Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 1489

Book

When we are old and gray : report of the committee on the living conditions of elderly people in the community

Author:
LIASON COMMITTEE FOR SOCIAL WORKERS IN THE EUROPIAN COMMUNITY
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers
Publication year:
1983
Pagination:
29p.
Place of publication:
Birmingham
Book Full text available online for free

Nutritional care and older people

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

This summary examines nutritional care in relation to older people and is based on the nutritional care and mealtimes section of SCIE's Dignity in Care guide. Three main sections cover: the nature of the problem; the foundations for good nutritional care; and managing nutritional care and mealtimes.

Book Full text available online for free

My home life: quality of life in care homes: a review of the literature

Author:
NATIONAL CARE HOMES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FORUM
Publisher:
Help the Aged
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
192p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

My Home Life is a new initiative aimed at improving the quality of life of those who are living, dying, visiting and working in care homes for older people. This review aims to find existing best practices in care homes and promote care homes as a positive option for older people. The project is working to help improve the quality of life in care home, through the development of a range of resources, events, practice development initiatives and other activities.

Book Full text available online for free

Improving older people's oral health

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. Faculty of Dental Surgery
Publisher:
Royal College of Surgeons. Faculty of Dental Surgery
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

This report raises concerns about the significant impact that poor oral health is having on older people’s general health and quality of life. It makes a number of recommendations to improve oral healthcare for older people in England. They include: that key health and social care professionals should receive training in oral health; for regulators to make standards of oral care part of their assessments of hospitals and care homes; and for Government, health services, local authorities, care providers, regulators and the oral health profession to work together to improve access to dental services for older people. Although primarily applicable to England, a number of the recommendations also relevant for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Examining associations between sexual behaviours and quality of life in older adults

Authors:
FLYNN Taylor-Jane, GOW Alan J.
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 44(5), 2015, pp.823-828.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Background: While sexual behaviours are potentially important for quality of life in older adults, they are under-researched. The current study examined associations between frequency and importance of sexual behaviours and quality of life in older adults. Method: One hundred and thirty-three participants (mean 74 years, SD = 7.1) provided information about the frequency with which they participated in six sexual behaviours and the perceived importance of these: touching/holding hands, embracing/hugging, kissing, mutual stroking, masturbating and intercourse. Participants also completed the WHO Quality of Life scale, providing an overall quality of life score, in addition to the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment. Participants provided information on their marital status, living arrangements and self-reported health. Results: Both the frequency and importance of sexual behaviours were moderately positively correlated with quality of life (r = 0.52 and 0.47, respectively, both P < 0.001). In separate regression analyses, the frequency of sexual behaviours was a significant predictor of quality of life in the social relationships domain (β = 0.225, P < 0.05), and the importance of sexual behaviours was associated with the psychological domain (β = 0.151, P < 0.05), independent of the presence of a spouse/partner and self-reported health. Conclusions: With ageing trends, a broader understanding of the factors that influence quality of life in older adults is increasingly important. The current findings suggest that aspects of sexual behaviour and quality of life were positively associated. Researchers are encouraged to consider aspects of sex and sexuality when exploring determinants of well-being in later life. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Insights into loneliness, older people and wellbeing, 2015

Author:
THOMAS Jennifer
Publisher:
Office for National Statistics
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
Newport

This article focuses on older people's well-being, loneliness and some of the risk factors associated with loneliness such as living alone, housing tenure, marital status, ill health and support networks. The ONS Measuring National Well-being programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation - how the UK as a whole is doing. This analysis shows that older people are more satisfied with life generally and with their social networks and the support they provide. This may be due to having lower expectations due to a cohort effect or more mature perspectives but ultimately they are more content than their younger counterparts. However, the impact of loneliness on well-being is considerable, especially for the oldest old who are most likely to feel lonely and are subject to a high number of risk factors. The paper argues that the UK needs to consider how to minimise some of the impact that risk factors of loneliness has, particularly bereavement, poor health, and housing tenure. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Does life satisfaction predict five-year mortality in community-living older adults?

Authors:
ST. JOHN Philip D., MACKENZIE Corey, MENEC Verena
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 19(4), 2015, pp.363-370.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: Depression and depressive symptoms predict death, but it is less clear if more general measures of life satisfaction (LS) predict death. This study aimed to determine: (1) if LS predicts mortality over a five-year period in community-living older adults; and (2) which aspects of LS predict death. Method: 1751 adults over the age of 65 who were living in the community were sampled from a representative population sampling frame in 1991/1992 and followed five years later. Age, gender, and education were self-reported. An index of multimorbidity and the Older American Resource Survey measured health and functional status, and the Terrible–Delightful Scale assessed overall LS as well as satisfaction with: health, finances, family, friends, housing, recreation, self-esteem, religion, and transportation. Cox proportional hazards models examined the influence of LS on time to death. Results: 417 participants died during the five-year study period. Overall LS and all aspects of LS except finances, religion, and self-esteem predicted death in unadjusted analyses. In fully adjusted analyses, LS with health, housing, and recreation predicted death. Other aspects of LS did not predict death after accounting for functional status and multimorbidity. Conclusion: LS predicted death, but certain aspects of LS are more strongly associated with death. The effect of LS is complex and may be mediated or confounded by health and functional status. It is important to consider different domains of LS when considering the impact of this important emotional indicator on mortality among older adults. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A conceptual framework of the multi-dimensional model of the quality of life in later life

Author:
PARK Seung-Min
Journal article citation:
Social and Public Policy Review, 7(2), 2013, pp.1-22.
Publisher:
University of Plymouth
Place of publication:
Plymouth

There is a plethora of empirical research on the quality of life in later life as global population ageing accelerates. However, some previous research on this subject may have used the concept vaguely or even incorrectly. As a result, this paper aims to conceptually build a framework on the quality of life in later life hereinafter called ‘the multi-dimensional model of the quality of life in later life’. This ultidimensional model consists not only of objective quality of life, including standard of living, social activity, and objective health status, but also subjective quality of life, including life satisfaction, happiness, and subjective health status. To promote further empirical research using the model, this paper suggests a conceptual structural equation model based on previous empirical studies on the significant associations amongst those dimensions. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

An assessment of the relationship between informal caring and quality of life in older community-dwelling adults: more positives than negatives?

Authors:
RATCLIFFE Julie, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(1), 2013, pp.35-46.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study used the Index of Capability (ICECAP-O) instrument to measure the quality of life of a representative sample of the older South Australian population according to carer status. A survey including the ICECAP-O instrument, carer status and several socio-demographic questions was administered in 2009 to 789 individuals aged 65 years or older in their own homes. A total of 671 individuals characterised themselves as a non-carer and 115 individuals characterised themselves as an informal carer. In general, carers exhibited relatively high quality of life as measured by the ICECAP-O, with carers having comparable mean ICECAP-O scores to non-carers in the general population. The results indicated statistically significant variations in overall ICECAP-O scores according to age, with younger participants tending to have slightly higher scores on average. Average ICECAP-O scores were noticeably lower for carers who were separated or divorced and for carers who lived alone. The authors concluded that the provision of informal care may be associated with a positive impact upon quality of life for many caregivers, which may mediate the negative aspects arising from the burden associated with informal care-giving.

Book Full text available online for free

Supported housing for older people in the UK: an evidence review: summary

Authors:
PANNELL Jenny, BLOOD Imogen
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Sheltered housing has changed significantly over the past decade, yet has received little attention from researchers and policy-makers. Changes to funding and benefits for older people's housing and support services need underpinning by robust evidence. This study examines existing evidence about the quality of life offered by sheltered and retirement housing and identifies factors that may improve or reduce quality of life. Eighty publications with material on housing with support and further background publications were included, along with a detailed analysis of 24 academic and resident-led research reports. Key points suggest that: there is limited recent research evidence on the quality of accommodation, services and residents in the UK's 550,000 units of housing with support for older people; this lack of evidence is a cause for concern for residents, providers and commissioners of housing, support and care; and diminishing levels of on-site staffing have affected quality of life for some residents.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts