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Journal article

Turner's syndrome: continuing to thrive at 75

Author:
SMITH Jana O.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 31(3/4), 1999, pp.187-195.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Turner's Syndrome is a female chromosomal aberration, which occurs in approximately 1 in 2,500 female births. This article provides a psycho-social history of Dr Henry Turner's oldest patient with Turner's Syndrome. This chronicle illustrates the positive and negative impact of receiving little information about the syndrome, and provides recommendations for intervention by professionals who work with this population.

Journal article

Auto therapy: using automobiles as vehicles for reminiscence with older adults

Authors:
ANDERSON Keith A., WEBER Katherine V.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(5), 2015, pp.469-483.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Reminiscence can be beneficial for older adults and contribute to well-being and ego integrity. In this exploratory pilot study, researchers assessed the feasibility and tolerability of a reminiscence intervention using automobiles as the focal point. Nineteen older adults (N = 19) living in independent living facilities were asked to reminisce using photographs of automobiles from across their lifespan. The RE-AIM framework was used to assess the intervention in terms of reach (willingness of participants to engage in the intervention), effectiveness (impact of the intervention), adoption (willingness of the facility to deliver the intervention), implementation (fidelity and consistency of the delivery), and maintenance (feasibility of continuing the use of the intervention). Results found that the intervention was well-received, quickly established rapport, and effectively fostered reminiscence. Social workers may find this intervention useful in helping older adults to explore their lives. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The heterogeneity of socially isolated older adults: a social isolation typology

Author:
MACHIELSE Anja
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(4), 2015, pp.338-356.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Recent statistics show a growing number of older adults who are living alone and are socially isolated. It is against this background that, in recent years, many interventions have been developed to address social isolation among the elderly. Evaluative studies show that most interventions are hardly effective, though. An important reason for this is the heterogeneity of the socially isolated. This article offers insight into this heterogeneity by presenting a typology with different profiles of socially isolated older adults and the intervention implications of this typology. The typology is derived from an extensive qualitative study on socially isolated elderly individuals in the Netherlands. The typology imposes some degree of order to a diversity of circumstances, ambitions, and possibilities of the socially isolated elderly, thereby deepening the understanding of the heterogeneity of this population. The definition of social isolation used in this study starts from a societal angle of incidence, namely the current policy context of Western European welfare states, in which governments emphasize the importance of independence and self-reliance of their citizens. Developed from that perspective, the typology provides a theoretical basis for applying interventions aimed at increasing self-reliance of social isolated elderly. This perspective on social isolation also has consequences for the way in which the effectiveness of interventions to alleviate social isolation is assessed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Daily crosswords improve verbal fluency: a brief intervention study

Authors:
MURPHY Mike, O'SULLIVAN Katie, KELLEHER Kieran G.
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 29(9), 2014, pp.915-919.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: Phonemic verbal fluency (PVF) is a cognitive function that involves serial processes termed clustering and switching and which is impacted in both normal aging and dementia. The cognitive reserve hypothesis suggests that appropriate cognitive stimulation could maintain or improve cognitive performance. This study examines the effect on PVF performance of a brief crossword-based intervention in a cognitively normal, community-based sample. Methods: Thirty-seven members of active retirement groups volunteered to participate and were randomly assigned to a crossword group and a control group. The former attempted a crossword daily for 4 weeks while the latter kept a daily gratitude diary for the same period. Results: 2 × 2 mixed analyses of variance revealed that the crossword group performed significantly better over time than the control group in both total PVF score and in the cluster size component. Conclusion: Daily crosswords may be a simple and effective means of bolstering PVF performance in older people. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The effectiveness of dyadic interventions for people with dementia and their caregivers

Authors:
MOON Heehyul, ADAMS Kathryn Betts
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 12(6), 2013, pp.821-839.
Publisher:
Sage

To review the effects of dyadic interventions on caregivers and care recipients in the early stages of dementia searches were carried out on four databases (AgeLine, Medline, EBSCO, and PyscINFO) and relevant literature from 2000 onwards reviewed. The twelve studies identified used a variety of intervention approaches including support group, counseling, cognitive stimulation, skill training, and notebook-keeping. This review suggests that intervention programs for early-stage dementia caregiving dyads were feasible and well accepted by participants. The reviewed studies provided rich evidence of the significance of mutual understanding and communication to partners’ well-being and relationship quality within the caregiving process. The findings suggest that these intervention approaches improved cognitive function of the care recipients, social relations, and the relationship between the primary caregivers and the care recipients, although evidence of long-term effectiveness is lacking. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Managing chronic pain in older people

Author:
SCHOFIELD Patricia
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 109(30), 2013, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

This article presents the results of a collaborative project between the British Pain Society and British Geriatric Society to produce guidelines on pain management for older people. The guidelines are the first of their kind in the UK and aim to provide best practice for the management of pain to all health professionals working with older people in any care setting. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A qualitative evaluation of the provision of bereavement care accessed by service users living in a health and social care trust area in Northern Ireland

Authors:
MONTGOMERY Lorna, CAMPBELL Anne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, 8(2), April 2012, pp.165-181.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

Within the health and social care sector today, the management of death and bereavement has become increasingly challenging. This qualitative study aimed to investigate the bereavement care offered to individuals living in one Health and Social Care Trust catchment area of Northern Ireland. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 key government and voluntary agency staff. The results suggest that much of the bereavement provision is based on the interest and initiative of individual staff members, with few processes to assess the level of bereavement care needed and those best skilled to provide it. Recommendations are made for a bereavement care strategy that outlines a bereavement needs assessment process. Implications for practice are presented.

Journal article

Assessing the impact of a restorative home care service in New Zealand: a cluster randomised controlled trial

Authors:
KING Anna I. I., et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 20(4), July 2012, pp.365-374.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Restorative care, which focuses on helping clients do things for themselves, is one approach to improving home care services. This study investigated the impact of a restorative home care service for 186 community-dwelling older people who received assistance from a home care agency in New Zealand. A randomised controlled trial was undertaken, where older people were interviewed face-to-face at baseline, four and seven months. Ninety three participants received restorative home care and 93 people received usual home care. Findings revealed that compared with usual care, the intervention demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in health-related quality of life at 7 months for older people. There were no changes in other measurements for older people in either group over time. There was a significant difference in the number of older people in the intervention group identified for reduced hours (29%) compared with the control group (0%). The authors concluded that a restorative home care service may be of benefit to older people, and improve service efficacy.

Journal article

Poetry in dementia care: overcoming the challenges

Authors:
GREGORY Helen, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 20(2), March 2012, pp.20-23.
Publisher:
Hawker

The poem ‘opposite’ was written during Try to remember, an intervention for people with dementia. The authors have previously described the project, from its commissioning and design to the implementation and evaluation, and highlighted some of the benefits brought to people with dementia. In this second article, the authors present some of the challenges they encountered, and in doing so, present a ‘less polished’ view of the arts-based intervention. The article has sections from all four project team members (the GP, project coordinator, the poet and the researcher), each presenting their individual views on the challenges they faced. The article attempts to highlight some of the complexities, contradictions, struggles and setbacks which characterise dementia care.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Enhancing quality of life in functionally vulnerable older adults: from randomized trial to standard care

Authors:
GITLIN Laura N., et al
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(1), Spring 2010, pp.84-87. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Individuals at any age can learn new strategies to engage in valued activities. Advancing Better Living for Elders or ABLE is a home-based intervention for functionally vulnerable older adults based on the Lifespan Theory of Control. An active phase of the intervention involves five occupational therapy sessions and one physical therapy home session (90 minutes) over six months. Use and challenges around the ABLE program are discussed.

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