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Book Full text available online for free

Supporting people at the start of their care home journey: a warm welcome

Author:
WALES. Welsh Government
Publisher:
Welsh Government
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This document provides suggestions on how people who work in a care home can provide a welcome pack for their residents. It aims to help care home staff provide clear information for people covering the issues that matter to them most, and explaining what they can expect from life in a care home. Suggestions for areas to cover include: respecting cultural identity and diversity, communication, social interaction, hobbies and interests; involving family and the local community; practical arrangements for day-to-day living; health care; costs; and making a complaint. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Utilization of the seniors falls investigation methodology to identify system-wide causes of falls in community-dwelling seniors

Authors:
ZECEVIC Aleksandra A., et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 49(5), October 2009, pp.685-696.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The aim of this study was to look at safety deficiencies found during fifteen investigations of falls among older people living in a naturally occurring retirement community in Ontario. Rather than viewing each case study from the more traditional person-centred perspective, a six step systems approach, the Senior Falls Investigation Methodology (SFIM), adapted from a technique commonly used for industrial or transportation accidents, was developed by the authors to identify common patterns of safety deficiencies and causes. The falls were found to be the result of latently unsafe conditions, decisions and actions over a diverse set off circumstances, which if not identified and removed could cause falls for other older people in the future. Compelling evidence was generated that causes of falling are systemic and develop over time and are best assessed by a systems approach such as SFIM which will expand the focus away from the individual faller and towards the multi-layered and supervisory causes. This will lead to improved prevention and management programs. While this study concentrated on older people living at home, the SFIM technique shows potential for use in hospitals and residential homes also.

Journal article

Comparison of the characteristics of homes for older people in Slovenia with Goffman's concept of the total institution

Author:
MALI Jana
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 11(4), 2008, pp.431-443.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The past concepts of life and work in homes for older people in Slovenia are no longer adequate to meet the needs, wishes and requirements of their current users. One of the basic premises, relying on Goffman's concept of the total institution, is that the first and foremost characteristic of homes for older people is that they are institutions. The theoretical starting point, namely that Goffman's concept of the total institution is ideal-typical, was corroborated by an investigation of the presence of elements of the total institution in Slovenian homes for older people, proving that not all features of the total institution can be found in any chosen empirical selection of institutions, with the data showing that those characteristics which are present do not exist in the ideal, that is in the most pronounced form. The homes' users are given consideration, their personnel are adapting to their needs and requirements, even though this occurs within the functioning of an institution whose aims, i.e. to care for a large number of people living in one place, make life in such an institution subordinated to rules, along with the bureaucratisation and routinisation of services.

Journal article Full text available online for free

How to keep residents active

Author:
SALE Anabel Unity
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.12.08, 2008, pp.30-31.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Ashley House care home in Borden, Hampshire provides a wide range of activities for residents - both formally structured events and spontaneous activities. This article reports on their practice and the benefits for residents.

Journal article

Definition and classification of assisted living

Authors:
ZIMMERMAN Sheryl, SLOANE Philip D.
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 47(3), December 2007, pp.33-39.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The purpose of this article is to discuss the benefits and limitations of, and considerations in, developing a typology of assisted living (AL). The authors conducted a review and comparison of nine AL typologies drawn from the literature. Typologies addressed matters related to the structure, process, population, and philosophy of AL to varying degrees. A lack of available data and different sampling frames hindered attempts to quantitatively compare the typologies. Typologies are potentially useful for consumers, practitioners, policy makers, and researchers. It is advisable to identify state-based typologies and then empirically determine types that have national representation. Stakeholders should consider the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and allow any resulting typology to anticipate ongoing evolution in the field of AL.

Journal article

'Our real challenge is to deliver more for less'

Author:
NACIF Ana Paula
Journal article citation:
Local Government Chronicle, 4.10.07, 2007, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Emap Business

Despite its excellent performance ratings, Buckinghamshire County Council had issues with resident dissatisfaction. This article reports on its Transformation project, set up to deliver better and cheaper services, which brought together a group of local over-50S to ask them what they really wanted.

Journal article

My Home Life: a new vision for care home practice

Authors:
OWEN Tom, MEYER Julienne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 15(5), September 2007, pp.28-30.
Publisher:
Hawker

The My Home Life programme aims to improve the quality of life for everyone involved in care homes - residents, staff and visitors. This article outlines the vision of My Home Life and discusses the eight best practice themes identified: managing transitions; maintaining identity; creating community; sharing decision-making; improving health and healthcare; supporting good end-of-life care; keeping workforce fit for purpose; and promoting positive culture.

Journal article

The state of chronic pain in the elderly

Author:
MURPHY Katherine
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 11(2), June 2007, pp.32-34.
Publisher:
Emerald

The author looks at the findings of the Patient's Association survey, which sought to examine how care home residents' pain is managed.

Journal article

Calling the question of "possible dying" among nursing home residents: triggers, barriers, and facilitators

Author:
BERN-KLUG Mercedes
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, 2(3), 2006, pp.61-85.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

Glaser and Strauss reported decades ago that in order for a person to be treated as dying, he/she must be defined as dying. Defining nursing home residents as "dying" can be complicated because most residents are in advanced old age with multiple chronic conditions. Using a social construction theoretical framework, this study looks at the step before the declaration of dying, that is, the consideration of the possibility of dying. This qualitative study is a secondary analysis of prospective data collected during 16 months of fieldwork on behalf of 45 nursing home residents whose health was considered declining. The purpose of this paper is to build understanding about the social construction of "possible dying" by reporting triggers that can call the question of possible dying and stimulate a discussion about the nursing home resident's status, prognosis, care options, and preferences. These triggers include: Health status decline; non-compliance with diet or medications; available medical interventions not being well suited for the residents; and family consideration of an out-of-town trip. The paper also reports barriers (family, staff, and disease process) and facilitators to calling the question of possible dying, including families having a sense of treatments they would like to avoid and having the opportunity to talk through options. Findings are discussed in light of basic assumptions of social construction. Implications for social workers include helping residents, families, and staff anticipate and address the possibility of dying, and to reflect these discussion in care plans, as well as the need to be available to help residents and family members with psychosocial issues related to living and dying in the nursing home setting, including the profound issues that can be provoked or exacerbated by resident health status decline and possible dying. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article Full text available online for free

Let people loose

Author:
LLOYD Mark
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.10.06, 2006, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article provides a comparison of older care in Finland and the UK, based on a study visit by staff from Kent Community Housing Trust to the combined health and social services department in the Espoo region. The article concentrates on lessons to be learned for older care – particularly residential – in the UK. It focuses on the benefits of nursing and social care combined services, contrasting Finland’s guiding principle that “regulation stifles the soul” in older care, with the UK approach of overregulation.

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