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Focus on...Health and social benefits of co-located primary care services and extra care housing

Author:
COMMUNITY HEALTH PARTNERSHIPS
Publisher:
Community Health Partnerships
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
2
Place of publication:
London

A short paper outlining the health and social benefits of co-located primary care services and extra care housing. The paper explains how, six years since they opened, Milehouse Primary Care Centre and Mill Rise Extra Care Village, purpose built on the same site, provide an innovative example of the benefits of integrated health care facilities with extra care accommodation for older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors related to frequent usage of the primary healthcare services in old age: findings from The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care

Authors:
RENNEMARK Mikael, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 17(3), May 2009, pp.304-311.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

People aged 60 or more are the most frequent users of healthcare services. In this age range, however, both frequent and infrequent users can be found. Frequent users have high rates of illnesses. Previous research has found that the frequency may be influenced also by psychological and social factors. The aim of this study was to investigate to what degree such factors add to the explanation of differences in number of visits to a physician. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a random sample consisting of 1017 individuals, aged 60 to 78 years, from the Blekinge part of the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care database. The data were collected during 2001 to 2003. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used with frequent (three visits or more during a year) and infrequent use as a dichotomous dependent variable. The final statistical analyses included 643 individuals (63% of the sample). Independent variables were sense of coherence (SOC), internal locus of control, education level and social anchorage. Control variables were age, gender, functional ability and comorbidity. The results showed that comorbidity was most strongly related to frequent use. In addition, SOC and internal locus of control had small, but significant effects on the odds of being a frequent user. The lower the SOC and the internal locus of control were, the higher were the odds of frequent use. Education level and social anchorage were unrelated to frequency of use. The results indicate that frequent healthcare services users are more ill than infrequent users. Psychological factors influence the use only marginally, and social factors as well as age and gender are not by themselves reason for frequent healthcare services use.

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Primary concerns: older people's access to primary care

Author:
AGE CONCERN ENGLAND
Publisher:
Age Concern England
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

The report ‘Primary Concerns’ highlights the fact that older people use GP practice services more than younger adults; however nearly one in five 65-74 year olds are still experiencing difficulties in getting an appointment to see their GP or practice nurse. Research from the charity also shows that almost half of older people are not registered with an NHS dentist, despite a pledge from the Government almost ten years ago promising that everyone would have easy access to an NHS dentist within two years. With a shortage in NHS dentists, pensioners on low fixed incomes are often forced to either pay privately for dental treatment or just go without.  Good oral health is essential to the overall health and well-being of older people and enables people to eat comfortably, enjoy a healthy diet, and speak and socialise without embarrassment.

Book Full text available online for free

Older people and suicide

Author:
BEESTON Derek
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
69p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

The report concludes: People over 65 are the group most likely to carry out a threat of suicide in primary care, with almost one in four attempts resulting in death; People over the age of 65 are more successful than any other age group at taking their own lives; Two thirds of older people who take their own life have been in touch with a primary care professional in the weeks before their death ; Depression in older people is treatable and can be successfully managed.

Journal article

Reciprocal relationship between pain and depression in elderly Chinese primary care patients

Authors:
CHOU Kee-Lee, CHI Iris
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(10), October 2005, pp.945-952.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study examines the reciprocal relationship between pain and depression and to identify whether social support, functional disability or social functioning mediated the link between pain and depression among Hong Kong Chinese elderly primary care patients. Three hundred and eighteen patients were assessed by a trained assessor with MDS-HC at baseline and these subjects were randomly selected from attendants of three randomly selected elderly health centers in Hong Kong. These patients were re-assessed one year after baseline evaluation. Multiple regression analyses revealed that pain at baseline significantly predicted depression at 12-month follow-up assessment when age, gender, martial status, education, and depression at baseline were adjusted for, but depression at baseline was not associated with pain at 12-months after baseline measure while controlling for age, gender, martial status, education, and pain at baseline. However, depression did predict the onset of pain. Moreover, social support, physical disability or social functioning did not mediate the impact of pain on depression. These data suggest that pain is an important predictor of depression in elderly primary care patients. Therefore, aged care service practitioners must take this risk factor into consideration in their preventive intervention and treatment for psychological well-being.

Journal article

GPs 'prescribe' volunteers

Author:
WALFORD Martin
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 9(1), March 2005, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes the CSV's Retired and Senior Volunteers Programme (RSVP) which, through its innovative primary care scheme currently deploys over 2,000 volunteers aged 50 plus to help tackl the health problems of older and disadvantaged people. The volunteers help transport patients who have no access to public transport, assist with collecting house-bound patients' prescriptions, and help with disabled patients.

Journal article

Proactive, targeted benefits advice for older people in general practice: a feasibility study

Authors:
TOEG Daniel, at al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(2), March 2003, pp.124-128.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aimed to assess a welfare benefits and advice screening programme offered in a systematic and inclusive way to all patients aged 80 and over registered with an inner-city NHS group practice with 7 full-time GPs and a list of 12,000 of whom 280 were identified as 80 and over. Using a combination of telephone calls, surgery attendances and home visits, an advice worker contacted as many of these as possible. A wide range of advice and assistance of both a statutory and non-statutory nature was offered. Follow-up contacts and liaison with the patients' own GPs were arranged as necessary. Contact was made with 206. The adviser made 98 home visits, carried out 82 consultations in the surgery and did 109 telephone interviews. Findings indicate a total of £137,819 was gained in increased annual income amongst the screened patients and a further £11,433 was awarded in one-off payments. A wide range of other benefits and help, including referral to other services and organisations, was gained. Elderly patients within the practice were under-claiming benefits and had many previously unidentified needs. Adopting a proactive and inclusive approach to offering welfare and advice takes time and expense, but the resulting benefits make it worthwhile. Primary care is an effective base from which advice can be delivered and the development of closer working relationships between it and advice services can be an effective and efficient way of helping patients.

Journal article

A portrait of district nursing: its contribution to primary health care

Authors:
GOODMAN Claire, te al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interprofessional Care, 17(1), February 2003, pp.97-108.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

Explores the role and contribution of district nursing within primary health care. Uses examples of how this service is organised within different health care systems (Australia, the USA and Far East) to discusses the context-dependent nature and challenges of the work. Argues that significance and potential of district nursing services are frequently overlooked. Recommends that a research strategy for district nursing should build on the profession's comprehensive understanding of the needs and families and communities and should aim to provide evidence for practice that will further improve patient and client outcomes.

Book

Equity in health and social care

Authors:
EVANDROU Maria, et al
Publisher:
London School of Economics. Suntory-Toyota International Centre for Economics an
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
70p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Studies equity in the distribution of primary health care and domiciliary care for elders.

Book Full text available online for free

GP services in Wales: the perspective of older people. Older people's experiences of accessing and using GP services in Wales

Author:
OLDER PEOPLE'S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES
Publisher:
Older People's Commissioner for Wales
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
114
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This report captures the voices and experiences of older people, setting out their perspective on accessing and using GP services in Wales. Findings are based on information shared by over 1,600 older people from across Wales and a wide range of stakeholders from the public and third sectors. The study finds that there are significant variations in older people’s experiences of GP services, with particular issues around the appointments booking process, the accessibility of GP surgeries and the surgery environment, the time available for appointments, communication and privacy. Specifically, the report indicates that: for too many older people, making an appointment is challenging, inflexible and unresponsive to individual needs and circumstances; the accessibility of many existing buildings continues to act as a barrier to access for some older people; for a number of older people, their GP service is not sufficiently aware of, or responsive to, their individual communication needs, particularly those living with a sensory loss or dementia or cognitive impairment; there is an understanding, whether perceived or explicit, that older people can only raise one issue within a ten-minute appointment – this could jeopardise their ability to have a say in decision making and reduce their confidence; some older people who wish to access GP services in the Welsh language are experiencing; and too many older people find it difficult to provide feedback, or raise a concern or complaint. (Edited publisher abstract)

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