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Book Full text available online for free

My home life: quality of life in care homes: a review of the literature

Author:
NATIONAL CARE HOMES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FORUM
Publisher:
Help the Aged
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
192p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

My Home Life is a new initiative aimed at improving the quality of life of those who are living, dying, visiting and working in care homes for older people. This review aims to find existing best practices in care homes and promote care homes as a positive option for older people. The project is working to help improve the quality of life in care home, through the development of a range of resources, events, practice development initiatives and other activities.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 3: aiding communication with people with dementia

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2005
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

A web-based briefing providing a concise summary of the current knowledge base on aiding communication with people with dementia. Coverage includes ethical considerations, views of service users and carers, innovative practice examples and implications for practice. Also highlights additional contacts and resources. The briefing was commissioned by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). The latest edition of this Briefing was produced in April 2005 and the next updated is due in April 2006.

Journal article

Inclusion/exclusion criteria in late life depression antidepressant efficacy trials

Authors:
ZIMMERMAN Mark, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32(9), 2017, pp.1009-1016.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: The generalisability of antidepressant efficacy trials (AETs) has been questioned. No studies have examined the inclusion/exclusion criteria used in placebo-controlled studies of late life depression and compared them to the criteria used in non-late life AETs. Method: The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review of placebo-controlled AETs published from January, 1995 through December, 2014. They compared the inclusion/exclusion criteria used in the 18 studies of late life depression to those used in non-late life depression. Results: There were nine inclusion/exclusion criteria that were used in more than half of the late life depression AETs: minimum severity on a symptom severity scale (100.0%), significant suicidal ideation (77.8%), psychotic features during the current episode of depression or history of a psychotic disorder (94.4%), history of bipolar disorder (77.8%), diagnosis of alcohol or drug abuse or dependence (83.3%), presence of a comorbid nondepressive, nonsubstance use Axis I disorder (55.6%), episode duration too short (66.7%), and an insufficient score on a cognitive screen (88.3%) or the presence of a cognitive disorder (55.6%). There were some differences between the late life and non-late life depression studies—use of a screening measure of cognitive functioning, presence of a cognitive disorder such as dementia, and the minimum depression severity cutoff score required at baseline. Conclusions: The inclusion/exclusion criteria in AETs of late life depression were generally similar to the criteria used in non-late life depression (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: Gypsies and Travellers

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
7
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older Gypsies and Travellers. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. Areas covered include: demographics, health, housing, and family and community. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: older lesbian, gay and bi-sexual people and older transgender people

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
24
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender people. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. Areas covered include: demographics, relationships and communities, financial wellbeing, physical and mental health, housing and neighbourhoods, care and support and end of life care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Towards a new conceptualization of depression in older adult cancer patients: a review of the literature

Authors:
SARACINO Rebecca M., ROSENFELD Barry, NELSON Christian J.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 20(12), 2016, pp.1230-1242.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: This paper reviews the phenomenology of depression in older adults, and individuals diagnosed with cancer. Method: PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for English-language studies addressing the phenomenology, symptoms, or assessment of depression in older adults and those with cancer. Results: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria that appear to be relevant to both older adults and cancer patients are anhedonia, concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, psychomotor retardation/agitation, and loss of energy. Possible alternative criteria that may be important considerations included constructs such as loss of purpose, loneliness, and irritability in older adults. Among cancer patients, tearfulness, social withdrawal, and not participating in treatment despite ability to do so were identified as potentially important symptoms. Conclusions: Current DSM criteria may not adequately assess depression in older cancer patients and alternative criteria may be important to inform the understanding and identification of depression in this population. Enhancing diagnostic accuracy of depression is important as both the over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis is accompanied with significant costs. Thus, continued research exploring the phenomenology and identifying effective indicators of depression in older cancer patients is needed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Life story resources in dementia care: a review

Authors:
KINDELL Jacqueline, et al
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 15(3), 2014, pp.151-161.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Life story work has a relatively long tradition in the caring sciences and is recognised as an important component of dementia care and practice. However, to date, there has not been a review of accessible life story resources. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Following a systematic approach to identification and inclusion, 11 life story resources were reviewed to ascertain areas of commonality and divergence between the materials. Findings: The authors were able to group the analysis under eight areas and at the end of this process, it was uncertain if life story work is a formal staff intervention or an informal activity that people with dementia and their families could engage in. Resources also varied in terms of whether the life story information was organised in a chronological way, or with topics of interest/discussion or with a combination of both. Life story evaluation and its impact on the life of the person with dementia is in need of development. Practical implications: Across the resources the authors identified four reasons to do life story work which the authors have named as: emotional connections; interactional connections; building new connections and practical care connections. Social implications: There was limited guidance aimed at helping people with dementia to develop and compile their own life story. Originality/value: This paper provides new insights into the usefulness, future directions and content of life story resources in dementia care. It will be of interest to those in health and social care as well as people living with dementia. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Older people from black and minority ethnic groups: selected readings

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
59p.
Place of publication:
London

A selective bibliography on older people from black and minority ethnic groups. The references are drawn from the Ageinfo, the database of ageing and older age from the Centre for Policy on Ageing. A reference and short descriptive abstract is included for each reference.

Book Full text available online for free

Extra-care housing: selected readings

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
London

This publication lists selected readings from journals and reports/reviews drawn from material held on the Centre for Policy on Ageing ‘Ageinfo database of ageing and older people. It is sorted chronologically from 1975 to 2009.

Book Full text available online for free

Older people living in the community – nutritional needs barriers and interventions: a literature review

Authors:
JONES Jacklyn, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Good nutrition plays a vital role in the well-being and health of older people but also helps delay and reduce the risk of developing disease. This literature review focuses on the nutritional needs of older adults living in the community, the barriers to them meeting their nutritional needs, and interventions which may be successful in improving nutritional intake. Main findings are presented.

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