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Journal article

Research

Author:
BOOTH Tim
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 11.3.93, 1993, p.26.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at research into elderly people leaving home, with the aim of gaining understanding of how they feel about entering residential care.

Book

Reasons for admission to part 3 residential homes: a summary of the research evidence

Author:
BOOTH Tim
Publisher:
National Council of Domiciliary Care Services
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
34p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Norwich
Book

Residential care for elderly people

Author:
GILL Peter
Publisher:
University of East Anglia
Publication year:
1988
Pagination:
43p., diags., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Norwich
Book

The elderly and residential care: Australian lessons for Britain

Author:
PARKER R.A
Publisher:
Gower
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
128p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Aldershot
Book

The use of residential care for the elderly

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Scottish Office. Scottish Education Department. Social Work Services Group
Publisher:
Great Britain. Scottish Office. Scottish Education Department. Social Work Servi
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
67p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book

Residential care: is it for me?; a book to help all older people considering moving into a residential home

Author:
BLAND Rosemary
Publisher:
HMSO
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
47p., list of organisations.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

A practical guide suggesting all the questions that should be asked before choosing a home.

Journal article

Elderly people's care in Germany

Author:
BROOKE-ROSS R.
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 21(3), 1987, pp.244-251.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

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Journal article Full text available online for free

Imagined bodies: architects and their constructions of later life

Authors:
BUSE Christina E., et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 37(7), 2017, pp.1435-1457.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article comprises a sociological analysis of how architects imagine the ageing body when designing residential care homes for later life and the extent to which they engage empathetically with users. Drawing on interviews with architectural professionals based in the United Kingdom, the authors offer insight into the ways in which architects envisage the bodies of those who they anticipate will populate their buildings. Deploying the notions of ‘body work’ and ‘the body multiple’, this analysis reveals how architects imagined a variety of bodies in nuanced ways. These imagined bodies emerge as they talked through the practicalities of the design process. Moreover, their conceptions of bodies were also permeated by prevailing ideologies of caring: although the authors found that they sought to resist dominant discourses of ageing, they nevertheless reproduced these discourses. Architects’ constructions of bodies are complicated by the collaborative nature of the design process, where the authors' find an incessant juggling between the competing demands of multiple stakeholders, each of whom anticipate other imagined bodies and seek to shape the design of buildings to meet requirements. The findings extend a nascent sociological literature on architecture and social care by revealing how architects participate in the shaping of care for later life as ‘body workers’, but also how their empathic aspirations can be muted by other imperatives driving the marketisation of care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Exploring the personal and environmental factors related to length of stay in assisted living

Author:
FIELDS Noelle L.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 59(3), 2016, pp.205-221.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study explored to what extent personal and environmental factors, as defined by the ecological model of aging, help us to understand length of stay in assisted living (AL). A convenience sample (N = 218) of administrative records of AL residents admitted between the years 2006 and 2011 was collected and included AL residents' demographic and healthcare information as well as dates of admission and discharge. Cox regression was used to determine which personal and environmental factors influenced length of stay in three AL programs. Number of medical diagnoses, level of care score, and facility were found to be significant predictors of length of stay. The analyses identified a median survival time of 32 months as well as critical periods for discharge from AL. Implications for future research and social work practice are presented. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Review of care products: key messages

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Department of Health
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

The Department of Health invited representatives of the financial services industry to conduct a review of the market of products to fund care. These reports have identified opportunities for development of financial care products and the problems they might face. This short report presents key messages from the financial services industry, which briefly outlines the types of plans those entering care (mainly aged 75+), the ‘semi-retired’, and those of working age should make. It suggests the sorts of “products” that could help with care costs, e.g. Equity Release; and that certain conditions are also needed to create consumer demand for such products to make provision for care, for example helping people to access good financial advice. The review was supported by 3 industry-led working groups that looked a: consumers and the marketplace, housing and equity, and pensions and insurance. (Edited publisher abstract)

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