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Book

Older people in Scotland: results from the first year of the Scottish household survey

Authors:
MACDONALD Charlotte, STORKEY Helen, RAAB Gillian
Publisher:
Scottish Executive. Central Research Unit,|Stationery Office
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
84p.,tables.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report presents an analysis of data relating to older people in Scotland collected during 1999, the first year of the Scottish Household Survey (SHS). The study aims to: provide a comparative analysis of the first year of results from the SHS relating to older people, drawing where appropriate on other quantitative data sources; to combine analysis with contemporary discussion of older people's issues and identify related policy initiatives; to identify gaps in existing data sources in relation to older people and advise on outstanding issues requiring further research or data collection; and to examine the data to find out how older people live, where they live, their income and expenditure, their access to and use of local services, their leisure and learning activities, their roles as carers or as someone cared for, their opinions and attitudes, and their participation in the community.

Book Full text available online for free

Older people in Scotland: results from the first year of the Scottish Household Survey (summary)

Authors:
MACDONALD Charlotte, STORKEY Helen, RAAB Gillian
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Older people in Scotland: results from the first year of the Scottish Household Survey (full text)

Authors:
MACDONALD Charlotte, STORKEY Helen, RAAB Gillian
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
82p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book

Older people in the European Community: fact sheet special edition

Authors:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING, FAMILY POLICY STUDIES CENTRE
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing/Family Policy Studies Centre
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
17p.diags.list of orgs.bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Facts and figures on older people in the EC.

Journal article

The household structure of the elderly population in Britain

Authors:
DALE Angela, EVANDROU Maria, ARBER Sara
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 7(1), 1987, pp.37-56.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Uses nationally representative data from the General Household Survey for 1980 to investigate the household structure of the elderly in Britain. Household structure is analysed in terms of its relationship to the marital status, age, gender, and physical disability of the elderly person. 79% of the elderly live alone or with their spouse only. As many as 95% of all the elderly in non-institutional accommodation retain their own households - of the rest, the majority move to live with married children, most usually daughters.

Book

Census guide I: Britain's elderly population

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of Population Censuses and Surveys
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
12p., tables, illus.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Using discrete choice experiments to understand preferences for quality of life. Variance-scale heterogeneity matters

Authors:
FLYNN Terry Nicholas, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 70(12), June 2010, pp.1957-1965.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Health services researchers are increasingly using discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to model a latent variable, be it health, health-related quality of life or utility. Unfortunately it is not widely recognised that failure to model variance heterogeneity correctly leads to bias in the point estimates. This paper compares variance heterogeneity latent class models with traditional multinomial logistic (MNL) regression models. Using the ICECAP-O quality of life instrument which was designed to provide a set of preference-based general quality of life tariffs for the UK population aged 65+, it demonstrates that there is both mean and variance heterogeneity in preferences for quality of life, which covariate-adjusted MNL is incapable of separating. Two policy-relevant mean groups were found: one group that particularly disliked impairments to independence was dominated by females living alone (typically widows). Males who live alone (often widowers) did not display a preference for independence, but instead showed a strong aversion to social isolation, as did older people (of either sex) who lived with a spouse. Approximately 6–10% of respondents can be classified into a third group that often misunderstood the task. Having a qualification of any type and higher quality of life was associated with smaller random component variances. This illustrates how better understanding of random utility theory enables richer inferences to be drawn from discrete choice experiments.

Journal article

A panel multinomial logit analysis of elderly living arrangements: evidence from aging in Manitoba longitudinal data, Canada

Authors:
SARMA Sisira, SIMPSON Wally
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(12), December 2007, pp.2539-2552.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Utilizing a unique longitudinal survey linked with home care use data, this paper analyzes the determinants of elderly living arrangements in Manitoba, Canada using a random effects multinomial logit model that accounts for unobserved individual heterogeneity. Because current home ownership is potentially endogenous in a living arrangements choice model, prior home ownership as an instrument is used as an instrument. Prior home care use is also used as an instrument for home care and use a random coefficient framework to account for unobserved health status. After controlling for relevant socio-demographic factors and accounting for unobserved individual heterogeneity, it was found that home care and home ownership reduce the probability of living in a nursing home. Consistent with previous studies, age was also found to be a strong predictor of nursing home entry. Married people, those who have lived longer in the same community, and those who are healthy are more likely to live independently and less likely to be institutionalized or to cohabit with individuals other than their spouse.

Book Full text available online for free

Statistics Release: care homes, Scotland September 2004

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. National Statistics
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Statistics Release: Care homes, Scotland March 2004

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. National Statistics
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

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