled people are chosen and highlights the negative effects of asking people questions which are inappropriate to their situation. Newer organisations of disabled people, advocacy groups and black and ethnic minority community groups are less likely to belong to more established networks and therefore will miss out on consultation.

Journal article

Representing the views of disabled people in community care planning

Authors:
BEWLEY Catherine, GLENDINNING Caroline
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 9(3), 1994, pp.301-314.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This paper gives a critical account of the different ways in which the views of disabled people are sought and represented in community care planning; and of the organisational and practical barriers which disabled people and their organisations are likely to encounter in representing their views to service planners.

Journal article

Under strain? Exploring the troubled relationship between health and social care

Authors:
GLENDINNING Caroline, HUDSON Bob, MEANS Robin
Journal article citation:
Public Money and Management, 25(4), August 2005, pp.245-251.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Relationships between the NHS and social care services over the past 25 years have a poor history.  This article examines the strategies that have been used by central government and by local NHS and social care organizations to overcome difficulties of service co-ordination in relation to services for older people and disabled adults. The article is written from the perspective of the NHS. The authors conclude that policies reflecting 'networked' modes of governance may stand the best chance of success, although evidence of improved impact and outcomes still remains scarce.

Journal article

Dependence, independence or inter-dependence? Revisiting the concepts of 'care' and 'dependency'

Authors:
FINE Michael, GLENDINNING Caroline
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 25(4), July 2005, pp.601-621.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Research and theory on ‘dependency’ and ‘care-giving’ have to date proceeded along largely separate lines, with little sense that they are exploring and explaining different aspects of the same phenomenon. Research on ‘care’, initially linked to feminism during the early 1980s, has revealed and exposed to public gaze what was hitherto assumed to be a ‘natural’ female activity. Conversely, disability activists and writers who have promoted a social model of disability have seen the language of and the policy focus upon ‘care’ as oppressive and objectifying. ‘Dependency’ is an equally contested concept: sociologists have scrutinised the social construction of dependency; politicians have ascribed negative connotations of passivity; while medical and social policy discourse employs the term in a positivist sense as a measure of physical need for professional intervention. Autonomy and independence, in contrast, are promoted as universal and largely unproblematic goals. These contrasting perspectives have led social theory, research and policies to separate and segregate the worlds of ‘carers’ from those for whom they ‘care’. Drawing on the work of Kittay and others, this paper explores the ways in which sociological perspectives can develop new understanding of the social contexts of ‘care’ and ‘dependence’.

Journal article

New kinds of care new kinds of relationships: how purchasing services affects relationships in giving and receiving personal assistance

Authors:
GLENDINNING Caroline, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 8(3), May 2000, pp.201-211.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Draws on interviews with users of direct payments and focus group discussions with the personal assistants (PAs) who assist them with personal and daily living activities. It discusses the benefits and the drawbacks of directly employing such assistance, from the perspectives of both the purchasers and the providers of these services. The article shows that direct payments can enable disabled people to purchase a much wider range of flexible help, better continuity, greater control and an enhanced quality of life, compared with conventional services.

Book

Buying Independence: using direct payments to integrate health and social services

Authors:
GLENDINNING Caroline, et al
Publisher:
National Primary Care Research and Development Centre
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
58p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

Shows how disabled people do not make clear distinctions between 'health' and 'social' care. Through direct payments, they are able to control and integrate into their daily routines a wide range of health-related activities, such as physiotherapy and nursing tasks, in ways which offer increased independence and better quality of life, compared with conventional health services. Is extending direct payments to older people and disabled children a shift in the boundary between 'health' and 'social' services? This book explores how direct payments can improve further the integration of services from the perspectives of the users and providers involved.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The planners' well-meaning efforts that bring disillusionment

Authors:
BEWLEY Catherine, GLENDINNING Caroline
Journal article citation:
Care Plan, 3(3), March 1997, pp.12-14.
Publisher:
Positive Publications/ Anglia Polytechnic University, Faculty of Health and Social Work

Research on service user involvement in community care planning and service provision shows some advances but still many fundamental problems and misconceptions about the process. Provides selected findings of some of the research and highlights key points on empowerment.

Book

Involving disabled people in community care planning

Authors:
BEWLEY Catherine, GLENDINNING Caroline
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
43p.
Place of publication:
York

Report describing the realities and dilemmas of joint working between service providers, purchasers, voluntary organisations and disabled people themselves in the area of community care planning.

Book

Involving disabled people in community care planning: the first steps; an analysis of community care plans for England and Wales 1992

Authors:
GLENDINNING Caroline, BEWLEY Catherine
Publisher:
University of Manchester. Department of Social Policy and Social Work
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
Manchester

Research study looking at the extent to which people with disabilities have been involved in and consulted about the community care plans in their area.

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