Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 344

Journal article

Why are some care homes better than others? An empirical study of the factors associated with quality of care for older people in residential homes in Surrey, England

Authors:
GAGE Heather, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 16(6), November 2009, pp.599-609.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Data from inspection reports (2002–2003) of all 258 care homes for older people in one county of England (Surrey) was analysed to explore whether the quality of care could be explained by care home or resident characteristics. The number of inspected standards failed in each home was used as the main indicator of quality of care. Independent variables (for each home) were: size, type, specialist registration, on-site nursing, ownership, year registered, location, maximum fee, vacancies, resident dependency, whether the home took publicly funded residents, care staff qualifications and managerial quality. Quality of care was modelled using a Poisson count maximum likelihood method. It was found that  quality of care (as defined by failures on national standards) was statistically associated with features of care homes and their residents. A higher probability of failing a standard was significantly associated with being a home that: was a for-profit small business; was registered before 2000, accommodated publicly funded residents; and was registered to provide nursing care. Fewer failures were associated with homes that were corporate for-profit; held a specialist registration; charged higher maximum fees. A secondary analysis revealed a stronger model: higher scores on managerial standards correlated with fewer failures on other standards.

Book

The new culture of therapeutic activity with older people

Editors:
PERRIN Tessa, (ed.)
Publisher:
Speechmark
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
236p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bicester

Once viewed as entertainment, activity provision is increasingly being seen as of therapeutic value and an integral part of quality care practice. This change has been so rapid and far-reaching that many staff teams have been left behind, attempting to address new culture requirements with old culture knowledge. This book clarifies and illuminates the changes that have been taking place in the field of activity provision over recent years, and offers a guideline to those who are endeavouring to catch up. Contents include: the difference between old culture and new culture thinking and practice; the new culture from the perspective of the politician, the manager, the care assistant, the activity provider, the researcher, the trainer, and the community worker and the activity charity.

Book Full text available online for free

Losing time: developing mental health services for older people in Wales

Author:
AUDIT COMMISSION
Publisher:
Audit Commission
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
London

The quality of mental health services for older people in Wales varies greatly depending on where they live, and there are severe shortages of specialist care when they can no longer be supported at home. Carers are generally well supported but their needs should be assessed more consistently and staff in residential homes need better training. Report highlights over 30 examples of good practice, but says that this needs to be shared more widely. Calls for more partnership working between health and social care and the introduction of defined minimum standards.

Book

Always to never: a guide to quality assurance for day care providers

Authors:
SHEPHERD Diane, WELLS Jan, WILKIE Claire
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
56p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Guide for providers of day care to older people.

Book

Gold standards: a guide to professional targets for the care of elderly people; a selected bibliography

Author:
AGE CONCERN ENGLAND
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
59p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Quality in social work services

Editors:
BLACK Stewart, GEORGE Carol
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
52p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Stirling

5 seminar papers on quality in social work services in Scotland: what is quality; attempting to promote quality in social work; quality in health care services; quality in services for older people; and one persons experience of quality assurance.

Journal article

Quality assurance in residential care

Author:
MURPHY Elaine
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 7(10), October 1992, pp.695-697.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Identifies the characteristics of institutions where scandals arise; "human care" services could learn from commercial service businesses: outlines the key features designed to achieve success in situations where the provider of services may be quite remote from the centre.

Book Full text available online for free

Putting care right: your guide to choosing a care home

Author:
ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
Publisher:
Alzheimer's Society
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
London

This guide features the essential issues to consider when deciding on a care home for a person with dementia. It lists questions families can put to care home staff and includes blank pages for notes on the places they visit. This guide raises the crucial questions everyone should ask about care homes. It will also help people to understand how to recognise quality care and help them to start demanding the high standards of care that people with dementia deserve. The charity’s survey found a third of people over 55 have experience of looking for care homes, but nationwide more than more than four out of ten people admit they would not know what to look for in a good care home. Skilled staff appear to be more important than a nicely decorated room when it comes to deciding on the quality of residential care. A choice of activities and access to outside space was also rated as important by more than 94 per cent of people.

Book Full text available online for free

Using survey data to measure changes in the quality of home care: analysis of the older people's user experience survey 2006

Authors:
MALLEY Juliette, NETTEN Ann, JONES Karen
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
110p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

The development of the User experience Survey (UES) and the inclusion of the user’s perspective in the Performance Assessment Framework (PAF) were novel and important steps forward in the world of performance assessment and monitoring of social services. Commentators had previously criticised the lack of connectedness between the performance/quality and user involvement agendas and these developments represented real steps forward in meeting this goal. Analysis from the 2003 extension to the UES for older people has demonstrated that user experience measures can usefully discriminate between Local Authorities (LAs). While his new research raises some important questions, this type of approach is clearly an improvement on performance measurement based on processes and inputs. Fifty authorities took part with representation from all Government Office Regions and LA types. Analysis of responses to the compulsory questions and comparison with responses to these questions nationally revealed very similar proportions responding to each category. We can assume from these findings that the sample of authorities is broadly representative of the views of service users across England.

Journal article

Factors associated with higher quality assessment tools in care homes

Authors:
WORDEN Angela, CHALLIS David
Journal article citation:
Journal of Care Services Management, 2(1), October 2007, pp.79-91.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This paper investigates the relationship between the quality of assessment tools used in care homes and the different characteristics of care homes in part of North-West England. Using both single variable comparisons and multivariate analyses there were several home characteristics associated with the use of higher-quality assessment tools. Higher-quality assessment process were associated with homes being larger, part of a group or chain, provision of staff training and run by non-for-profit organisation or local authority. Poorer quality of assessment was associated with inspection reports indicating lower standards of management and staffing and generally poorer quality of the home. The findings raise the question as to whether government initiatives to improve assessment of older people should be extended to care homes, with a need to focus on certain types of home where assessment is less likely to be well developed.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts