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Journal article

Capabilities and disability: the capabilities framework and the social model of disability

Author:
BURCHARDT Tania
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 19(7), December 2004, pp.735-751.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

Seeks to illuminate the complementarity between the capabilities framework, developed by Amartya Sen and others, and the social model of disability. Common themes include the relationship between social barriers and individual limitations, the importance of autonomy and the value of freedom, and dissatisfaction with income as a measure of well-being. Bringing the 2 approaches together has implications for analysis (for example in identifying poverty or disadvantage), and for policy, which are briefly illustrated. Concludes that the capabilities framework provides a more general theoretical framework in which to locate the social model of disability, without compromising any of its central tenets; and the social model provides a thorough-going application of the capabilities framework. Each can benefit from exposure to the other.

Book

The education and employment of disabled young people: frustrated ambition

Author:
BURCHARDT Tania
Publisher:
Policy Press; Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
57p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

Developing positive aspirations is a key factor in securing good educational and occupational outcomes, and an important component of autonomy. This study compared the aspirations of young disabled and non-disabled people, and examined the extent to which those aspirations were achieved.

Journal article

Changing weights and measures: disability and child poverty

Author:
BURCHARDT Tania
Journal article citation:
Poverty, 123, Winter 2006, pp.6-9.
Publisher:
Child Poverty Action Group

There has been a fall in child poverty from its peak of one in three children in 1998/99. The author looks at how children of disabled parents and disabled children themselves have fared relative to children not affected by disability.

Journal article

The dynamics of being disabled

Author:
BURCHARDT Tania
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Policy, 29(4), October 2000, pp.645-668.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Place of publication:
Cambridge

In recent years, the dynamics of poverty and unemployment have come under increasing scrutiny, but another of the risks with which the welfare state concerns itself - disability - is still largely understood only in a static sense. This article uses longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey to investigate the complexity behind a cross-sectional snapshot. First, a breakdown is given of the working-age population who are disabled at any one time by the "disability trajectories" they follow over a seven-year period. Second, the expected duration of disability for those who become disabled during working life is examined. The results show that only a small proportion of working age people who experience disability are long-term disabled, although at any one time, long-term disabled people make up a high proportion of all disabled people. Over half of those who become limited in activities of daily living as adults have spells lasting less than two years, but few who remain disabled after four years recover. intermittent patterns of disability, particularly due to mental illness are common. Failing to distinguish the different disability trajectories people follow has led to policies which marginalise disabled people and are costly to the state.

Book

Being and becoming: social exclusion and the onset of disability

Author:
BURCHARDT Tania
Publisher:
ESRC Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion. London School of Economics
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
73p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

It is well known that many disabled people are out of work and living in poverty. But little is understood about the process of becoming disabled: who is most at risk, how it affects their income, and the impact on the rest of the family. This study, seeks to unpick the relationship between the onset of disability and social exclusion for people of working age. People in the poorest fifth of the income distribution are two-and-a-half times more likely to become disabled during a year than those in the top fifth. There is a steep gradient in risk of onset according to other indicators of disadvantage, for example educational qualifications or occupational group. This means the average fall in income associated with becoming disabled is less than might be expected, because many are already on a low income. For people not initially in employment, greater benefit entitlement can result in a small overall increase in income: an average of £17 per week for couples (2003 prices). Someone becoming disabled also affects other members of the household. In single-earner couples, even where it is not the earner who becomes disabled, one in five leave employment. In some cases this is to take on new caring responsibilities

Journal article

Disability benefit reform: falling between the stools of 'work' and 'security'?

Author:
BURCHARDT Tania
Journal article citation:
Benefits, January 2000, pp.12-19.
Publisher:
Policy Press

Looks at the government's disability benefit reforms in historical context and draws out how the treatment by the benefit system of disabled people in different circumstances has changed our time.

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