Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 542

Book

Mental health and well-being in later life

Authors:
CATTAN Mima, (ed.)
Publisher:
Open University Press
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
177p.
Place of publication:
Maidenhead

The contributors to this book ask what mental health and mental well-being is and discuss theoretical perspectives on ageing and health promotion; policy and practice in the promotion of mental health and well-being in later life; work, retirement and money; relationships; keeping active; and coping, choice and control: pathways to positive psychological functioning and independence in later life, ending with a conclusion.

Journal article

Feel good factor

Author:
LEASON Katie
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.05.05, 2005, pp.34-35.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Promoting mental health well-being in later life has often been overlooked in care budgets. Reports on the issues and how they can be tackled.

Journal article

Elderly volunteering and psychological well-being

Author:
HO Hua-Chin
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 60(4), 2017, pp.1028-1038.
Publisher:
Sage

This study was designed to construct a model based on the concept of psychological well-being, in order to verify the relationship between Taiwanese elderly volunteering and their psychological well-being. Research data were collected via a questionnaire administered to the target population of this study, senior residents of Pingtung County aged 65 or more. The data were then tested and verified by confirmative factor analysis and structural equation modelling. The overall model showed higher levels of psychological well-being for the elderly who participated in volunteer work than those who did not, which again confirmed the positive relation between volunteer work and psychological well-being. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Prison experiences and psychological distress among older inmates

Authors:
BAIDAWI Susan, TROTTER Christopher, FLYNN Catherine
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 59(3), 2016, pp.252-270.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study investigates relationships between older prisoners’ social experiences and their levels of distress. One hundred and seventy-three older prisoners (aged ≥ 50 years) from 8 Australian prisons were administered the Kessler Psychological Distress (K10) Scale, with additional information collected via individual interviews. Psychological distress scores were significantly associated with measures of self-reported safety, prison victimisation, perceived social support from staff and inmates, current employment, and level of exercise among older inmates. Findings suggest that strategies for improving sense of safety, social support and level of exercise may ameliorate distress among older prisoners. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Variations in structures, processes and outcomes of community mental health teams for older people: a systematic review of the literature

Authors:
ABENDSTERN M., et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 16(7), September 2012, pp.861-873.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Specialist community mental health teams (CMHTs) are central to the provision of comprehensive services for older people with mental ill health. Recent guidance documents suggest a core set of attributes that such teams should encompass. This literature review explored existing evidence regarding the structures and processes of CMHTs for older people and to evaluate evidence linking approaches to effectiveness. Searches were limited to the UK for descriptions of organisation and practice. Forty-five studies met inclusion criteria of which seven provided comparative outcome data. Limited evidence was found regarding the effectiveness of many of the core attributes recommended in policy directives although their presence was reported in much of the literature. The contrast between presentation and evaluation of attributes is stark. Whilst some gaps can be filled from related fields, further research is required to evaluate the impact of team design on service user outcomes in order to inform future guidance.

Journal article

Divorce and the wellbeing of older Australians

Authors:
GRAY Matthew, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 31(3), April 2011, pp.475-498.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

In most developed countries, the number of older people who have experienced divorce at some point in their lives will increase in coming decades. However, there is a lack of research on the long-term effects of divorce in later life. This study, drawing from Australian data, examines the long-term impacts of divorce on the well-being of older Australians. Dimensions of well-being examined are social interaction and connectedness, perceived social support, life satisfaction, and physical and mental health. Findings suggest that while divorce has a long-lasting, negative impact on well-being that persists into later life for both men and women, the negative effects of divorce are largely confined to those who do not re-partner. One important difference between men and women is that for women who are divorced and remain single, the negative effects of divorce are found for general health, vitality and mental health. For men, there appear to be no long-term effects of divorce on physical or mental health. While there appears to be some effect of divorce on perceived social support for both older men and women, the effects of divorce on social support are less pervasive in later life than the effects of divorce on satisfaction with life.

Journal article Full text available online for free

The role of music and emotion in older people’s experience of taking part in dance groups

Authors:
PAULSON Susan, WILLIG Cara
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 21(1), January 2011, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

The research question driving the ethnographic research reported in this paper was how do various ‘cultures of dance’ construct experiences of health and growing older. Two circle dance groups and two Scottish country dance groups, attended by older people, were involved in the study. The authors conclude that the findings demonstrate that older people are spontaneously finding their own ways of promoting their own mental and physical well being through music and dance, without being part of a planned health promotion intervention or a music and dance therapy group designed for older people suffering from physical or mental illness.

Journal article

Is exercise effective in promoting mental well-being in older age? A systematic review

Authors:
WINDLE Gill, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 14(6), August 2010, pp.652-669.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and cost effectiveness of exercise and physical activity interventions on mental well-being in people aged over 65 years. The researchers undertook a literature search for reports published in English, with a comparison or control group or offering qualitative evidence, concerning exercise and physical activity interventions, and including outcome measures of mental well-being. This article describes the methods used and studies identified. The meta-analysis highlights that exercise and physical activity can be effective in improving the mental well-being of people aged 65 and over, and the authors suggest that, as a minimum, the evidence indicates two exercise sessions per week of light to moderate intensity, each of a 45 minute duration. The article discusses findings and implications for policy, practice, and further research. The authors note that the effects found for selected groups of older people outside the UK would indicate that there is a need for more evidence of effectiveness from older people in the UK, particularly older males and minority ethnic groups.

Journal article

Persistence in goal striving and positive reappraisal as psychosocial resources for ageing well: a dyadic analysis

Author:
WINDSOR Tim D.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 13(6), November 2009, pp.874-884.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This study looks at the association of individuals and their spouses tendencies towards goal striving and positive reappraisal with the individuals’ characteristics of successful aging.  The indices of successful aging used were: physical and mental health, life satisfaction, and social networks and engagement.  It was hypothesised that goal persistence and positive reappraisal would be positively associated with aging well.  One hundred and twenty married couples with an age range of 52 to 90 completed a questionnaire concerned with psychosocial correlates of mental health and well-being.  The results showed that individuals’ tendencies towards positive reappraisal were positively related to physical and mental health and life satisfaction, and were also related to more extensive social networks.  Individuals’ persistence in goal striving was associated with better mental health but not to any of the other indices of aging well.  Spouses’ goal persistence and reappraisal tendencies were not related to individuals’ aging well.  The author concludes that the results highlight the value of positive reappraisal as a copying strategy to loss of primary control later in life.

Journal article

The Ransackers project: educational adventures for older learners

Author:
KATHCHILD June
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 13(1), March 2009, pp.23-26.
Publisher:
Emerald

Research shows that people who are engaged in formal learning in later life are physically and mentally healthier and more able to deal with the stress of depression and bereavement. This article describes a project that has created a range of opportunities for older people to access higher education. Ransackers students spend a term in residence  at one of four residential colleges in England, pursuing a project of interest and developing research skills. Students are supported  by individual tutorship and the teaching of necessary study and information technology skills, in a peer group setting. After completion of the programme the majority of these older learners remain in education. Further funding is required to support the project.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts