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Journal article

Job satisfaction among gerontological social workers in Ontario, Canada

Authors:
SIMONS Kelsey, AN Sofiya
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(6), 2015, pp.547-571.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Little is known about job satisfaction among Canada’s social work workforce in ageing, although social workers remain a key component of interdisciplinary care in health and social service settings. This study begins to address this gap in knowledge by examining individual, interpersonal, and job-design factors influencing the job satisfaction of gerontological social workers in Ontario. Data were collected via two online surveys with a sample drawn from the Ontario Association of Social Workers’ membership list (N = 104). A multiple regression model explained 37% of the variance in job satisfaction, F = 5.47[10, 93], p < .001). Three independent variables were significant (positive affect, β = .21; promotional chances, β = .21; and client acuity, β = −.18). The results suggest the importance of promoting strategies for enhancing job satisfaction, advancing promotional opportunities for social work clinicians, and providing educational and clinical supports to clinicians. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Gerontological social work: reflections on its role, purpose and value

Authors:
RAY Mo, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 45(4), 2015, pp.1296-1312.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Over the last twenty years, successive welfare policies have undermined gerontological social work as a specialist area of social work practice. The UK's ageing population offers an opportunity for gerontological social work to rebuild itself. Increasing numbers of older people with long-term conditions, significant growth in the population of family carers and enhanced community-based living for people with long-term needs combine to reposition social work as, potentially, playing a crucial role in the achievement of key policy goals. The particular skill and knowledge set of social workers uniquely equips them to manage the intersection of issues that currently challenge health and welfare services: complex needs, risk, transitions, end of life, carer stress and frailty. That older service users value the approach, input and expertise of social workers and that social workers have greater capacity to deliver sustainable support are also relevant. For gerontological social work to have a future, not only is it required to reclaim its specialist role, but it must re-establish its commitment to social justice, invest in building an evidence base of effectiveness and embed ageing-related teaching in the social work curriculum. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social workers as research psychotherapists in an investigation of cognitive–behavioral therapy among rural older adults

Authors:
SHAH Avani, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work Research, 37(2), 2013, pp.137-145.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Reports on the treatment fidelity of in-home cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered by a sample of clinically trained, master's-level social workers to a group of primarily rural, medically frail older adults in the United States as part of the Project to Enhance Aged Rural Living (PEARL) clinical trial. The social workers in this study received brief didactic and experiential CBT training. Audiotaped sessions were randomly selected and evaluated by independent reviewers. Results showed that the social workers adequately delivered CBT as measured by the Cognitive Therapy Scale. Older adult participants also evidenced pre- posttreatment improvements, suggesting that the social workers' delivery of CBT facilitated improvement. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Gerontological social workers' perceived efficacy for influencing client outcomes

Authors:
BONIFAS Robin, GAMMONLEY Denise, SIMONS Kelsey
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 55(6), August 2012, pp.519-536.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Health and social service delivery are increasingly under political and financial stress due to economic recession, state budget crises, and an ageing population. Using a sample of 269 practitioners from the 2004 National Study of Licensed Social Workers, this study used a quality assurance structure-process-outcome model to investigate factors at the practitioner, workplace, and service delivery levels that influence the perceived efficacy of licensed gerontological social workers to affect client outcomes in the context of a highly challenging health care environment. A regression model accounted for 33.9% of the variance in perceived efficacy with 3 aspects of service delivery satisfaction having significant effects: ability to address complex/chronic care, to influence the design of services, and to help clients navigate the system. Implications for practice are discussed.

Journal article

Combating Alzheimer's disease: immediate concerns and implications for social workers

Authors:
SINHA Debotosh Sinah, DEY Namita
Journal article citation:
Indian Journal of Social Work, 67(4), October 2006, pp.410-422.
Publisher:
Tata Institute of Social Sciences

This article attempts to discuss exactly what Alzheimer's disease is, its causes, the extent of the problem, diagnosis and prognosis, and treatment. The different stages of the disease, role of the caregivers, and the personal and emotional stress they face is also covered. The role of professional social workers are also highlighted.

Book Full text available online for free

Effective social work with older people

Authors:
KERR Brian, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive. Social Research
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
4p.

Older people do not require social work support simply because of their age. They are not an homogenous group with a single set of needs. This study has highlighted the potential limitations of categorising older people as a separate service user group, as if different from other adults. Many people come to social workers’ attention for the first time following the onset of illness or frailty in old age. Others may have experienced difficulties during adult life which are exacerbated, or combine with adverse circumstances, as they grow older. As part of the 21st Century Social Work Review, the Scottish Executive asked the Social Work Research Centre at the University of Stirling to review the evidence base for effective social work with older people. This short piece of work (conducted during July and August 2005) involved a review of various key texts and recent research.

Journal article

Being a social worker in homes for the aged: the real, the ideal, and the gaps between

Authors:
KOREN Chaya, DORON Israel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 44(3/4), 2005, pp.95-114.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Various theoretical research studies, both academic and professional, have considered the important role social work plays in institutional settings. However, worldwide, very little empirical research has been conducted to examine how social work actually functions in homes for the aged. The study considered here helps to address this, by describing three key aspects of this issue: (1) the function social workers in homes for the aged in Israel actually fulfill (their “real” function); (2) the role that these social workers think that they should be fulfilling (their “ideal” function); and (3) the gap that separates “the real” (what social workers actually do) from “the ideal” (what social workers feel they should be doing). The study's research findings show not only that a gap exists, but also its essence. In the case of both the real roles social workers play in homes for the aged and what they perceive to be the ideal roles they should play, as well as in the case of the gap between the two, “paternalistic” activities were emphasized far more than “empowering” activities, which advocate or promote autonomy. The data obtained outlines possible future research directions, identified while attempting to understand the factors that contribute to the current reality of care in homes for the aged.

Book Full text available online for free

National minimum information standards for older people

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Health Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
40p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

The age-old problem, recognised at last

Author:
PENHALE Bridget
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, October 1994, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

After years of being ignored as a social concern, elder abuse has been increasingly recognised this decade. Puts a social work perspective on recent developments in this sensitive area of work.

Journal article Full text available online for free

What can we do about elder abuse?

Authors:
BULMER Joan, CRAIG Yvonne, WILKINSON Gill
Journal article citation:
Elders the Journal of Care and Practice, 3(2), May 1994, pp.14-17.

Describes a training programme at Kingston's SSD to raise social workers awareness of elder abuse.

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