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Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of 1997/98 'Keep Warm This Winter' campaign

Authors:
ANDERSON Simon, SAWYER Becki
Publisher:
The Scottish Office Central Research Unit
Publication year:
1999
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Systematic searching on the AgeInfo database

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, TAYLOR Brian J., et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
London

AgeInfo and six other databases relevant to social work were searched in order to identify relevant published studies on a specific question regarding decisions about admission of older people to homes in the community. The search was confined to research or reviews of research published in English-language, peer reviewed journals between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2003. The outcome of the searches were compared in terms of sensitivity, precision and the number of relevant articles that were unique to a particular database.  AgeInfo was found to be  a professional database with a range of useful facilities. While not in the top league with Medline, Cinahl or PsycINFO in terms of facilities or size, it is of a comparable standard to other databases used in this study.

Book Full text available online for free

Financial abuse and scams: guidance for councillors, directors, managers and social work practitioners

Author:
ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
Publisher:
Association of Directors of Adult Social Services
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
14
Place of publication:
London

This guide gives some key information on the effects of scams on the continued health and wellbeing of individuals and it is aimed at those working in the adult social care sector. Each year scams cause approximately between £5 and £10 billion worth of detriment to UK consumers. Victims of scams, specifically the elderly and consumers made vulnerable by their circumstances, experience deteriorating health, independence and loss of self-confidence. These give rise to additional financial costs on the health and social care sector which could be prevented through earlier intervention and protection. The inevitable consequences of being a victim are also far more costly in terms of deteriorating health than with pure financial loss. An ageing population, reduced cognitive function in older people and social isolation further exacerbate the risk and impact of financial abuse and scams. The document provides essential advice and tips, designed to help consider responses to the risks of financial abuse associated with scams. They are not exhaustive but suggest areas of specific focus, and comprise: top tips for Councillors; top tips for Safeguarding Adults Boards; top tips for Health & Wellbeing Boards; and top tips for Social Care Practitioners. Three illustrative case studies are included. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Reclaiming social work with adults

Author:
JONES Ray
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, May 2017, pp.17-18.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

The author looks at the role of adult social work and the increasing contribution it can make at a time of an ageing population.

Journal article

Gerontological social work: reflections on its role, purpose and value

Authors:
RAY Mo, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 45(4), 2015, pp.1296-1312.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Over the last twenty years, successive welfare policies have undermined gerontological social work as a specialist area of social work practice. The UK's ageing population offers an opportunity for gerontological social work to rebuild itself. Increasing numbers of older people with long-term conditions, significant growth in the population of family carers and enhanced community-based living for people with long-term needs combine to reposition social work as, potentially, playing a crucial role in the achievement of key policy goals. The particular skill and knowledge set of social workers uniquely equips them to manage the intersection of issues that currently challenge health and welfare services: complex needs, risk, transitions, end of life, carer stress and frailty. That older service users value the approach, input and expertise of social workers and that social workers have greater capacity to deliver sustainable support are also relevant. For gerontological social work to have a future, not only is it required to reclaim its specialist role, but it must re-establish its commitment to social justice, invest in building an evidence base of effectiveness and embed ageing-related teaching in the social work curriculum. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Lessons from America

Authors:
SULLIVAN Mary Pat, MILNE Alisoun
Journal article citation:
Social Work Matters (e-Magazine), February 2014, Online only
Publisher:
The College of Social Work

As the population ages, the author argues there is a need to develop gerontologise social work and build the profession's capacity to improve care for older people and their families. The article draws on practice from the United States which demonstrate the effective contribution that social work plays in the care of older people. Details of the John A Hartford Geriatric Social Work Initiative in the United States is provided as a case study of a programme to promote cultural change in social work to ensure it is meeting the needs of an ageing society in terms of social work education, training and competency. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Gerontological social workers' perceived efficacy for influencing client outcomes

Authors:
BONIFAS Robin, GAMMONLEY Denise, SIMONS Kelsey
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 55(6), August 2012, pp.519-536.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Health and social service delivery are increasingly under political and financial stress due to economic recession, state budget crises, and an ageing population. Using a sample of 269 practitioners from the 2004 National Study of Licensed Social Workers, this study used a quality assurance structure-process-outcome model to investigate factors at the practitioner, workplace, and service delivery levels that influence the perceived efficacy of licensed gerontological social workers to affect client outcomes in the context of a highly challenging health care environment. A regression model accounted for 33.9% of the variance in perceived efficacy with 3 aspects of service delivery satisfaction having significant effects: ability to address complex/chronic care, to influence the design of services, and to help clients navigate the system. Implications for practice are discussed.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Social work and aging: the challenges for evidence-based practice

Authors:
MCCALLION Philip, FERRETTI Lisa A.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(1), Spring 2010, pp.66-71. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

There has been growing interest among social workers in evidence that would support practices that address the emotional, psychological, and social aspects of aging, illness, and care giving. To move an evidence-based intervention from research to day-to-day social work practice is difficult. There have been achievements in using evidence-based, aging-focused social work practice. Three areas are highlighted: psychosocial; case/care management; and multi-modal interventions. Social work services addressing aging and care giving needs would benefit from greater access to evidence-based practices. While some of those evidence-based practices are already available, there are efforts to build such evidence, and there is a readiness to consider how practices shown to be effective in some situations may be applied to other problems and other populations. However, evidence-based practice in social work has tended to be narrowly focused on psychosocial issues when its interests are much broader and the changes needed in the lives of clients often involve environmental, public policy, and health system concerns. Engagement in the 'sciences' of local implementation and translation is needed to supplement more traditional research efforts.

Journal article

Social work in the development of institutional care for older people in Slovenia

Author:
MALI Jana
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 13(4), December 2010, pp.545-559.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Drawing on the author's doctoral thesis, this paper discusses the role and significance of social work in the development of institutional care for older people in Slovenia. The study involved development of a measurement instrument to identify differences between socially and medically oriented institutions. The paper describes a shift in the development of Slovenian homes for older people from medical to social orientation, influenced by social work, and notes that in socially oriented homes a different model of social work is applied than in the medically oriented homes, with the difference lying in social work methods as well as in the roles of the social worker in different areas of work with the residents, relatives and staff. It discusses the factors influencing the orientation of homes, arguing that the successful and changed practice of social work in particular with people with dementia could positively influence other fields of work, change how all residents in homes are treated, and contribute to the social orientation of homes for older people.

Journal article

The discretion and power of street-level bureaucrats: an example from Swedish municipal eldercare

Authors:
DUNER Anna, NORDSTROM Monica
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 9(4), December 2006, pp.425-444.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This paper focuses on discretion in the frontline practice of social work with elderly people in Sweden. The aim is to describe and analyse how care managers in municipal eldercare use discretion and power in needs assessment and decision-making. Emanating from Lipsky's concept of discretion, we identify the conditions of decision-making, which along with the concepts of structural power and intentional power constitute the theoretical framework of this analysis. Eight care managers from four Swedish municipalities were observed and interviewed. The researchers carried out 38 observations and nine in-depth interviews. The analysis led to the identification of four techniques in the decision-making process of care managers: reject, execute, transform needs and control. The consequences of these practices are discussed at the end of the paper.

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