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Book

Young technologies in old hands: an international view on senior citizen's utilization of ICT

Editors:
JAEGER Birgit, (ed.)
Publisher:
DJOF Publishing
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
247p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

The field of Senior Citizens and information and communication technology (ICT) is a rather new field and there is not much published in this area yet. For many years the relationship between seniors and ICT has mainly been discussed in terms of how technology can be used to compensate for the impairments many old people have to face. This volume,  takes another point of departure. First of all, Senior Citizens are not a homogeneous group where all people over a certain age are impaired, and in the need of help. Second, when the relationship between Senior Citizens and ICT is actually discussed, it is very often as a discussion of how helpers of the old people (nurses, home helpers, physicians and the like) can make use of ICT. Here, the Senior Citizens themselves can utilize ICT. This change of the scope introduces a new theme into the debate raising new questions, in particular the question of how a digital divide, in which the Senior Citizens are excluded from the information society, can be reduced. In this volume, older ICT users are identified just as several activities, provided by governments, non-profit organizations, and other actors, are analysed. Most of these activities are engaged in finding solutions to how the seniors learn to use the technology, and in improving their everyday life enhancing its quality.

Journal article

How to make a complaint

Author:
EASTERBROOK Lorna
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 7(4), December 2003, pp.34-37.
Publisher:
Emerald

Sets out practical tips for older people when making a complaint.

Book Full text available online for free

Support at home: views of older people about their needs and access to services: 1999

Author:
MACDONALD Charlotte
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
1999
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Listen and learn

Authors:
THORNTON Patricia, TOZER Rosemary
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 27.7.95, 1995, pp.20-21.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Argues that many elderly people have seized the opportunities brought by the community care reforms to influence change, but there is still a long way to go.

Journal article

Supporting role

Author:
EVANS Gordon
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 2.3.94, 1994, pp.70-71.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Explains how independent advocates can enhance communication between professionals and the older people they are caring for.

Journal article

Case management: predicting activity patterns

Author:
DOUVILLE M. Lynn
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 20(3/4), 1993, pp.43-55.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Reports a study in Louisiana, USA, which provides a foundation for the development of case management practice models. The study analyzes the combined effects of client, worker and organizational variables on case management activity patterns. Social work roles in case management practice are also examined.

Book

A summary of the monitoring of time trends in the Kent community care scheme: April 1988

Author:
CHESTERMAN John
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
18p., tables.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

A longitudinal overview of the Kent County Council Community Care Scheme for the elderly is summarised by means of the database obtained from systematic monitoring using fieldwork records.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Interviewing elderly people : some problems and challenges

Authors:
MacPHERSON I., et al
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 5(2), 1988, pp.13-18.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

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Digital Media Full text available online for free

Dignity in care: choice and control

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
13 minutes 30 seconds
Place of publication:
London

Everyone has the right to make choices about how they live and how their support is provided. This film shows how people with care and support needs can be supported to have choice and control. Three examples shown are owning a budgerigar; deciding between mince with dumplings or a roast chicken dinner; and going shopping. The young men with learning disabilities who draw up their preferred shopping list travel to town unsupported, buy the food, come back and cook it and then eat it. It's important to take time to understand and know the person, their previous lives and past achievements, and to support people to develop things like ‘life story books'. If you treat people as equals, you can make sure they remain in control of what happens to them. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Access to long-term care: perceptions and experiences of older Dutch people

Authors:
SCHIPPER Lisette, et al
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 16(2), 2015, pp.83-93.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Despite the current focus on demand-based care, little is known about what clients consider important when they have a request for formal long-term care services. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach: Questions about the access process to care services were added to the “Senior Barometer”, a Dutch web-based questionnaire that assesses the opinion of older people about different aspects in life. The questionnaire surveyed both people who already requested care services (“users”), and people that did not (“future clients”). Findings: The results show a significant difference in what people expect to be the first step from what users actually did, when requesting formal care services. In addition, there was a significant difference on how “users” and “future clients” rated several access service aspects. Research limitations/implications:The results give valuable information on how both “users” and “future clients” value the access process. The findings also provide valuable input for organisations providing long-term care for older clients about the important issues that have to be considered when organising the access process. Originality/value: This study shows what older people in the Netherlands find important during the access process to care and this has not been explored before. The difference between what “users” and “future clients” find of importance in the care access process suggests that it is difficult for people to foresee what will be important once the need for care arrives, or where they will turn to with a request for care services. (Edited publisher abstract)

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