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Book

Why the sudden interest in ageing?: inaugural lecture, 13th November 1989, King's College

Author:
TINKER Anthea
Publisher:
King's College
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
28p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Discusses the growing interest in ageing; suggests why this has happened and why it is likely to increase; and draws conclusions about this interest.

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Home care across Europe: current structure and future challenges

Editors:
GENET Nadine, ed.
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
156p.
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

Currently, for every person over the age of 65 in the European Union, there are four people of working age. But by 2050 there will only be two. Demand for long-term care, of which home care forms a significant part, will inevitably increase in the decades to come. Despite the importance of the issue, however, up-to-date and comparative information on home care in Europe is lacking. This report attempts to fill some of that gap by examining current European policy on home care services and strategies. It examines a wide range of topics including the links between social services and health-care systems, the prevailing funding mechanisms, how service providers are paid, the impact of governmental regulation, and the complex roles played by informal caregivers. Drawing on a set of Europe-wide case studies, the report provides comparable descriptive information on many aspects of the organisation, financing and provision of home care across the continent. The report is designed to help frame the coming debate about how best to serve elderly citizens as European populations age.

Journal article

The marketisation of care: rationales and consequences in Nordic and liberal care regimes

Authors:
BRENNAN Deborah, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of European Social Policy, 22(4), 2012, pp.377-391.
Publisher:
Sage

The use of markets and market mechanisms to deliver care is one of the most significant and contentious ways in which welfare states have been transformed. This article examines debates and policies concerning the marketisation of eldercare and childcare in Sweden, England and Australia. It shows how market discourses and practices intersect with, reinforce or challenge traditions and existing policies and examines whether care markets deliver user empowerment and greater efficiency. Markets for eldercare and childcare have developed in uneven and context specific ways with varying consequences. Both politics and policy history help to shape market outcomes.

Journal article

Variations in structures, processes and outcomes of community mental health teams for older people: a systematic review of the literature

Authors:
ABENDSTERN M., et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 16(7), September 2012, pp.861-873.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Specialist community mental health teams (CMHTs) are central to the provision of comprehensive services for older people with mental ill health. Recent guidance documents suggest a core set of attributes that such teams should encompass. This literature review explored existing evidence regarding the structures and processes of CMHTs for older people and to evaluate evidence linking approaches to effectiveness. Searches were limited to the UK for descriptions of organisation and practice. Forty-five studies met inclusion criteria of which seven provided comparative outcome data. Limited evidence was found regarding the effectiveness of many of the core attributes recommended in policy directives although their presence was reported in much of the literature. The contrast between presentation and evaluation of attributes is stark. Whilst some gaps can be filled from related fields, further research is required to evaluate the impact of team design on service user outcomes in order to inform future guidance.

Book Full text available online for free

A fair budget: a discussion paper exploring the role of the RAS in the development of self-directed support

Authors:
DUFFY Simon, ETHERINGTON Keith
Publisher:
Centre for Welfare Reform
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
Sheffield

This discussion paper describes a way forward for developing Resource Allocation Systems (RAS) in Scotland as an essential component of a sustainable system of self-directed support. It argues that, rather than fixate on one model or system, it is better to begin a period of genuine innovation and exploration in partnership with disabled people and families. The report suggests that the English experience of providing personal budgets provides some important Lessons for Scotland, but that there is also a danger of creating an unduly bureaucratic system that does not trust disabled people or professionals. The report offers seven principles to describe how an effective RAS should work, and an empirical process to measure the success of emerging models.

Journal article

Long-term care for older people and EU Law: the position in England and Scotland

Authors:
HERVEY Tamara, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 34(1), March 2012, pp.105-124.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The implications of EU law for UK healthcare provision have been tracked by the literature, and covered in EU legislation. However, long-term care for older people involves not only healthcare but also social care. This article examined to what extent, if at all, is the current legal position on long-term care for older people in England and Scotland potentially inconsistent with the UK's obligations in EU law? Drawing on empirical data gathered in early 2010 for a European Commission report, this article considers in detail how EU law might apply to the social care aspects of long-term care for older people in England and Scotland. It concludes that EU law is an important element of the long-term care policy context. Implications for practice are discussed.

Book Full text available online for free

A better fit? Creating housing choices fit for an ageing population

Author:
HUGHES Nicola
Publisher:
Shelter
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
32p.
Place of publication:
London

England’s population is ageing, with 1 in 3 people projected to be aged 55 and over by 2030. Older people are a diverse group, ranging from economically powerful ‘baby boomers’ to over-85s with high care and support needs. In response to this demographic shift, policies on the availability and suitability of housing for older people are required. Providing the right kinds of accommodation for older people, in the right places, would lead to positive well-being and health outcomes for them, and would help to create movement in the housing market by freeing up family sized homes. This report considers how to promote a greater supply of housing for older people and how to facilitate home moves for those who choose to move. It focuses mainly on homeowners and the private housing market. The report was informed by: a market assessment of housing options for older people; a survey of respondents aged 55 and over; secondary analysis of existing literature and data sources; and informal consultation with sector stakeholders. After considering the current market for older people’s housing and older people’s attitudes towards housing, the report goes on to argue the benefits of improving the housing offer for older people, why developers and planners should pay attention to this market, and how to overcome some of the barriers to providing better housing options for older people.

Journal article

Comparative political economy of long-term care for elderly people: political logic of universalistic social care policy development

Author:
HIEDA Takeshi
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 46(3), June 2012, pp.258-279.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Despite there being common socio-demographic pressures across industrialised countries, the public elder care programmes tend to vary. This study explored the causal relationship between political institutions and public long-term care programmes. It examined time-series and cross-section data of advanced democracies, from 1980 until 2001. It argued that countries with fragmented party systems have difficulties in developing universalistic public elder care programmes, whereas countries with party-vote-oriented electoral systems and cohesive party systems are likely to develop better elder care programmes. For whilst the former types of political institutions prioritise patronage-based, particularistic benefits, the latter types encourage political actors to appeal to broader constituencies through universalistic welfare programmes. The empirical results suggest that politicians' reliance on personal votes obstruct the expansion of public spending for elder care.

Book Full text available online for free

Reshaping care for older people: a programme for change 2011-2021

Authors:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Government, CONVENTION OF SCOTTISH LOCAL AUTHORITIES
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
34p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Providing high quality care and support for older people is a fundamental principle of social justice and is an important hallmark of a caring and compassionate society. Demographic changes coupled with a decade of difficult public finances means this is one of the 3 biggest challenges facing Scotland – alongside economic recovery and climate change. This document sets out the Scottish vision and immediate actions for reshaping the care and support of older people. It has been co-produced through an extensive period of development and engagement with the people of Scotland and with political, organisational and community interests at both local and national levels. The programme presented provides a framework, built on consensus across all sectors and interests, to address the challenges of supporting and caring for Scotland’s growing older population into the next decade and beyond. This document will be updated to ensure it operates as a key driver for Reshaping Care.

Book Full text available online for free

An evidence base for the delivery of adult services

Author:
PETCH Alison
Publisher:
Association of Directors of Adult Social Services
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
60p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This independent evidence review was commissioned by the Association of Directors of Social Work to inform current debates on the future delivery of adult services. It sought to ground such debate in a firm understanding of the conclusions that can be drawn from initiatives evaluated both within the UK and elsewhere, ensuring that any future developments can be based on a clear understanding of the likely impact. The debate is motivated by the aspiration to establish the optimum conditions for the provision of support to the 650,000 people in Scotland who have contact with social services. Key conclusions highlight the need to ensure the most effective configuration for the delivery of adult health and social care is imperative given the current financial and demographic challenges. It has a high profile within the current policy context, exemplified by the Reshaping Care for Older People agenda. Social services for adults have delivered major achievements over the last two decades. There have been major shifts in the models of support from dependency and institutionalisation to greater choice and control by the individual. At the same time there has been recognition of key areas such as the needs of family carers and the demands of dementia that were previously invisible. The large majority of those receiving care and support express high levels of satisfaction.

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