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Journal article

Formal modeling techniques for ambient assisted living

Authors:
PARENTE Guido, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing International, 36(2), June 2011, pp.192-216.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

In the development of systems of ambient assisted living (AAL), formalized models and analysis techniques can provide a ground that makes development amenable to a systematic approach. The following formal modeling tools and techniques are reviewed in relation to AAL: fault trees, evidential reasoning, evidential ontology networks, temporal logic, hidden Markov models and partially observable Markov models. A number of scenarios are then presented to provide insight on how each technique can match the needs of different types of problem in the application domain.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Going techno in the house

Author:
VALIOS Natalie
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.3.10, 2010, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

North Yorkshire Council has achieved success with its use of assistive technology and telecare in helping older people remain independent. This article looks at the local authorities approach and the benefits to their older residents.

Journal article

‘I feel so much safer’: unravelling community equipment outcomes

Authors:
SAINTY Mandy, LAMBKIN Christopher, MAILE Louise
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72(11), November 2009, pp.499-506.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

This study looks at the impact of community equipment services on the health and wellbeing outcomes of choice and control, quality of life, and personal dignity. Questionnaires were sent out to 483 adults who had been prescribed community equipment by social or primary care services to meet mobility needs (97), domestic activity needs (99), bathing needs (150), toileting needs (93) and sensory needs (44). A response rate of 52% was achieved.  Seventy-eight per cent of respondents reported that they were using all the equipment prescribed. Of those who were using the equipment, 91% reported feeling safer and over 80% said that it made a positive difference to their independence, quality of life or ability to do things when they wanted. Bathing equipment was either very successful or not used at all, and the authors suggest that there is scope to maximise the effective use of bathing equipment. The provision of equipment had less of an impact on reducing the need for assistance at home, particularly from paid carers.

Journal article

Home improvement agencies' response to an ageing society

Author:
RAMSAY Malcolm
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 11(4), December 2008, pp.17-19.
Publisher:
Emerald

Since the Government published its lifetime homes strategy, the focus has shifted to home improvement agencies (HIAs) to find some of the answers to housing an ageing populations. This article describes what the future might look like for the HIA sector.

Journal article

The needs and experiences related to driving cessation for older people

Authors:
LIDDLE Jackie, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71(9), September 2008, pp.379-388.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Older people may cease driving owing to health concerns, discomfort while driving, cancellation of their licence or financial reasons. Because driving is fundamental to the freedom and independence of older people, driving cessation can lead to depression, loss of roles and unsafe use of alternative transport. Little consideration has been given to the development of approaches to improve outcomes for retiring drivers. This study aimed to understand the experiences of driving cessation for older people to inform the design of interventions for retiring drivers. Qualitative methodology was used to explore the experiences of driving cessation from the perspective of nine retired drivers, three family members and six service providers. The retired drivers experienced challenges during three phases of driving cessation, in addition to discussing their driving history. The challenges were (1) a predecision phase - a balancing act and achieving awareness; (2) a decision phase - making the decision and owning the decision; and (3) a post-cessation phase - finding new ways and coming to terms. Interventions to facilitate the process of driving cessation may need to be designed according to the phase of driving cessation and the challenges that the person is experiencing and to be underpinned by behaviour change and life transition theories.

Journal article

Fear of falling and activity avoidance in a national sample of older adults in the United States

Authors:
BERTERA Elizabeth, BERTERA Robert L.
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Work, 33(1), February 2008, pp.54-62.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This study assesses the relationship between fear of falling and avoidance of nine everyday activities critical to independence among community-dwelling older adults in the United States. Secondary data analysis was performed with National Survey of Self-Care and Aging interview data from 3,474 respondents age 65 years or older. Falls were reported by 24 percent of respondents, fear of falling was reported by 22 percent of respondents, and both increased with age. Fear of falling was the most important factor in predicting activity avoidance among older adults; the number of falls experienced increases the impact that fear of falling has on activity avoidance. Other factors were as follows: needing help with activities of daily living and the number of prescriptions taken. Assessments of older individuals should include fear of falling and fall history. Reductions in fear of falling and increases in activity level could provide significant benefits by helping older adults to maintain functioning and the ability to live independently.

Book Full text available online for free

Research and development work relating to assistive technology 2006-07: presented pursuant to section 22 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
56p.
Place of publication:
London

Recent technological advances mean that, as well as research into the benefits of specific products, the systems, combinations of technologies and the way assistive technology interfacts with new mainstream technology are also researched. The Department of Health (DH) produces an annual report on this work: Research and development work relating to assistive technology. It covers the research and development work carried out by or on behalf of any Government department in relation to equipment that might increase the mobility, activities and independence or well being of disabled people and those suffering from long-term conditions. The annual reports are produced for DH by the Foundation for Assistive Technology (FAST).  FAST is a charity funded by DH that works with the assistive technology community to promote useful research and development for disabled and older people.

Journal article

The role of perceived control in explaining depressive symptoms associated with driving cessation in a longitudinal study

Authors:
WINDSOR Timothy D., et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 47(2), April 2007, pp.215-223.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The purpose of this article was to investigate the role of control beliefs in mediating the relationship between driving cessation and change in depressive symptoms in a population-based sample of older adults. The authors report results from a prospective, community-based cohort study that included two waves of Australian data collected in 1992 and 1994. Participants consisted of 700 men and women aged 70 and older, including 647 drivers and 53 participants who ceased driving between baseline (1992) and follow-up (1994). Participants took part in interviews that included assessments of driving status, sociodemographic characteristics, self-rated health, sensory function, depressive symptoms (through the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale), and expectancy of control. Using multilevel general linear models, the study examined the extent to which driving status, expectancy of control, and relevant covariates explained change in depressive-symptom scores between baseline and follow-up. The results found driving cessation was associated with an increase in depressive symptoms from baseline to follow-up. The higher depressive-symptom scores of ceased drivers relative to those of individuals who remained drivers at both waves was partly explained by a corresponding decrease in the sense of control among ceased drivers, and increased control beliefs among drivers. Interventions aimed at promoting the maintenance of personal agency and associated control beliefs could be protective against the negative psychological concomitants of driving cessation.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Let's go techno

Author:
HOPKINS Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.4.07, 2007, pp.44-45.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The author looks at the Signal project in Leicestershire, which provides equipment, advice and information to help older people with day to day activities. The technology is now showcased on a tour bus to show people which tours around the area to demonstrate what is on offer.

Book

Rights for real: older people, human rights and the CEHR

Author:
BUTLER Frances
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
London

Examines the importance of human rights law for older people, especially those who depend on public services. Shows that it is equally important to recognise any potential role of human rights as a framework of values underpinning the planning and delivery of public services. Argues that all public authorities have a role in making human rights a reality for older people.

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