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Journal

American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry

Publisher:
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

This Journal contains peer-reviewed articles on the diagnosis and classification of psychiatric disorders of later life, epidemiological and biological correlates of mental health of older adults, and psychopharmacology and other somatic treatments. Coverage on Social Care Online from this journal is limited to relevant systematic reviews only.

Book

Practical psychiatry of old age

Authors:
WATTIS John, CHURCH Michael
Publisher:
Croom Helm
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
195p., diags., bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Journal

International Psychogeriatrics

Publisher:
Cambridge Journals

The journal aims to be the leading peer reviewed journal dealing with the mental health of older people throughout the world in all its aspects. Published quarterly, International Psychogeriatrics features research articles, important editorials, commentaries, book reviews and letters to the editors. Coverage on Social Care Online from this journal is limited to relevant systematic reviews only.

Journal article

Does arm length indicate cognitive and functional reserve?

Authors:
JEONG Seul-Ki, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(5), May 2005, pp.406-412.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aimed to examine whether arm length and height were associated with cognitive and functional abilities. Screening interviews were conducted in 235 community dwelling individuals aged 65 and over. The assessment scales included the Korean version of modified Mini-Mental State Examination (K-mMMSE) for cognition, and the Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (K-IADL) for functional ability. All the participants were examined clinically and a diagnosis of dementia was ascertained. Anthropometric measurements included total arm span and height. Both arm length and height correlated significantly with the cognitive and functional scales. In the multivariate regression models, their associations were significant, independent of age, sex, education, and other variables. Shorter arm length was also significantly associated with dementia; while, height lost significance after an adjustment for the potential confounders. Arm length and height could indicate cognitive and functional ability. Arm length, which was known to be less prone to degenerative processes, might be more stable as an indicator for cognitive and functional reserve capacity than height.

Journal article

Does education moderate neuropsychological impairment in late-life depression?

Authors:
BHALLA Rishi K., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(5), May 2005, pp.413-417.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The increased resistance of better-educated individuals to the cognitive effects of neuropathology has been conceptualized as reflecting brain reserve. This study examined whether educational level influences the degree of neuropsychological impairment associated with late-life depression. The neuropsychological performances of 115 older depressed patients and of 44 comparison subjects of similar age and education were compared as a function of educational level. While depressed patients performed worse than comparison subjects on all the measures, the severity of this impairment (with respect to comparison subjects) did not differ with the educational level of the patients. Brain reserve, as indexed by the patients' level of education, does not mitigate the cognitive decrements associated with late-life depression.

Journal article

Comparison of suicide in people aged 65-74 and 75+ by gender in England and Wales and the major Western countries 1979-1999

Authors:
PRICHARD Colin, HANSEN Lars
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(1), January 2005, pp.17-25.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The factors most strongly associated with suicide are age and gender - more men than women, and, more people over 65 kill themselves. As a number of Governments have targets to reduce suicide levels we compare elderly suicide rates over a 20-year period in England and Wales. And the major Western countries focusing upon age and gender. Male GSPR: 65-74 suicide ratios fell significantly in six countries and in three for the 75+. Female GSPR: 65-74 suicide ratios fell in every country except Spain. Proportionately, there were more suicides in the over 65s in countries with an extended family tradition, Spain, Italy, Germany, France and Japan, than in the five secular countries. England and Wales male 65-74 suicide fell significantly more than Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Netherlands and the USA, and did significantly better than the other countries for all female senior citizen suicides. Suicide of the over-65s has improved in seven countries, especially in England and Wales, who had the greatest proportional reduction, which reflects well upon the psycho-geriatric and community services. However, in all countries, male 65-74 rates did not match the female out so extra efforts are needed to improve male rates.

Journal article

Is vascular depression a distinct sub-type of depressive disorder?: a review of causal evidence

Author:
BALDWIN Robert C.
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(1), January 2005, pp.1-11.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

A literature review with discussion of findings in the light of recently suggested guidelines for the development of new psychiatric disorders. There is considerable evidence linking depression in later life with vascular brain disease but the interaction is bi-directional. Depression and vascular disease could be mediated by factors other than traditional vascular risk factors. There is increasing interest in mechanisms such as inflammatory processes which may mediate both depression and vascular disease. Vascular depression provides a useful framework with which to remind the clinician of important interactions between depression and vascular disease but conceptually it may be too restrictive.

Journal article

Epidemiology of paranoid symptoms in an elderly population

Authors:
FORSELL Yvonne, HENDERSON Scott A.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 172, May 1998, pp.429-432.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This article aims to estimate the community prevalence and to identify some associated variables. A community sample of 1420 elderly people, was extensively examined by nurses and physicians. Paranoid symptoms in this elderly population were associated most strongly with cognitive impairment. Other associated variables pointed to a higher level of social isolation than others in the community.

Journal article

The practice of geriatric psychiatry in three countries: observations of an American in the British Isles

Author:
REIFLER B.V.
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 12(8), August 1997, pp.795-807.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The author compares the practice of geriatric psychiatry among the three countries: Ireland, the United Kingdom and the United States. Reviews how the practice of geriatric psychiatry is carried out, and the mental health services available in each country, including organisational characteristics. Findings suggest the USA is the most entrepreneurial of the three, Britain's greatest strength is the uniformity and comprehensiveness of its services, and Ireland provides an excellent model for nations of comparable size. Also found that considerable change is occurring in all three countries.

Journal article

Adapting services for a changing society: a reintegrative model for old age psychiatry (based on a model proposed by Knight and Emanuel, 2007)

Authors:
BLANCHARD Martin, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(2), February 2009, pp.202-206.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The authors discuss models of care for older people with mental health problems. The weaknesses of the Recovery model for this group are discussed, and an alternative, the reintegration model is put forward.

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