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Book Full text available online for free

Integrating extra care: partnership working in Staffordshire

Author:
EDWARDS Tim
Publisher:
DH Care Networks. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
London

This case study looks at the establishment of the first purpose build Extra Care facility in the Borough of Newcastle-under Lyme. Mill Rise provides 60 high quality apartments set within extensive communal facilities and landscaped environment. It is the result of successful joint working by 8 partner organisations, including Staffordshire County Council, Aspire Housing, and Prima, and demonstrates that multi-agency collaboration can provide value for money and improved outcomes for customers. This paper considers the design of Mill Rise, which includes a primary care centre in addition to the extra care complex of 60 apartments.  Also described are the extensive communication and involvement with the public though the life of the project, the person-centred approach to developing future services, and the key points learned from involvement in such a complex multidisciplinary project.

Book Full text available online for free

Access to information and services for older people: the joined-up approach

Authors:
RITTERS Katrina, DAVIS Howard
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
57p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report is based on interim findings from the evaluation of the LinkAge Plus pilots. It describes the innovative approaches to improving information and access to services for older people in the eight pilot areas. The pilot responses have included electronic information systems joining up information from partners; leaflet-based self-check lists; a council-wide IT system offering older callers additional services such as a home security check; an operational partnership whereby a range of service providers complete a simple checklist on each other's behalf when they visit a client and then refer for further services; network or neighbourhood centres extending the type of services they offer; and outreach in both urban and rural areas to reach the most isolated.

Book Full text available online for free

National evaluation of partnerships for older people projects: interim report on progress

Author:
UNIVERSITY OF HERTFORDSHIRE
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

This is an interim report of an ongoing evaluation of the national partnerships for older people programme. It is a statement of progress providing very early findings, lessons learned and key messages from the experience of the pilots to date.

Journal article

The organisation, form and function of intermediate care services and systems in England: results from a national survey

Authors:
MARTIN Graham P., et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 15(2), March 2007, pp.146-154.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper reports the results of a postal survey of intermediate care coordinators (ICCs) on the organisation and delivery of intermediate care services for older people in England, conducted between November 2003 and May 2004. Questionnaires, which covered a range of issues with a variety of quantitative, tick-box and open-ended questions, were returned by 106 respondents, representing just over 35% of primary care trusts (PCTs). The authors discuss the role of ICCs, the integration of local systems of intermediate care provision, and the form, function and model of delivery of services described by respondents. Using descriptive and statistical analysis of the responses, they highlight in particular the relationship between provision of admission avoidance and supported discharge, the availability of 24-hour care, and the locations in which care is provided, and relate their findings to the emerging evidence base for intermediate care, guidance on implementation from central government, and debate in the literature. Whilst the expansion and integration of intermediate care appear to be continuing apace, much provision seems concentrated in supported discharge services rather than acute admission avoidance, and particularly in residential forms of post-acute intermediate care. Supported discharge services tend to be found in residential settings, while admission avoidance provision tends to be non-residential in nature. Twenty-four-hour care in non-residential settings is not available in several responding PCTs. These findings raise questions about the relationship between the implementation of intermediate care, and the evidence for and aims of the policy as part of National Health Service modernisation, and the extent to which intermediate care represents a genuinely novel approach to the care and rehabilitation of older people.

Book Full text available online for free

Integrated service delivery to ensure persons' functional autonomy

Editors:
HEBERT Rejean, TOURIGNY Andre, GAGNON Maxime, (eds.)
Publisher:
Edisem
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
323p.
Place of publication:
Saint-Hyacinthe, QC

Within healthcare-systems innovations in service organisations are constantly being constructed due -for example- to new medical-, governmental- or managerial insights, political constraints and/or financial objectives. The socio-demographic changes in Canada, the increasing costs, shortage of personnel and dissatisfaction among elders with the traditional hospital-centred-model forced the Canadians towards innovation.This book is relevant for all elders in the world: 'How can one's functional autonomy at old age adequately be ensured?' The book represents the struggle of researchers dealing with an innovation started in 1999 called Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) for the frail elders in three communities in Canada. Aspects of the Program of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy (PRISMA) are highlighted in this book.

Book Full text available online for free

Securing better mental health for older adults

Authors:
PHILP Ian, APPLEBY Louis
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

This document marks the start of a new initiative and provides a vision for how all mainstream and specialist health and social care services should work together to secure better mental health services for older people.This is the first time that the mental health and older people's divisions have adopted such a strategic approach in order to influence change and improve services for older people with mental illness.

Journal article

Organisatons working together to protect the elderly in Taiwan

Author:
LIN Li-Wen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Service Research, 4(30), 2004, pp.19-50.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This paper uses a network approach to examine the coordination of protective services for the elderly in Taipei City, Taiwan. The purposes of this study are to map the characteristics of network structures, and compare the different relational patterns and organizational roles. It also examines perspectives of organizations toward the factors that facilitate or impede service coordination for the protective services. The results show that patterns of interorganizational coordination do depend on the kind of resources being exchanged. Public agencies were the most central agencies in the protective service network. This article provides implications and guidelines for public policy-makers and organizations to establish effective service coordination to protect the elderly. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Journal article

Tooling up

Author:
GLASSMAN Julie
Journal article citation:
Care and Health Magazine, 30.3.04, 2004, pp.14-17.
Publisher:
Care and Health

Looks at the tools which have been introduced to help social care professionals implement the single assessment process (SAP) and reports on progress so far.

Journal article

New jobs old roles: working for prevention in a whole-system model of health and social care for older people

Authors:
SMITH Naomi, BARNES Marian
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 21(1), 2013, pp.79-87.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The ‘Partnerships for Older People Projects’ programme provided government funding for local and health authorities to pilot prevention and intervention services in partnership with the voluntary sector and older people between 2006 and 2009. This evaluation of a pilot in southern England used a Theory of Change approach to gather and reflect on data with different groups involved in the delivery of this model of prevention. This whole-system model, although complex and challenging to implement, was considered overall to have been a success and provided significant learning for partners and stakeholders on the challenges and benefits of working across professional and sectoral boundaries. New posts were created as part of the model – two of these, recruited to and managed by voluntary sector partners, were identified as ‘new jobs’, but echoed ‘old roles’ within community and voluntary sector based health and social care. The authors reflect on the parallels of these roles with previously existing roles and ways of working and reflect on how the whole-system approach of this particular pilot enabled these new jobs to develop in appropriate and successful ways.

Book Full text available online for free

Combatting loneliness: a guide for local authorities

Author:
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
Publisher:
Local Government Association
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
44p.
Place of publication:
London

Loneliness is a significant and growing issue for many older people.  Research over decades has found that acute loneliness has been consistently estimated to affect around 10-13% of the population of older people. Over the same time period, there has been a growing percentage of older people who sometimes feel lonely. Loneliness makes older people vulnerable to developing chronic health problems, depression and increases the need for social care services or residential care. This guide offers a brief summary of key research on the issue of loneliness, and some practical steps every local authority, working in partnership with other statutory bodies and their partners, can take to tackle loneliness, setting them in the context of an overall framework for action. The described framework comprises 3 tiers of actions: at the strategic level across the local authority; at the level of the community; and at the level of the individual. Suggested practical steps are illustrated by case studies drawn from around the country.

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