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Book Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 28: assistive technology and older people

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, BEECH Roger, ROBERTS Diane
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
London

The term ‘assistive technology’ incorporates a wide variety of devices. Assistive technology can be supportive, preventive or responsive. The increasing proportion of older people in the population makes the use of assistive technology an attractive option in social services. Perceptions vary as to whether or not assistive technology has sufficient benefits. Existing research supports the greater use of assistive technology but further evaluation and ‘local learning’ is needed. The views and needs of people using assistive technology need to be taken into account.

Book Full text available online for free

Knowledge set and progress log for dementia care

Author:
CARE COUNCIL FOR WALES
Publisher:
Care Council for Wales
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This publication aims to help social care professionals build on the best knowledge and skills in order to deliver high-quality care to older people with dementia. Knowledge sets describe what people need to know to work within specific areas of social care. The knowledge sets provided in this publication have been developed to help employers, staff and trainers to be clear about what underpinning knowledge is needed in dementia social care. The knowledge sets are divided into 10 main areas, each of which contains a group of key learning outcomes that define what the learner needs to know. Each learning outcome in turn has an associated set of assessment criteria, which give more in-depth information about how the learner can demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes. Progress logs are included which should be completed with manager’s signatures as new ways of working are learned. Work recorded in these logs will contribute to the attainment of qualifications for social care workers.

Book Full text available online for free

Knowledge set and progress log for end of life care

Author:
CARE COUNCIL FOR WALES
Publisher:
Care Council for Wales
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
40p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This publication aims to help social care professionals build on the best knowledge and skills in order to deliver high-quality end of life care to older people. Knowledge sets describe what people need to know to work within specific areas of social care. The knowledge sets provided in this publication have been developed to help employers, staff and trainers to be clear about what underpinning knowledge is needed in end of life care. The knowledge sets are divided into 9 main areas, each of which contains a group of key learning outcomes that define what the learner needs to know. Each learning outcome in turn has an associated set of assessment criteria, which give more in-depth information about how the learner can demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes. Progress logs are included which should be completed with manager’s signatures as new ways of working are learned. Work recorded in these logs will contribute to the attainment of qualifications for social care workers.

Journal article

Training to enhance adult memory (TEAM): an investigation of the effectiveness of a memory training program with older adults

Authors:
FAIRCHILD J. Kaci, SCOGIN F.R.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 14(3), April 2010, pp.364-373.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Prior research examining the effectiveness of memory enhancement programmes targeting both objective and subjective memory has yielded results with varying degrees of success. The current investigation aimed to evaluate an in-home memory enhancement programme for older adults that emphasised the importance of both objective memory ability and subjective beliefs about one’s memory. The participants, 53 community-dwelling older adults, were assigned to either a memory enhancement condition or a minimal social support condition. The memory enhancement participants met with a trainer once a week for 6 weeks, and had 3 training sessions targeting subjective memory which included information on aging, mood and nutrition, and 3 training sessions on mnemonics to target objective memory. The results showed that those in the memory enhancement condition had significant improvement in remembering names with faces and not misplacing household objects. Additionally, those in the memory enhancement condition also reported being more content with their memory, having fewer lapses in memory, greater use of mnemonic strategies, and were less bothered by memory complaints. Regression analyses indicated that neither levels of positive nor negative affect were predictive of participants' objective and subjective memory at post-treatment. The article concludes that these results provide support for the use of memory enhancement programs for older adults.

Journal article

Institutional facilitation in sustained volunteering among older adult volunteers

Authors:
TANG Fengyan, MORROW-HOWELL Nancy, HONG Songiee
Journal article citation:
Social Work Research, 33(3), September 2009, pp.172-182.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional perspective on volunteering, this study explored what institutional facilitations are needed for sustained volunteering. The sample included 401 older adult volunteers from 13 programs across the United States. Data were collected by means of self-administrated questionnaires. Institutional facilitation was captured by volunteer role flexibility, incentive, role recognition, and training. With volunteers' age controlled for, two-level hierarchical linear models were used to assess the relationship between volunteer duration (level 1 variables) and institutional facilitation (level 2 variables) in the volunteer program. Results demonstrated that a higher level of volunteering duration was associated with institutional facilitation factors of more role recognition and more training hours. Duration was also associated with less incentive. These findings suggest that certain facilitators from organizations contribute to an extended period of commitment among older adult volunteers.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Training for older people's development

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 19.2.09, 2009, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Although human growth development (HGD), from childhood to old age, is a central requirement of qualifying social work education, the extent to which this training includes human growth development of older people (HGDOP) and the approaches used vary. This article identifies some shared aims, practice and outcomes in the teaching of HGDOP.

Book Full text available online for free

Good practice guidelines for UK clinical psychology training providers for the training and consolidation of clinical practice in relation to older people

Authors:
PSIGE, BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Publisher:
British Psychological Society
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
Leicester

Nearly a fifth (19.5 per cent) of people in the UK are aged 65 or older. They are consumers of 50 per cent of health and social care spending. Older people have at least equivalent rates of psychological distress generally as compared to younger people and show significant levels of depression and suicide as well as dementia. However, just over five per cent of the Clinical Psychology workforce specialises in work with older adults (DoH and BPS National Workforce Survey 2003) and fewer than 10 per cent of clinical psychology contacts are with older people (DOH), reflecting historical imbalances in resource allocation, under diagnosis and under treatment. The recent Workforce Survey of Applied Psychologists conducted jointly by the British Psychological Society and the Department of Health showed no proportionate growth in services to older people over the last decade.

Book

Not "them and us": simply us!: trainer's pack

Authors:
ARCHIBALD Carole, MURPHY Charlie
Publisher:
University of Stirling. Dementia Services Development Centre
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
54p.
Place of publication:
Stirling

This Training Pack is in response to many requests for training material on activities for people with dementia. The training pack helps staff to look at the why, how and what of activities. The pack has many applications but it is primarily aimed at managers and co-ordinators who train staff in their place of work. The pack helps staff to develop and improve their practice with regard to activities.

Book

The caring spirit approach to eldercare: a training guide for professionals and families

Author:
KRISEMAN Nancy L.
Publisher:
Health Professions Press
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
208p.
Place of publication:
London

Designed for staff, administrators, and family members, The Caring Spirit™ approach aims to help improve facility morale, reduce staff turnover, and prevent caregiver burnout. Additionally, the program will create a culture of caring built upon mutual respect and appreciation between staff, family members, and residents. Embracing all spiritual backgrounds and ways of relating, this creative training program reveals the positive outcomes to be gained from infusing spiritual and ethical values into daily routines.

Journal article

Effects of teaching resourcefulness skills to elders

Authors:
ZAUSZNIEWSKI J. A., et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 10(4), July 2006, pp.404-412.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The objective of this study was to examine the effects of learned resourcefulness training (LRT) on health of elders in retirement communities (RCs). In a clinical trial, 46 elders in four randomly selected RCs received resourcefulness training and were compared to 43 elders in four RCs who participated in a focused reflection reminiscence (FRR) group. The two groups were similar at baseline. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed no changes on anxiety or depression over time; however, both were significantly correlated with functional status, self-assessed health, and resourcefulness. Although main effects for group were not significant, interaction effects of group and time on self-assessed health and functional status were found. These findings suggest that although teaching resourcefulness to groups of elders in RCs may have beneficial effects on improving their perception of health and functioning over time, significant effects on mental health may not be apparent.

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