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Book Full text available online for free

Finding out about opportunities for older people: a partnership project between Older People in South Lanarkshire, Better Government for Older People and Outside the Box Development Support: aeport from the first stage ... and plans for the next stage

Author:
OUTSIDE THE BOX DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT
Publisher:
Outside the Box Development Support
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

A project that enabled older people in South Lanarkshire to find out about what is happening on other places around issues which they feel are important to the lives of older people is described. The project also enabled them to share the information and ideas with other organisation in South Lanarkshire, and with other groups of older people across Scotland. The main topics older people wanted to include in the project were employment, volunteering, arts and cultural activities, transport, training for staff and volunteers working with older people, healthy living, and regenerating a sense of community.

Book

A report on meetings held to obtain the views of older people in West Suffolk on the provision of services

Author:
WEST SUFFOLK JOINT CARE PURCHASING TEAM. Joint Strategy Group for Older People
Publisher:
West Suffolk Joint Care Purchasing Team
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
21p.,tables.
Place of publication:
Ipswich
Digital Media Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Older people's contribution to understanding and preventing avoidable hospital admissions

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
18 mins 50 secs
Place of publication:
London

This video summarises the key findings of a research project conducted by the University of Birmingham’s Health Services Management Centre and the Department of Social Policy and Social Work which interviewed 104 older people about their emergency admissions to hospital. The research looked at how the older people were admitted to hospital, whether they felt this was the best place for them and what alternatives might have been explored. Similar questions were also asked of a GP and / or hospital doctor representing as many of these older people as possible. Overall, the study found that most older people were admitted to hospital appropriately. Only nine of 104 older people (almost 9%) felt that hospital was not the right place for them. Key findings covered in the video include: delays in seeking help; prevention and early intervention; poor communication; proactive initial approaches; working with GPs and paramedics; and the underfunding of social care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Top tips for managing the crisis: older people's emergency admissions to hospital

Authors:
GLASBY Jon, et al
Publisher:
University of Birmingham. School of Social Policy
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
12
Place of publication:
Birmingham

This resource identifies ten key themes, or ‘top tips’, which could help health and social care services to reduce inappropriate hospital admissions. It has been developed from a national research project which involved interviews and focus groups with older people and their families, and front-line health and social care professionals. It is argued that these ‘perceptions’ from older people and front-line staff are important as they can have a significant impact on how people live their life and access services. The themes cover: not making older people feel they are a burden; making community alternatives to hospital easier to access; to distinguish between ‘inappropriate’ and ‘preventable’ admissions; the need for early action; the importance role of adult social care; and the importance of engaging with older people to understand and respond to the increasing number of emergency admissions. Quotations from older people, their families and professionals are included throughout to illustrate key points. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Person-centred thinking with older people: 6 essential practices

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, BOWN Helen, BAILEY Gill
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
96
Place of publication:
London

Drawing on a wealth of experience of working with older people, this book presents six essential person-centred practices. Person-centred practices are a key way to provide the best possible care and support for older people and help them to be active and valued members of the community. Each of the practices is designed to support the individual and put what is important to and for the person at the forefront of their care. Each practice has been tailored so that older people can express more easily what does and does not work for them. By actively listening and making each person feel appreciated, the practices represent practical tools for frontline practitioners to form good relationships with people in their care. With supporting stories and full colour photographs to illustrate how person-centred thinking and practice is used in real-life settings, the book contains many examples to help practitioners to overcome challenges and to implement positive, effective changes to care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Working together with older people

Authors:
UNIVERSITY OF BRIGHTON, AGE UK BRIGHTON AND HOVE
Publishers:
University of Brighton, Age UK Brighton & Hove
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
6 minutes 46 seconds
Place of publication:
Brighton

One of six films made as part of an ESRC funded participatory research project which explored what well-being means to older people and how it is generated. The research was carried out by a team of older people, university researchers and a voluntary sector manager. In this film the older people who took part in this research reflect on their experiences. The researchers discuss what they learnt about working with older people to do this research and suggest that this is useful in other contexts where groups of older people come together and share their experience and knowledge to shape services. The film is a scripted scenario based on interviews. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Older people’s views on what they need to successfully adjust to life with a hearing aid

Author:
KELLY Timothy B.
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(3), 2013, pp.293-302.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article reports a study exploring what older people believe would enable them to adjust to and gain maximum benefit from wearing a hearing aid. A mixed methods approach was employed during 2006 involving interviews with key stakeholders, a survey across three Scottish health board areas and focus groups. Nine key stakeholders from six national and local organisations were interviewed about the needs of older people being fitted with hearing aids. In total, 240 older people belonging to three different types of hearing impaired older people were surveyed: long-term users of hearing aids, new hearing aid users, and those on a waiting list from urban and rural areas (response rate = 24%). A series of eight follow-up focus groups with 31 audiology patients was held. Health professionals appeared to neglect appropriate provision of information and overly rely on technological interventions. Of 154 older people already fitted with hearing aids, only 52% of hearing aid users reported receiving enough practical help post fitting and only 41% reported receiving enough support. Approximately 40% reported not feeling confident in the use of their aids or their controls. Older people wanted more information than they received both before and after hearing aid fitting. Information provision and attention to the psychosocial aspects of care are key to enabling older people to adjust and optimise hearing aid benefit. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Perceptions and views of self-neglect: a client-centered perspective

Authors:
DAY Mary Rose, LEAHY-WARREN Patricia, MCCARTHY Geraldine
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 25(1), 2013, pp.76-94.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA
Book Full text available online for free

Understanding and improving transitions of older people: a user and carer centred approach

Authors:
ELLINS Jo, et al
Publisher:
National Institute for Health Research
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
169p.
Place of publication:
London

This project focuses on older people and their transition between different services and agencies in health and social care. Research studies and reports from inspectors have shown that older people experience many problems before, during and after transitions. This project had two key aims. First, it explored what information, support and care is needed by older people and their carers as they go through a transition. Second, the project team worked with people and organisations in four local areas to put the findings into practice. Care transitions involve far more than a move across services or settings. Participants in this study experienced transitions on a number of different levels: physical, including bodily changes as well as use of services; psychological, with changes in their identity or sense of self; and social, with changes in their relationships with partners, family and friends. These different transitions often happened simultaneously and if circumstances made coping difficult in one type of transition then it was likely to have an effect on others. Most of the suggestions participants made for improving services called for ‘micro-changes’ in the care environment and in interpersonal relationships. There was little suggestion that what was needed was new or different services; easier and earlier access to existing services emerged as a far greater priority. While these micro-changes may not cost large amounts of money, they do require committed and sustained effort to challenge existing ways of working that may be deeply ingrained in organisational and professional cultures.

Journal article

“Not just grapes and flowers”: older people's perspectives on the role and importance of hospital visiting

Authors:
GREEN Bert, et al
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 13(2), 2012, pp.82-88.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper presents findings from a service user controlled research project which sought to provide commentary by older people on their experiences as visitors to hospital or as patients receiving visitors. Nine focus groups were held with a total of 43 older people at 8 different locations in North Lancashire and South Cumbria. The participants were asked about their recent experience of hospital visiting and its value to them, given their individual circumstances and those prevailing at the hospitals. Full transcripts of digital recordings from the focus groups were analysed to identify particular concerns or vivid experiences. These were classified into the following common themes: getting there and back; on the ward; and the value of visiting. The findings suggest that visitors’ needs are not always being met. Recommendations are made that could improve hospital visiting for older people, and consequently their wellbeing, including: times and rules for visitors; the response they get from staff; the potential of older visitors to help improve the welfare of the older patient; and locating older people's wards.

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