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National survey of investment in mental health services for older people 2011/12

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH STRATEGIES
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
47p.
Place of publication:
London

This report presents the results of the finance mapping exercise carried out as part of the autumn review process. It provides details of the level of investment in mental health services for older people’s mental health services (OPMH) covering people aged 65 and above, in England for 2011/12 and compares it with the reported results in previous in OPMH in England since 2006/07. Overall, 87% of OPMH investment by value was reported with only 13% being estimated – a little higher estimation than last year but still very creditable for a non-mandatory collection. Return rates were better from PCTs than Local Authorities (89% investment reported compared to 84%). The largest area of non-returns was the same as the working age adult survey, from the West Midlands area which consequently has a much higher level of estimation. Total reported overall cash investment in OPMH mental health services fell by -1.00% from £2.859 billion in 2010/11 to £2.830 billion in 2011/12. 62% of the OPMH services in 2011/12 were commissioned by PCTs and 38% reported commissioned by Local Authorities.

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A long time coming: part 1: strategies for achieving age equality in mental health services

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
27p.
Place of publication:
Bath

This document reports on the findings of the Achieving Age Equality in Mental Health Network. The Network ran from November 2010 to March 2011 and consisted of 4 different elements: development support to 2 localities based in the Midlands; a call for information on practical examples of age equality in mental health services; analysis of local and national data; and a review of concurrent national and development programmes. The development support provided to the 2 health and social care communities in the Midlands involved the audit of local mental health services to establish whether and where age discrimination exists and to identify priority actions for developing cost effective and inclusive mental health systems for all ages. This document is the first of 2 reports arising from this work. It focuses on the findings, key messages and priorities for achieving age equality. It identifies the critical issues that need urgent attention in order to eradicate age discrimination in mental health services everywhere. A central message is the need for much greater clarity and a shared understanding about age equality in respect of mental health and mental health services. The report sets out 4 priority actions identified by the Network that need to be taken forward at both a local and a national level.

Book Full text available online for free

A long time coming: part 2: achieving age equality in local mental health services

Author:
NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
52p.
Place of publication:
Bath

This document reports on the findings of the Achieving Age Equality in Mental Health Network. The Network ran from November 2010 to March 2011 and consisted of 4 different elements: development support to 2 localities based in the Midlands; a call for information on practical examples of age equality in mental health services; analysis of local and national data; and a review of concurrent national and development programmes. This document is the second of 2 reports arising from this work. It shares the experiences and lessons from the activities undertaken by the 2 Network sites, and the experiences of working in partnership to audit their mental health services, explore issues of discrimination and equality, and identify priority actions in order to address the identified age discrimination. The report outlines the practical steps that local health and social care communities can take to audit their services in order to identify where discrimination exists and what needs to happen in order to achieve age equality.

Journal article

Attitudes towards mental health services in Hispanic older adults: the role of misconceptions and personal beliefs

Authors:
JANG Yuri, et al
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 47(2), April 2011, pp.164-170.
Publisher:
Springer

Focusing on misconceptions and personal beliefs associated with depression, this study explored predictors of attitudes toward mental health services in a sample of 297 Hispanic older adults living in public housing in the USA. Results from a hierarchical regression analysis showed that negative attitudes towards mental health services were predicted by advanced age, belief that having depression would make family members disappointed, and belief that counselling brings too many bad feelings such as anger and sadness. Findings suggest that interventions designed to promote positive attitudes toward mental health services of older Hispanics should address misconceptions and personal beliefs.

Journal article

Suicide ideation in older adults: relationship to mental health problems and service use

Authors:
CORNA Laurie M., CAIRNEY John, STREINER David L.
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 50(6), December 2010, pp.785-797.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of suicide ideation among community-dwelling older adults and the relationship between suicide ideation, major psychiatric disorder, and mental health service use. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 1.2: Mental Health and Well-being (CCHS 1.2) for all adults aged 55 years and over was used to estimate the prevalence of suicide ideation and the prevalence of major psychiatric disorder and service use among ideators versus nonideators. Using multivariate models, the study considered the sociodemographic, social, and mental health correlates of suicide ideation and mental health care use. The results showed that more than 2% of older adults reported suicide ideation in the past year and more than two thirds of these respondents did not meet the criteria for any of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders assessed in the CCHS 1.2. In multivariate models, being male, younger, or widowed, reporting lower social support and higher psychological distress increased the likelihood of suicide ideation. More than 50% of the respondents who reported suicidal thoughts did not access any type of mental health care use. The article concludes that, although suicide ideation is associated with depression and anxiety disorders, many older adults with suicidal thoughts do not meet the criteria for these clinical disorders.

Journal article

Access to public mental health services among older adults with severe mental illness

Authors:
GILMER Todd P., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(3), March 2009, pp.313-318.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Data from San Diego County, 2002-2006, were used to examine how older adults initially accessed the public mental health system, and their utilization over the subsequent 90 days. Multivariate regression models were used to control for demographic and clinical characteristics. Older adults (age 60 +) were more likely to access the public mental health system through the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team (PERT), a combined law-enforcement and psychiatric service that responds to psychiatric related 911 calls. Older adults were also less likely to receive follow-up care. This lower rate of follow-up was due to both the initial site of service - and an associated lower rate of follow-up among PERT clients - as well as a lower rate of follow-up among older adult clients initiating services in other sectors.  This paper suggests two areas for intervention that would improve access to care for older adults: improving linkages and referrals between PERT and outpatient providers; and additional efforts to retain older adults at outpatient programs.

Journal article

Purchasing power: getting the best for older people

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, November 2008, pp.26-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The authors discuss some of the challenges facing commissioners who are purchasing mental health services for older people. They briefly highlight some of the main complexities which include: the complexity of older people's identities; the make up of workforces; the difficult nature of work with older people; and the multiple agencies involved in working with older people. It is argued that consistent application of a long-term strategy, which allows the accumulation of small changes across agencies and disciplines, is likely to be the key to success. It sets out the issues that need to be addressed, the pitfalls to avoid, and examines a series of objectives for commissioners.

Journal article

The mental health of older people: taking a long view

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 16(5), October 2008, pp.4-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article sets out some of the challenges facing commissioners of mental health services for older people, and uses recommendations from a recent inquiry to outline possible commissioning objectives.

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Age equality: what does it mean for older people's mental health services?

Author:
CARE SERVICES IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP. National Older People's Mental Health Programme
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership. National Older People's Mental Health Programme
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

A 4-page report on older people's mental health services: Providing age inclusive services is an issue currently hotly debated across the country. In some cases it is even slowing progress in the implementation of Everybody's Business. This short paper attempts to clarify what is meant by service provision based on need not age.

Journal article

Issues in mental health care for older adults after disasters

Author:
BROWN Lisa M.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 31(4), Winter 2007, pp.21-26.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

This article describes key issues to consider when providing mental health care to older adults after a disaster. It covers strategies to assessment mental and medical health needs, provides an overview of interventions for use with older people during the recovery process, and identifies some of the challenges that might be encountered when providing services to older people across various settings.

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