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Book

Person-centred thinking with older people: 6 essential practices

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, BOWN Helen, BAILEY Gill
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
96
Place of publication:
London

Drawing on a wealth of experience of working with older people, this book presents six essential person-centred practices. Person-centred practices are a key way to provide the best possible care and support for older people and help them to be active and valued members of the community. Each of the practices is designed to support the individual and put what is important to and for the person at the forefront of their care. Each practice has been tailored so that older people can express more easily what does and does not work for them. By actively listening and making each person feel appreciated, the practices represent practical tools for frontline practitioners to form good relationships with people in their care. With supporting stories and full colour photographs to illustrate how person-centred thinking and practice is used in real-life settings, the book contains many examples to help practitioners to overcome challenges and to implement positive, effective changes to care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Go gentle into that good night: the past, present, and future of end-of-life care

Author:
SINGER Adam E.
Publisher:
Rand Corporation
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
382
Place of publication:
Santa Monica, CA

This dissertation examines the past, present, and future of end-of-life care in order to shed light on the most effective ways to organise and deliver it. End-of-life care has received increasing attention in recent years as the baby boomers age and health care costs continue to rise. This attention has brought with it remarkable growth in the field and improvement in care, but there remains work to be done in order to more consistently deliver high quality, compassionate, and patient- and family-centred end-of-life care. The paper presents the results of a cohort study into the symptom trends in the last year of life, 1998‐2010. It then summarises the findings of a systematic review of populations and interventions for palliative and end‐of‐life care and looks at the evidence on estimating the value of palliative care for older adults. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Sexuality and dementia: a review of research literature

Author:
HEATH Hazel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 20(4), July 2012, pp.35-39.
Publisher:
Hawker

Sexuality remains an intrinsic part of being human throughout life and through health and illness. It helps contribute to a person’s identity. Helping people with dementia retain this is fundamental to person-centred care. This article reviews the research literature on sexuality issues for people affected by dementia and evidence to support practice for staff working with these individuals and their families. This review revealed expression of sexuality in care home environments to be particularly complex, and the importance of this research for people with dementia, families and staff is highlighted.

Journal article

Person centred dementia care: problems and possibilities

Author:
ARGYLE Elaine
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 16(2), 2012, pp.69-77.
Publisher:
Emerald

The implementation and efficacy of person centred approaches in dementia care is difficult to measure and there are still huge variations in working practices. In order to address these issues the procedure of dementia care mapping has been developed, which aims to assess the wellbeing of people with dementia and other vulnerable groups through the observation of communal activities. This article assesses the implementation of a person centred approach with a group of care home residents. All were female, their ages ranged from 77 to 92. Findings suggest that while participants potentially experienced many benefits from person centred approaches and the social engagement and integration that derived from this, its efficacy and impact was undermined by contextual factors such as staff shortages. The author concluded that practice should transcend its focus on the promotion of individual wellbeing and address the wider group and social contexts which can facilitate or prevent its fulfilment.

Journal article

Trajectories of at-homeness and health in usual care and small house nursing homes

Authors:
MOLONY Sheila, et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 51(4), August 2011, pp.504-515.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Long-term care providers across the United States are building new residential environments that weave humanistic person-centred philosophies into clinical care, organisational policies, and built environments. The small house model (SmH) relocates the resident from institutional care to a place that is believed to better emulate home. The aim of this study was to compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over time between residents remaining in a usual care nursing home and residents moving from that home to a SmH. The setting for the study was a 100-bed nursing home in a continuing care retirement community in the Midwest. Five new SmHs were built as part of this retirement community. Interviews were conducted with residents before the move to the SmHs and 1, 3, and 6 months after the move. The findings showed that prior to the move individuals who decided to relocate to the SmH had more depressive symptoms and lower levels of at-homeness. Their levels of at-homeness increased after the move, and, in addition, their levels of functional dependence decreased. Most participants who chose to stay in the nursing home reported high baseline levels of at-homeness and maintained this over the next 6 months. Qualitative findings highlight the variables that contributed to at-homeness in both groups. The study demonstrates that a ‘one size fits all’ approach may not be best because at-homeness is an individualised construct.

Book

Counselling older people with alcohol problems

Authors:
FOX Mike, BLANCHARD Martin
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
208p.
Place of publication:
London

Providing effective counselling services to the growing number of over-55s who misuse alcohol requires a specialised approach. They are often patronised, their ability to recover not acknowledged, and expected to fit into generic treatment systems. This practical guide explores the factors that differentiate older drinkers, and introduces a person-centred model designed to help counsellors and other healthcare professionals provide this group of clients with the help and support they need. Older people with alcohol problems often have complex personal histories, and are particularly vulnerable to long-term dependency, social isolation and self-medication. The authors explore the influences, patterns and triggers that affect the development and progression of alcohol dependency in this age group, and provide a detailed description of a theoretical model and therapeutic process that has proved successful in practice. Illustrative case studies are included and guidance is also given for working with clients with dementia or mental health problems. The book is aimed at counsellors and other healthcare professionals who encounter alcohol problems in their clinical practice, including clinical psychologists, social workers, occupational therapists and community psychiatric nurses.

Book Full text available online for free

Living well: thinking and planning for the end of your life

Authors:
HELEN SANDERSON ASSOCIATES, LANCASHIRE County Council
Publisher:
HSA Press
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
Stockport

A guide to help older people think about and record what is important to them now, and what they want in the future – i.e. end of your life planning. The whole guide, or just the sections that are relevant to an individual, can be completed either individually or with family, friends or staff.  It includes sections on: what is my history… my important memories?; thinking about relationships; what does a good day and a bad day look like for me?; what is important to me now, and how I want to be supported; what is working and not working in my life and what do I want to change?; if I could, I would…; what I want and do not want in the future - my hopes and fears; making changes to my life - my action plan. The guide has been based on the person centred thinking tools developed by The Learning Community for Person Centred Practices.

Journal article

The brain and person-centred care: 2. Making sense of the paradoxes of dementia

Author:
MILWAIN Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 18(1), January 2010, pp.23-25.
Publisher:
Hawker

Dementia is defined as a syndrome of acquired intellectual loss, in which memory and at least one other cognitive function are damaged to such a degree that a person's normal life and functions are adversely affected. In this second article of a series on the brain and dementia care, the author explains how an understanding of the organisation of the human brain, and the fact that it is not one structure but many, can help with understanding some aspects of dementia including Alzheimer's disease. The article gives a brief overview of how the brain is organised, highlighting how certain structures of the brain are vulnerable to the causes of dementia but others less so and that of all the structures of the brain it is the cerebral cortex which is most involved in the symptoms of dementia, and noting that it is vital that each person is assessed individually, because different kinds of dementia will affect different parts of the brain.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Time to drive personalisation

Author:
HOPE Phil
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 5.2.09, 2009, p.30.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A key finding from the evaluation of the individual budget pilots suggested that many older people and their carers did not want the additional burden that they associated with planning and managing their own support. This article provides some tips to help older people, their carers and their families experience the benefits of personalisation. These include: taking a person-centred approach; remaining flexible; and providing choice for older people on managing the money they are given through personalisation.

Book Full text available online for free

Confidence in caring: a framework for best practice

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
37p.
Place of publication:
London

In a rapidly changing world it is vital that nursing continues to command the confidence and trust of patients. For the growing numbers of older people admitted to our busy hospital wards this is determined by the whole care experience; yet we constantly hear of deficiencies in caring. Confidence in caring developed in response to this. It emerged from a national project with patients, relatives and staff in several hospitals across the country; it aimed to help nurses meet the many challenges of caring today and put the values and ideals on which nursing is founded, into practice. Confidence in caring offers a shared language and shared understanding of what caring means for older people and describes what caring looks like so that it can be observed, improved and rewarded.

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