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Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 1 introduction

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Many disabled parents are reluctant or even anxious about asking for help from social services. They don’t want it to look as though they are not coping or are not good enough parents. Many people think social services only get involved when something has gone wrong and their children are seen as being in need or at risk in some way. In many places social services are working out how to support disabled parents by providing the right kind of specialist adult support to parents in good time to prevent problems arising.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 8 making a complaint

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Health and social services are both required to have complaints procedures by law. Other service providers do not have procedures laid down by law in the same way, but government guidance and the Local Government Ombudsman say that they should have a clear process for dealing with complaints.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 9 advocacy, advice and legal help

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Being an advocate is a role that may be paid or voluntary. Advocacy is sometimes a free service or it may have to be paid for. Social services may meet the cost or users may pay an advocate or personal supporter from your own money or using direct payments.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 7 maternity services and support for new parents

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

The National Service Framework (NSF) for children, young people and maternity services published by the Department of Health in autumn 2004 says that it should be a priority to reduce inequalities in the health of different groups and to promote choice amongst all users of child, family and maternity support services. The section of the NSF concerned with maternity services (Standard 11), spells out in several places what this should mean in terms of providing maternity services to parents in disadvantaged communities or needing specific extra help. Primary Care Trusts are encouraged to take a careful look at the reasons why people from these groups find it difficult to access and maintain contact with maternity services and to ‘take active steps to design services that overcome these barriers to care’.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 10 contacts and publications

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
51p.
Place of publication:
London

Information about  organisations, publications and other resources that are highlighted for parentswith disabilities.

Book

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 6 direct payments and disabled parents

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Direct payments are cash alternatives to services that service users can use to meet assessed needs in the way that theyt choose. This booklet shows how they work and why disabled parents find them useful. The briefing also talks about using personal assistants to support parenting.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 3 services: how to find out about services

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London

Some disabled parents have a full community care assessment of their needs by social services, resulting in a care plan. Other parents contact social services for help only when they need to get hold of particular information, items or services. Specialist teams within health and social care services should be able to help with additional needs.

Book

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 2: what the law says

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
27p.
Place of publication:
London

Under current laws, disabled parents have the same human and civil rights as non-disabled parents. A disabled parent should not have to show that they are able to be a parent any more than a non-disabled parent would be expected to show this. It should not be harder for disabled parents to get hold of support than it is for non-disabled parents. The legal background to supporting disabled adults with their parenting role is not particularly straightforward. The way in which legislation and government guidance about services to disabled adults ties in with legislation and guidance about providing services to children is not always clear. Community care legislation, children’s legislation and anti-discrimination laws are all relevant.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 5 making a care plan to meet your needs

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

Following assessment, a care plan is made to show how users assessed health and social care needs will be met. This briefing also covers service costs, charges and review.

Book Full text available online for free

Disabled Parents Network information briefings: no. 4 getting your needs assessed

Author:
DISABLED PARENTS NETWORK
Publisher:
Disabled Parents Network
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

By law, every disabled person has the right to ask their local council to assess their need for community care. The aim should be to help disabled people to live independently and in their own homes wherever possible. The government gives guidance to local authorities about assessing disabled people’s needs and whether and how those needs should be met. A disabled person’s social roles, including parenting, should be part of a community care assessment.

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