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Book

Poverty and older people: papers presented to a National Conference "Stake a claim, maximising older people's income" at the Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, 1986

Author:
AGE CONCERN SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
48p., illus., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Papers cover various aspects of poverty for older people, including the reasons behind low take-up of benefits.

Book Full text available online for free

Older, not colder: why older people need warm homes

Author:
AGE UK
Publisher:
Age UK
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
31
Place of publication:
London

Sets out the range of problems that older people face in winter, looking specifically at fuel poverty, winter health and excess winter deaths. It focuses on the challenges faced by older people living in rural communities, including those of older residents of park homes. The document also examines specific problems with the energy market, such as understanding fuel bills and tariffs, costs for non-direct debit customers, prepayment meters and the Green Deal. It concludes that an ambitious energy efficiency programme to bring all housing up to standard is the only long-term solution to fuel poverty and winter health problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Living on a low income in later life

Authors:
HILL Catherine, HIRSCH Donald
Publisher:
Age UK
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
10p.
Place of publication:
London

Despite a decrease in the number of older people living in poverty, 1.8 million pensioners (16% of pensioners) still do, and this figure has stagnated. This research provides an in-depth exploration of the experiences of older people living on low incomes. It illuminates the decisions and choices that older people face in managing their finances and the practical and emotional impact of living in constrained circumstances. The research consisted of 25 individual in-depth interviews and 5 focus group discussions with people aged 65-87 years. All interviews and focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The findings are discussed under the following 5 themes: perceptions of hardship; the practicalities of living on a low income; the emotional aspects of living on a low income; spending decisions; and what protects or disadvantages people’s financial circumstances. The findings show that people were finding life tough living on a low income. Most were strongly averse to debt and believed that you had to live within your means. Those few who had some form of debt demonstrated the difficulty of getting back on track when on a fixed low income. They were very concerned about the current economic climate and about the removal of services that were currently available.

Journal article

Aging in poverty: making the case for comprehensive care management

Authors:
JUDD Rebecca G., MOORE Brenda A.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 54(7), October 2011, pp.647-658.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

As poorer individuals age, health related problems often arise. Yet, traversing the system of services can be difficult. In this article, the authors propose a model for holistic care management designed to enhance outcomes for financially vulnerable older adults who receive an array of disjointed services administered through the older Americans Act and local Area Agencies on Aging. The suggest that fragmented service delivery is typically wasteful and ineffectual, but comprehensive care management that includes an autonomous care manager, a single interagency plan of care and ongoing monitoring that is client-centred may protect those aging in poverty from negative health outcomes. The authors conclude that the building of a comprehensive care plan, which results in a proactive plan to alleviate the potential for future problems, could be the first step in assisting vulnerable older adults.

Book Full text available online for free

Improving poverty and social exclusion measures for older people

Author:
PASTOS Demi
Publisher:
Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK: the 2011 survey
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
72p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Bristol

The Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK Project is a 3.5 year collaboration which aims to advance the ‘state of the art’ of the theory and practice of poverty and social exclusion measurement. This paper provides a focused review of various measures pertaining to older people used in the 1999 Poverty and Social Exclusion (PSE) survey and offers suggestions for improvement for the PSE 2011 main survey. This review does not cover the full range of domains/sub-domains found in the Bristol-Social Exclusion Matrix (B-SEM), but focuses on areas which have the greatest scope for improvement in terms of measuring the poverty and social exclusion of older people. Existing and planned national surveys were reviewed as potential sources for specific questions and items in the following key areas: deprivation; social capital; limitations in activities of daily living; receipt of informal care; receipt of health and social services; and provision of unpaid care. These areas are reviewed, and recommendations made with regard to potential questions and areas for improvement.

Journal article

A life course approach to understanding poverty among older American adults

Authors:
RANK Mark R., WILLIAMS James Herbert
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 91(4), October 2010, pp.337-341.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

A relatively new strategy for studying the prevalence of poverty in America is to analyse it as a potential life course event. In this study this approach is used in order to examine the likelihood of both income and asset poverty for individuals between the ages of 60 and 90. The estimates reported are based upon data taken from the biennial survey, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). Estimates are made of the cumulative likelihood that Americans between the ages of 60 and 90 will experience at least 1 year of income poverty and also whether they possess a level of assets that would enable them to remain above the official poverty line for 3 months. The results show that nearly half of all elderly Americans will encounter at least 1 year of poverty or near poverty across these ages. In addition, 58% of those between the ages of 60 and 84 will at some point fail to have enough liquid assets to allow them to weather an unanticipated expense or downturn in income. The policy and practice implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal article

Multiple program participation and exits from food stamps among elders

Author:
ISSAR Sukriti
Journal article citation:
Social Service Review, 84(3), September 2010, pp.437-459.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press

The Food Stamp Program is a federally funded food assistance programme. In 2008 it was renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and is often described as the first line of defence against hunger. This study uses population-level administrative data from Rhode Island's Food Stamp Program to investigate exits from the Food Stamp Program by older people. Multivariate event history models estimate the relations of multiple programme participation and the timing of eligibility reviews to the probability of exiting food stamps. Findings indicate that older people who are age 65 or older and who receive both Supplemental Security Income and Food Stamps have a higher probability of exiting the Food Stamp Program than do older people who receive only food stamps. The timing of eligibility reviews is also found to be positively associated with the probability of exit from food stamps. In this article the author argues to extend conceptual models of the determinants of food stamp exits.

Journal article

Determining semi-normative poverty lines using social survey debate

Author:
DEEMING Christopher
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 43(3), June 2009, pp.270-289.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Debates about how to set minimum income standards for health and general well-being are very current in Britain. Family budget standards remain popular but the results can be criticized for being little more than abstractions. They are to an extent 'artificial' and this raises questions about their 'real adequacy'. Another way to operationalize adequacy of income, in a lived sense, is to consider the household income levels at which a specified, desirable, healthy standard of living is in fact achieved, indicated here by diet and nutrition. Data are taken from the United Kingdom's Expenditure and Food Survey; the sample has been restricted to an older population, and three years of data (2002–5) provided a combined sample of 4,300 households. The study findings and semi-normative poverty lines are critically discussed in relation to the national UK policy context as well as the international research literature on poverty measurement.

Book Full text available online for free

Measuring material deprivation among older people: methodological study to revise the family resources survey questions

Author:
McKAY Stephen
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
60p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The objective of this project was to better understand how to measure material deprivation amongst older people in surveys. The report details findings from new quantitative work using omnibus questions on what are regarded as necessary items for older people, as well as new cognitive testing work, conducted by the National Centre for Social Research, to better understand how to ask older people about material deprivation. The report makes recommendations on the implementation of the new question block on the Family Resources Survey (FRS). Readers are recommended to also consult DWP Working paper 55, Cognitive testing: older people and the FRS material deprivation questions (released at the same time), undertaken by the National Centre for Social Research, which provides greater detail on the cognitive testing study

Journal article

Financial strain, negative social interaction, and self-rated health: evidence from two United States nationwide longitudinal surveys

Authors:
KRAUSE Neal, NEWSOM Jason T., ROOK Karen S.
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 28(7), October 2008, pp.1001-1023.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Three hypotheses concerning negative social interaction in later life were evaluated in this study. First, it was predicted that greater personal economic difficulty is associated with more frequent negative social interaction with social network members in general. Secondly, it was proposed that more frequent negative social interaction exacerbates the undesirable effect of personal financial strain on change in self-rated health during late life. Thirdly, an effort was made to see if some types of negative social interaction, but not others, accentuate the undesirable effects of personal economic problems on self-rated health. Data from two nationwide longitudinal surveys that were conducted in the United States revealed that greater personal financial difficulty is associated with more interpersonal conflict. The findings further indicate that the undesirable effects of personal economic difficulty on change in self-rated health are more pronounced at progressively higher levels of negative social interaction. Finally, the data suggest that one form of negative social interaction (not getting help when it is expected) is more likely to intensify the unwanted effects of personal financial strain on self-rated health than other types of negative social interaction.

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