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Book

Taking prevention forward: a directory of examples

Authors:
LEWIS Helen, MILNE Alisoun
Publisher:
Anchor Research
Publication year:
1999
Place of publication:
Oxford

This directory is the final part of the work commissioned from the Nuffield Institute of Health, University of Leeds for the National Preventative Task Group. Its aim is to provide some more concrete examples of preventative approaches and services currently in operation around the country. While most of the examples relate to older people, who were the focus of the original work, thre are also examples relating to other adults, in line with the national policy of 'promoting independence'. (need to refer to others in this series)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Older people's contribution to understanding and preventing avoidable hospital admissions

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
18 mins 50 secs
Place of publication:
London

This video summarises the key findings of a research project conducted by the University of Birmingham’s Health Services Management Centre and the Department of Social Policy and Social Work which interviewed 104 older people about their emergency admissions to hospital. The research looked at how the older people were admitted to hospital, whether they felt this was the best place for them and what alternatives might have been explored. Similar questions were also asked of a GP and / or hospital doctor representing as many of these older people as possible. Overall, the study found that most older people were admitted to hospital appropriately. Only nine of 104 older people (almost 9%) felt that hospital was not the right place for them. Key findings covered in the video include: delays in seeking help; prevention and early intervention; poor communication; proactive initial approaches; working with GPs and paramedics; and the underfunding of social care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Top tips for managing the crisis: older people's emergency admissions to hospital

Authors:
GLASBY Jon, et al
Publisher:
University of Birmingham. School of Social Policy
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
12
Place of publication:
Birmingham

This resource identifies ten key themes, or ‘top tips’, which could help health and social care services to reduce inappropriate hospital admissions. It has been developed from a national research project which involved interviews and focus groups with older people and their families, and front-line health and social care professionals. It is argued that these ‘perceptions’ from older people and front-line staff are important as they can have a significant impact on how people live their life and access services. The themes cover: not making older people feel they are a burden; making community alternatives to hospital easier to access; to distinguish between ‘inappropriate’ and ‘preventable’ admissions; the need for early action; the importance role of adult social care; and the importance of engaging with older people to understand and respond to the increasing number of emergency admissions. Quotations from older people, their families and professionals are included throughout to illustrate key points. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Falls in older people with sight loss: a review of emerging research and key action points

Author:
THOMAS POCKLINGTON TRUST
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

Draws on recent research to summarise what is known about falls and falls prevention amongst older people with sight loss. It explores the implications of research findings for action to address and reduce the risk of falls among older people with sight loss and suggests key issues for health and social care professionals to consider when working with older people, many of whom may have sight loss, and for sight loss specialists to consider when addressing individuals’ risks of falls. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A systematic review of education for the prevention of HIV/AIDS among older adults

Authors:
MILASZEWSKI Dorota, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, 9(3), June 2012, pp.213-230.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This literature review examined articles focused on primary prevention of HIV/AIDS for adults aged 50 and over. A total of twenty one English language articles were included. Three major challenges were identified in providing HIV/AIDS education for older adults include health professionals' ageism, older adults' reluctance to discuss sexuality, and their misconception of their HIV risk. Clinical guidelines for social workers, nurses, and physicians identified the importance of sharing information and assessing risk, considering cultural diversity, and devising creative delivery strategies. Three models of HIV/AIDS education include group education programmes delivered by social workers or other health professionals, peer education models, and one-on-one early intervention models including HIV/AIDS testing. The authors concluded that additional outreach and research on HIV/AIDS prevention among older adults is required.

Journal article

Falls after discharge from hospital: is there a gap between older peoples’ knowledge about falls prevention strategies and the research evidence?

Authors:
HILL Anne-Marie, et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 51(5), October 2011, pp.653-662.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

This study explored whether older people were prepared to engage in appropriate falls prevention strategies after discharge from hospital in Swan Districts hospital, Perth, Australia. Three hundred and thirty three older patients about to be discharged from hospital were surveyed about their knowledge regarding falls prevention strategies. Participants were asked to suggest strategies to reduce their falls risk at home after discharge, and their responses were compared with reported research evidence for falls prevention interventions. Strategies were classified into 7 categories: behavioural; support while mobilising; approach to movement; physical environment; visual; medical; and activities or exercise. Although exercise has been identified as an effective falls risk reduction strategy, only about 3% of participants suggested engaging in exercises. Falls prevention was most often conceptualised by participants as requiring one or two strategies for avoiding an accidental event, rather than engaging in sustained multiple risk reduction behaviours. Overall, patients had low levels of knowledge about appropriate falls prevention strategies. The authors concluded that health care workers should design and deliver falls prevention education programmes specifically targeted to older people discharged from hospital.

Journal article

Preventing falls: how to monitor risk and intervene

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Nursing and Residential Care, 13(2), February 2011, pp.82-84.
Publisher:
MA Healthcare Ltd.
Place of publication:
London

Highlights what care homes can do to prevent falls in their older residents. The article looks at possible risks and preventive interventions such as physical exercise.

Book Full text available online for free

Making a strategic shift towards prevention and early intervention: key messages for decision makers

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
18p.
Place of publication:
London

This document is designed to provide practical guidance to local authorities and health communities on how to make a strategic shift to prevention and early intervention In doing this it draws on the experiences and evidence emerging from the first two years of the Partnerships for Older People Projects (POPP) programme and other related initiatives such as the Department for Work and Pensions’ Linkage Plus programme. The guide focuses on promoting the independence and wellbeing of older people and is intended to develop over time to include transferable learning for other client groups.

Journal article

How balance can overcome barriers

Author:
CARTER Kathy
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing, 9(1), March 2008, pp.41-44.
Publisher:
Pier Professional
Place of publication:
Brighton

Balance is key to improving the quality of life for older patients. This article looks at barriers to participation which exist in different forms in all areas of fitness and exercise, and are of an emotional or practical nature. The article also highlights the BalanceMaster machine, a piece of equipment that helps with balance and confidence.

Journal article

Change of approach needed in fracture prevention

Author:
HAIRON Nerys
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 29.1.08, 2008, pp.23-24.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

New research suggests that the NHS approach to fracture prevention should shift its focus from osteoporosis to preventing falls. The analysis says that falling is the strongest single risk factor for fracture. This article summarises the research findings and also highlights NICE (2004) guidance on assessing and preventing falls in older people.

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